Swedish composer – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 05:23:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://allanpettersson.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-19-120x120.png Swedish composer – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ 32 32 Finnish composer Paavo Heininen has died https://allanpettersson.org/finnish-composer-paavo-heininen-has-died/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 14:35:24 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/finnish-composer-paavo-heininen-has-died/ The “most uncompromising Finnish composer of his generation” was born on January 13, 1938 and died on January 18, 2021 Composer Paavo Heininen has died. In the February 2021 issue of Gramophone, Andrew Mellor gave the following insight into the composer’s life and music, which we are reposting as a tribute. Contemporary composer: Paavo Heininen […]]]>

The “most uncompromising Finnish composer of his generation” was born on January 13, 1938 and died on January 18, 2021

Composer Paavo Heininen has died. In the February 2021 issue of Gramophone, Andrew Mellor gave the following insight into the composer’s life and music, which we are reposting as a tribute.

Contemporary composer: Paavo Heininen

Swedish composer Anders Eliasson has told a well-worn story of the day in 1993 when he showed up at the Sibelius Academy in Helsinki, as a visiting professor. The Academy’s composition chair welcomed him with an outstretched hand: “I am Paavo Heininen, modernist.

Schools and “isms” were already on the way out in the 90s, but even if Heininen knew that, he didn’t care. He is the most uncompromising Finnish composer of his generation and perhaps of the last 70 years (“the most gifted modernist in Finland”, for Gramophone‘s Guy Rickards) – a creator and pedagogue who clings to his serialist ways even when he seems to conceal them.

Heininen was Aarre Merikanto’s last pupil and reconstructed a number of his former teacher’s self-vandalized or unfinished pieces. In 1993, for example, he wrote a concept piece in his memory: Tuuminki- “An idea…of what might have been Aarre Merikanto’s 3rd Violin Concerto” (a work that Merikanto had destroyed). Anxious to be at the heart of the avant-garde despite Finland’s peripheral geography, Heininen traveled to Cologne to study with Rudolf Petzold and BA Zimmermann before enrolling at the Juilliard School in New York, where he was mainly Persichetti’s pupil. He would later study privately with Lutosawski.

Sibelius was still breathing when Heininen’s first significant work was introduced in 1957, the neoclassical Piano Sonatina. A watershed moment would come the following year. Continuing a distinguished line, the first performance of Heininen’s Symphony No. 1 was a calamity. The orchestra which gave its premiere refused to play the middle section of the work and only the first and last movements were played.

The event proved pivotal – traumatic enough for Heininen to contemplate his future, and newsworthy enough for his name to be etched in the consciousness of the new Nordic music scene as that of a enfant terrible. But Heininen would not change direction – as such. On the contrary, he realized that in some works the full implementation of his serial ideas would be more viable and even possible than in others. Two trends of equal importance emerged in his work. In one, he indulged his musical imagination fully and with a rigor that many found abrasive; in the other, he put his technique at the service of chiselled, distilled music, which was appreciated as a simple and beautiful expression of the same rigorous principles.

The composer’s symphonies perfectly illustrate the difference, oscillating between the two strands. After the appalling inauguration of Symphony No. 1, its 1962 successor aims to please. It was written for a light orchestra, is subtitled Little joyful symphony and has nuances of Martin≤’s wit and Berg’s lyricism (it recalls the latter also in its instrumentation, especially its use of a saxophone). In truth, it probably owes more to Heininen’s time with Persichetti in New York.

Symphony No 3 (1969, rev 1977) was a rigorously disciplined attempt to force potentially bulky material into simple, tight forms – a challenge for a composer known for his abundance of detail per unit time. In a sense, it embodies the central paradox of Heininen’s entire compositional project: the fertility of his material and the concentration of his spirit. Again, this proved to be technically overwhelming. Only part of the score could have been presented when it was created, and debate still rages as to how many movements even the complete score has. Symphony No. 4 (1971) reacts once again, becoming thinner and simpler. Its two movements bear the title “Sinfonietta” and contain elements of both random technique and sonata form.

It took Heininen three decades to return to the symphony, but No. 5 (2002) is truly off-putting, as if he had spent all that time trying to get out of it. Its successor, No 6 (2013-15), premiered in 2015, is perhaps the composer’s best attempt to date to invest serial techniques with symphonic momentum. Despite the task at hand, it is not without playfulness.

If the even-numbered symphonies are full of stress and tension, they tell of Heininen struggling with the challenge of his own self-imposed discipline. Some think its restraints deliver cold, empty music arguing in the corners; GramophoneBoth the deans of Nordic music David Fanning and the late Robert Layton have expressed reservations in these pages about the major works of the composer’s pen. Time and the march of postmodernism have revealed qualities that have long been overlooked. One of them is this very sense of tension, heard most clearly in the Mahlerian edifice for strings Arioso (1967). This piece is a good starting point for newcomers to Heininen and leads naturally to the impressive Adagio … concerto for orchestra in forma di variazioni (1963, rev 1966) – a set of monumental variations in which a huge orchestra plays like a chamber ensemble, a testament to the composer’s meticulous instrumentation.

The same quality is found in music that is altogether more piquant but with the same chronology (with origins prior to the composer’s 30th birthday), that of the sextet summer music (1963, rev. 1967). Kimmo Korhonen described the play as Heininen’s “closest approach to serialist constructivism” while drawing a helpful comparison to its direct predecessor, Soggetto (1963) for chamber orchestra, in which sound fields and random elements are used (the latter piece was among the composer’s widely acclaimed early successes). Both devices are also in the Adagio and the first piano concerto (1964).

For a period in the 1970s, serialism in the Nordic countries was frowned upon – seen as going against the goals it had set for itself while going against social democratic principles of inclusiveness and of public value. Heininen’s response was to look into other uncompromising expressions of modernism that could be better understood, using spatial elements, separate sets, and echoing space-time techniques propagated by his kindred spirit Erik Bergman , especially in Tritopos (1977). Not that this completely prevented Heininen from using twelve-tone techniques. In a large assemblage of scores from 1974-75 collected as opus number 32, he included the sprawling piano sonata Sparkling and incandescent poetry, a string quartet and two shorter piano pieces. All, Heininen insisted, were “the same music” (that is, they were built on the same row of notes).

In the 1980s, Heininen would embrace computer-aided methods and follow his edgy, windswept Piano Concerto No. cello (1983 and 1985 respectively). He will also turn to musical theatre. Silkkirumpu (‘The Damask Drum’, subtitled ‘Concerto for Singers, Players, Words, Images and Movements’; 1981-83) is based on the symbolism of an ancient Japanese Noh piece and is holistically designed as a grand crescendo musical and dramatic; it was followed by the more dramatically conventional and musically typical Veitsi (“The Knife”, 1985-88). The latter won the competition for the Savonlinna Opera Festival in Finland in 1988 and was performed the following year to celebrate the city’s 350th anniversary.

Heininen joined the faculty of the Sibelius Academy as a part-time lecturer in 1966; he was appointed full professor in 1993 and remained in the post until 2001. In these two positions he trained a golden generation of Finnish composers, including Jouni Kaipainen, Magnus Lindberg, Veli-Matti Puumala, Kaija Saariaho and Jukka Tiensuu. The individual paths followed by these characters bear witness to the principle that, however rigorously Heininen observed his own rules, he avoided imposing them on others. And yet, he did not abandon them: his last recorded work, the Boston Violin Sonatas (2016), suggests that his dodecaphonic method is fresher than ever.

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Daniel Hart, composer of ‘The Green Knight’ on the use of ancient instruments and a ‘Crash Course in Middle English Poetry’ https://allanpettersson.org/daniel-hart-composer-of-the-green-knight-on-the-use-of-ancient-instruments-and-a-crash-course-in-middle-english-poetry/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 17:00:47 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/daniel-hart-composer-of-the-green-knight-on-the-use-of-ancient-instruments-and-a-crash-course-in-middle-english-poetry/ Coming from a choral background, the composer Daniel Hart was well prepared to compose The green knight, but the real challenge was to create an old sound. With a base in ancient England during the time of King Arthur, it was important that the choral elements use the language of the time. Hart researched Middle […]]]>

Coming from a choral background, the composer Daniel Hart was well prepared to compose The green knight, but the real challenge was to create an old sound. With a base in ancient England during the time of King Arthur, it was important that the choral elements use the language of the time. Hart researched Middle English poetry to understand how things were pronounced differently at that time.

The green knight, based on the 14th century poem, tells the story of Sir Gawain, a nephew of King Arthur who accepts a challenge from the Green Knight. Gawain then embarks on a quest to prove his bravery and honor.

The score for The green knight was shortlisted in the Best Score category for this year’s Oscar race.

What were your first thoughts on what the score should be?

We had a first conversation probably at the end of 2018 and talked about instrumentation, which is usually how we start. I told him that I wanted to try having recorder quartets, like a baroque recorder quartet, as the main instrument. And then I had been obsessed with this Swedish navy stringed instrument called “nyckelharpa”.

Do you know the legend of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight previously?

I had never read it before, but some of my research when I started working on the music for the film felt like a crash course in Middle English poetry, because the film had at least a few scenes where people were singing . in front of the camera and I thought they should sing in Middle English. So I started reading and listening to a bunch of Middle English poetry to get an idea of ​​how words sound and how they are different from the way we pronounce things now. There’s a piece on the score called “O Nyghtegale”, for example, and the single word “nightingale” sounds like a completely different word. There is a big Scandinavian influence in Middle English which is basically part of the English we speak now.

How do you use instruments, like the nyckelharpa, to emphasize the choral elements?

I think the choir and the recorders often did the same things, like in the first piece of music that appears in the film, they come and go, the recorder quartet and our choir of seven. they are a calm response to each other in this piece of music. The nyckelharpa is very similar to a viola cello, in that it is a bowed string instrument. So most of the time I used it for the melody, and I used the recorders and the choruses more to create a mood.

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Daniel Hart, composer of “The Green Knight” on the use of old instruments – Deadline https://allanpettersson.org/daniel-hart-composer-of-the-green-knight-on-the-use-of-old-instruments-deadline/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/daniel-hart-composer-of-the-green-knight-on-the-use-of-old-instruments-deadline/ Coming from a choral background, composer Daniel Hart was well prepared to compose The green knight, but the real challenge was to create an old sound. With a base in ancient England during the time of King Arthur, it was important that the choral elements use the language of the time. Hart did a lot […]]]>

Coming from a choral background, composer Daniel Hart was well prepared to compose The green knight, but the real challenge was to create an old sound. With a base in ancient England during the time of King Arthur, it was important that the choral elements use the language of the time. Hart did a lot of research into Middle English poetry to understand how things were pronounced differently around this time.

The green knight, based on the 14th century poem, tells the story of Sir Gawain, a nephew of King Arthur who accepts a challenge from the Green Knight. Gauvain then embarks on a quest to prove his bravery and honor.

The score for The green knight was shortlisted in the Best Score category for this year’s Oscar race.

What were your initial thoughts on what the score should be?

We had a first conversation probably at the end of 2018 and talked about instrumentation, which is usually how we start. I told him that I wanted to try to have recorder quartets, like a baroque recorder quartet, as the main instrument. And then I had become obsessed with this Swedish navy string instrument called “nyckelharpa”.

Do you know the legend of Sir Gauvain and the Green Knight previously?

I had never read it before, but part of my research when I started working on the music for the film was like a crash course in Middle English poetry because the film had at least a few scenes where people would sing. in front of the camera and I thought they should sing in Middle English. So I started reading and listening to a bunch of Middle English poetry so I could get a feel for the sounds of words and how they are different from the way we pronounce things now. There is a piece on the score called “O Nyghtegale”, for example, and the single word “nightingale” sounds like a completely different word. There is a great Scandinavian influence in Middle English which is basically part of the English we speak now.

How do you use instruments, like the nyckelharpa, to emphasize the choral elements?

I think the choir and the recorders often did the same things, like in the first piece of music that appears in the movie, they come and go, the recorder quartet and our seven-person choir. I wanted them to be a calm response to each other in this piece of music. The nyckelharpa is much like an alto cello, in that it is a bowed string instrument. So most of the time I used it for the melody, and I used the recorders and the chorus more to create an atmosphere.

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The Unknown Composer Who Would Have Been King – Royal Central https://allanpettersson.org/the-unknown-composer-who-would-have-been-king-royal-central/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 08:31:13 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/the-unknown-composer-who-would-have-been-king-royal-central/ By Friedrich Dürck – Images in the public domain since 1938, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6726907 Several military marches that are part of our musical heritage were composed by King Carl Johan of Sweden and grandson of Norway, Prince Gustaf. In 1852, 25-year-old Gustaf, the “song prince”, became the first royal to die in the new palace […]]]>

By Friedrich Dürck – Images in the public domain since 1938, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6726907

Several military marches that are part of our musical heritage were composed by King Carl Johan of Sweden and grandson of Norway, Prince Gustaf.

In 1852, 25-year-old Gustaf, the “song prince”, became the first royal to die in the new palace in the Norwegian capital of Christiania. Despite his young age, he had managed to write over fifty pieces of music – many of which were of high quality, according to music experts.

If he had lived to the average life expectancy, he would become monarch in Norway and Sweden. He was the second eldest son of King Oscar I and Queen Josephine. His older brother, Carl, was a year older and became king upon their father’s death in 1859. However, Carl died relatively young, at the age of 46. Therefore, the third son of King Oscar I became King Oscar II.

Just four months before his death, Gustaf was commissioned by his father, Oscar I, to lead the work of establishing archives for the information of Swedish war history and war facilities. Newspapers and letters may indicate that he volunteered to receive the mission because he wanted to study further. Prince Gustaf was a gentle man, but as a royal he also had to undergo military training.

In 1843, he became a volunteer in the cavalry, and it was at this time that he was inspired by musical composition. For example, his time in the army gave him the inspiration, at the age of 16, to compost, among other tunes, the march “Till Lif-Regimentets Dragoner 1843”.

A number of Prince Gustaf’s military marches are still often used by the Danish, Norwegian and Swedish military. In addition, many of his songs are still popular as drinking songs, especially among Norwegian and Swedish students.

In the summer of 1852, King Oscar I fell ill and went on a health trip to Bavaria, which Prince Gustav joined. After a month the king had recovered, but on the way home Prince Gustav fell ill.

Gustav’s duty as the king’s son was stronger than the duty to take care of his health. Therefore, he joined the arduous sea voyage from Germany via Denmark to Norway. After nine days spent in bed at the royal palace in the Norwegian capital, he died on September 24, 1852.

His death changed the Bernadottes forever. The funeral took place in the Royal Chapel inside the Royal Palace of Christiania. The coffin was then transported by sea to Stockholm, where, on arrival, its own military march was performed in tribute.

The prince was buried in the church of Riddarholmen.


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Composer Jacob Mühlrad launches collaboration with Swedish House Mafia https://allanpettersson.org/composer-jacob-muhlrad-launches-collaboration-with-swedish-house-mafia/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 16:38:33 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/composer-jacob-muhlrad-launches-collaboration-with-swedish-house-mafia/ The house music group released the Swedish composer’s symphonic interpretation of their 2010 club classic on New Years Day. House music group Swedish house mafia released a symphonic interpretation of their 2010 club classic Your name). The reworked One Symphony was created in collaboration with a 30-year-old Swedish composer Jacob Mühlrad. Swedish House Mafia announced […]]]>

The house music group released the Swedish composer’s symphonic interpretation of their 2010 club classic on New Years Day.

House music group Swedish house mafia released a symphonic interpretation of their 2010 club classic Your name). The reworked One Symphony was created in collaboration with a 30-year-old Swedish composer Jacob Mühlrad.

Swedish House Mafia announced the release of the single via twitter on New Years Day alongside a screenshot of the three band members on a video call with a beaming Mühlrad.

Mühlrad said: “My starting point for writing A symphony was to use the beautiful simplicity of the originally written main melody as a downscaling movement in the interval of a fifth. The 5th is an interval that exists in all musical traditions around the world. I felt the need to keep trying to keep the gesture both rhythmic and melodic and to vary it as much as possible.

The youngest composer to ever perform his work at the Royal Swedish Opera, Mühlrad is the second Swede in history to be released by the influential classical music label Deutsche Grammophon. Her debut album with the label included substantial choral work Time (2018), who explored the word “time” in 27 different languages.

In 2020, Jacob Mühlrad began a multi-year collaboration with the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, including the commissioning and world premiere of his first major orchestral work. REMS in September 2020 at Konserthuset Stockholm.

The music video for the symphony, released next Friday (January 14), was created in collaboration with Swedish conceptual artist Alexander Wessely. Mühlrad and Wessely met in 2016, when Mühlrad Accompanied diagram one of Wessely’s art videos, and most recently worked together last year on Cyclic movements, a video piece exploring circularity, commissioned by textile recycling company Renewcell.

Founded in 2008, Swedish House Mafia reunited last year after a seven-year break with Flame moth, Lifetime and It gets better and the announcement of an international tour in 2022.

You can read more about Swedish House Mafia here.

You can read more about Jacob Mühlrad in his website.



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Boba Fett’s songwriter’s book might have found inspiration in a deep, deep cut https://allanpettersson.org/boba-fetts-songwriters-book-might-have-found-inspiration-in-a-deep-deep-cut/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 00:32:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/boba-fetts-songwriters-book-might-have-found-inspiration-in-a-deep-deep-cut/ The theme song “The Book of Boba Fett” has a different tempo and a smoother production sound, but is similar enough that it was either a direct influence or an inspiration from a third influencing source. as well as “Ronia, the thief’s daughter” (which had Björn Isfält as composer). Göransson’s version turns to a different […]]]>

The theme song “The Book of Boba Fett” has a different tempo and a smoother production sound, but is similar enough that it was either a direct influence or an inspiration from a third influencing source. as well as “Ronia, the thief’s daughter” (which had Björn Isfält as composer). Göransson’s version turns to a different melody; the overall effect is akin to dressing the peasants of this “Ronia” tavern in the dresses of a space choir and sending them to a galaxy far, far away to sing “Star Wars” songs.

As I noted in an article after the first episode of “The Book of Boba Fett”, screenwriter Lawrence Kasdan – who co-wrote “The Empire Strikes Back”, where Fett made his first live appearance – has compared the character to a “bad samurai” or ronin. Whether or not her new theme song is artistic theft is up for debate, but if a new background character named Ronia suddenly appears in Space Ronin’s Disney + series, then we’ll know it’s not just a coincidence. and “Boba Fett’s Theme Book” is a tribute to “Ronia, the Thief’s Daughter”.

“The Boba Fett Book” currently airs new episodes every Wednesday on Disney +.


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Interview: “Flee” composer Uno Helmersson (Podcast) https://allanpettersson.org/interview-flee-composer-uno-helmersson-podcast/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 15:17:04 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/interview-flee-composer-uno-helmersson-podcast/ On Right on Cue, editor-in-chief Clint Worthington chats with film, television and video game composers about the origins and nuances of their latest works, as well as commentary on the score’s most important pieces.. Refugee stories are a common topic in documentary filmmaking, especially in recent years (Human flow, simple as water). But Jonas Poher […]]]>

On Right on Cue, editor-in-chief Clint Worthington chats with film, television and video game composers about the origins and nuances of their latest works, as well as commentary on the score’s most important pieces..

Refugee stories are a common topic in documentary filmmaking, especially in recent years (Human flow, simple as water). But Jonas Poher Rasmussen is To flee is something unique. Recounting the story of one of Jonas’ childhood friends, a gay Afghan refugee named Amin, To flee traces the childhood of his subject in Afghanistan and the circumstances in which he had to leave (the violence and misery of the Afghan civil war in the 80s and 90s). Fleeing to Denmark without the rest of his family, he was left on his own to find out about himself – not just his sexuality, but his identity as well.

Told in striking minimalist animation, illustrating both interview segments with Amin and dramatized accounts of his past, To flee looks like a hazy memory of a traumatic story, both from the Middle East and its protagonist. But for all of its applicability to real-world politics, its scope remains deeply personal – how global seismic events reverberated throughout Amin’s life, and looking back with nostalgia on how they made him the man he was. ‘it is today.

The score is just as evocative as the animation, courtesy of the prolific Swedish composer and multi-instrumentalist Uno Helmersson. Experimental and understated, but perfectly in tune with the interiority of his subject, Uno’s dense and superimposed clues float around the periphery of the film to give voice to things Amin doesn’t say – about himself, about himself, about himself. her love life and much more.

Uno Helmersson Joins Us to Talk About His Unique Approach to Scoring To flee, and his working life in film and television music.

You can find Uno Helmersson on his official website here.

To flee is currently available in theaters. You can also listen to the sheet music of To flee on your favorite music streaming service courtesy of Milan Records.

Love? Take a second to support The Spool on Patreon!


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The Miller Theater presents a portrait of composer by Italian LUCA FRANCESCONI in February https://allanpettersson.org/the-miller-theater-presents-a-portrait-of-composer-by-italian-luca-francesconi-in-february/ Fri, 17 Dec 2021 10:48:04 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/the-miller-theater-presents-a-portrait-of-composer-by-italian-luca-francesconi-in-february/ The Miller Theater at Columbia University School of the Arts continues its 2021-22 Portrait of Composers series with Luca Francesconi. The Signal Ensemble, in their first live ensemble concert since COVID, presents two full-scale premieres by the Italian composer whose work Brad Lubman has conducted many times in Europe. The event will take place on […]]]>

The Miller Theater at Columbia University School of the Arts continues its 2021-22 Portrait of Composers series with Luca Francesconi. The Signal Ensemble, in their first live ensemble concert since COVID, presents two full-scale premieres by the Italian composer whose work Brad Lubman has conducted many times in Europe.

The event will take place on Thursday, February 3 at 8:00 p.m. at the Miller Theater (2960 Broadway, 116th Street).

Tickets start at $ 20 ($ 10 for students with valid ID).

Luca Francesconi, born in Milan, studied piano at the Milan Conservatory and composition with Azio Corghi, Karlheinz Stockhausen and Luciano Berio. He also spent a period in Boston studying jazz. He was Berio’s assistant from 1981 to 1984. In 1990 he founded Agon Acustica Informatica Musica, a center for music research and production in Milan.

Francesconi has written over a hundred works – ranging from solo to large orchestral pieces, from opera to multimedia – and commissioned and performed around the world. He regularly collaborates with leading conductors, soloists and ensembles. He has composed five radio operas and several musical theater works including Ballata (La Monnaie, Brussels); Gesualdo considered a murderer for the Holland Festival; Quartet (2011) based on a play by Heiner Müller, commissioned by Teatro alla Scala / Wiener Festwochen (directed by Àlex Ollé / Fura dels Baus, conducted by Susanna Mälkki). Quartett has been performed over 80 times since its inception all over the world. His most recent opera is Trompe-la-Mort (after Balzac). It was staged at the Opéra National de Paris in 2017 (directed by Guy Cassiers, conducted by Susanna Mällki).

Works in its extensive catalog include: Etymo for soprano, live electronics and chamber orchestra (CD Kairos with the Ensemble intercontemporain and Barbara Hannigan); Wanderer for large orchestra commissioned by Filarmonica della Scala and conducted by Riccardo Muti; Cobalt, Scarlet commissioned by Mariss Jansson for the Oslo Philharmonic and performed frequently by orchestras including the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the San Francisco Symphony, the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, the BBC Symphony Orchestra, the Orchester philharmonique de Radio France, the Göteborgs Symfoniker, the Cleveland Orchestra and the Israel Philharmonic Orchestra; Hard Pace, a trumpet concerto for Håkan Hardenberger commissioned by the Orchester dell’Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia under the direction of Antonio Pappano, with ZaterdagMatinee Concertgebouw, Göteborgs Symfoniker, Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra and MITO SettembreMusica; Unexpected End of Formula, a cello concerto commissioned and performed by the Musikfabrik Ensemble in Cologne and dedicated to Helmut Lachenmann.

In recent years Francesconi has written: Duende, The Dark Notes (2013), a violin concerto for Leila Josefowicz commissioned by the Swedish Radio Orchestra, the BBC Proms, the RAI National Symphony Orchestra conducted by Susanna Mällki ; Piano Concerto (2013) for Nicolas Hodges commissioned by Casa da Música (Porto); Dentro non ha tempo (2014), a piece for orchestra commissioned by the Teatro alla Scala and performed by Esa-Pekka Salonen; Vertical Invader (2015) written for the reed quintet Calefax and the Radio Filharmonisch Orkest and premiered at the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam; Macchine in echo (2015), a concerto for GrauSchumacher Piano Duo commissioned by WDR, Musica and the Wiener Konzerthaus / Ernst von Siemens Foundation, and premiered in Cologne; and Bread, Water and Salt (2015) for choir and orchestra inspired by Nelson Mandela, co-commissioned by the Accademia di Santa Cecilia and Radio France and premiered in Rome under the direction of Antonio Pappano. Daedalus (2017) for flute and ensemble was commissioned by the Daniel Barenboim Foundation with a world premiere (Boulez Saal, Berlin) performed by Emmanuel Pahud and the Ensemble Boulez under the direction of Daniel Barenboim (January 2018). Das Ding singt, a concerto for cello and orchestra, was commissioned by the Lucerne Festival and written for Jay Campbell under the direction of Matthias Pintcher (2017). We Wept, for mezzo-soprano and ensemble, was written for the London Sinfonietta conducted by George Benjamin (2018). Trauma Études was written for Ensemble Signal and premiered in Washington DC under the direction of Brad Lubman (2019). Zero Formula, his recent work for electric guitar and orchestra premiered by the Orquestra Metropolitana de Lisboa in Lisbon (2019), with conductor Pedro Amaral and soloist Ruben Mattia Santorsa. Future projects include Timon of Athens, an opera for the Bayerische Staatsoper and a violin concerto for Patricia Kopatchinskaja.

Francesconi is also an active conductor and has taught master classes and at conservatories around the world for 30 years. He was musical director of the Venice Biennale (2008-2011) and artistic director of the Ultima Oslo Contemporary Festival (2011). In 2012, he was professor in residence at the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation and professor in residence and featured composer at the new IRCAM event in Paris, acanthes @ ircam. In 2013, he was composer in residence at the Casa da Música in Porto.

In 2018, Francesconi received two grand prizes: the Antonio Feltrinelli Prize for Musical Composition and the Italics Prize for the opera Trompe-la-Mort.


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Qatari composer Dana Al Fardan to perform at D’reesha Performing Arts Festival 2021 https://allanpettersson.org/qatari-composer-dana-al-fardan-to-perform-at-dreesha-performing-arts-festival-2021/ Sun, 12 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/qatari-composer-dana-al-fardan-to-perform-at-dreesha-performing-arts-festival-2021/ Doha: Qatari contemporary composer, Dana Al Fardan, will headline to perform seven songs from her fourth album, Indigo, at the first-ever D’reesha Performing Arts Festival 2021 in Doha. The live performance is set to feature a chamber orchestra, state-of-the-art light design and projection, and a captivating color palette to transform the open-air environment of the […]]]>

Doha: Qatari contemporary composer, Dana Al Fardan, will headline to perform seven songs from her fourth album, Indigo, at the first-ever D’reesha Performing Arts Festival 2021 in Doha.

The live performance is set to feature a chamber orchestra, state-of-the-art light design and projection, and a captivating color palette to transform the open-air environment of the Qatar Foundation’s ceremonial courtyard to Education City Doha.

The December 16 show at 8 p.m. is inspired by the album’s nod to Johann Wolfgang Goethe’s theory of color, who states: “We have observed that all of nature manifests itself through color in the sense of light. Therefore, by manipulating light and color with an infusion of sound, the Indigo concert changes the mood into a unique perception for each viewer.

Commenting on the upcoming concert, Dana Al Fardan said, “To headline this extraordinary event is an honor. The performing arts scene in Qatar is full of incredibly innovative artists, and I’m thrilled to be involved with D’reesha to help engage a new generation of talent in our communities.

“The concert will be an exciting and inspiring spectacle,” she continued. “Indigo breaks the rules of ‘selective absorption’ and works to connect the audience to their extra-spectral senses.

“What we’ve created is a remarkable experience that encourages viewers to grow and merge with their surroundings and within themselves on a much deeper level,” she added.

The D’reesha Performing Arts Festival will be a year-round performance lab that aims to empower students. It will culminate in an annual festival that will transform Education City into an open stage.

Event: Indigo Concert with Dana Al Fardan

Venue: Qatar Foundation, Education City Doha, Ceremonial Courtyard

Date: December 16, 2021

Time: 8 p.m.

Tickets: QR50 online

Registration required!

Visit www.qf.org.qa/community/dreesha-performing-arts-festival

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The Last Guardian composer Takeshi Furukawa works on the music for Planet of Lana https://allanpettersson.org/the-last-guardian-composer-takeshi-furukawa-works-on-the-music-for-planet-of-lana/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 18:23:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/the-last-guardian-composer-takeshi-furukawa-works-on-the-music-for-planet-of-lana/ The next adventure game from developer Wishfully, Planet of Lana, will have The Last Guardian’s composer working on his music. There are a lot of different indie games coming out next year, many of them looking pretty stunning. Many of those coming to Xbox are also very promising. It can range from the atmosphere and […]]]>

The next adventure game from developer Wishfully, Planet of Lana, will have The Last Guardian’s composer working on his music.


Planet of Lana TGA

There are a lot of different indie games coming out next year, many of them looking pretty stunning. Many of those coming to Xbox are also very promising. It can range from the atmosphere and the dreary Somerville, cute Zelda-esque action-adventure title Tunic. Another of those indie side-scrollers will be another gorgeous game, known as Lana’s planet from independent developer Wishfully.

Lana’s planet was first revealed earlier this year at Summer Game Fest, with a trailer showing a young girl named Lana and her feline companion. The side-scoller also shows that Lana and her cat are being chased by something sinister, with spider-like robots chasing her. The game then featured a second trailer at The Game Awards showing not only more gameplay, but also music by Takeshi Furukawa, from The Last Guardian notoriety.

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According to Furukawa, after his work on The Last Guardian was finished, he met the Swedish studio who shared his vision for Lana’s planet. The composer fell in love with the concept of adventures with the sincere duo, joining the project. This was then followed by a new trailer for Lana’s planet, which gave fans a taste of what to expect regarding the game and its music.

This new Lana’s planet the trailer showed Lana riding on the back of one of the spider-like robots featured in the previous trailer, crossing the surface of the planet. She is however attacked by a series of robots on a journey through the desert, with many robots of different shapes and sizes. They all seem to be chasing her for some unknown reason, while Furukawa’s explosive score is played in the background. The trailer’s end shot shows Lana face down after being attacked by the robots, with her companion trying to wake her up.

Besides the composer, The Last Guardian even has a similar premise to Lana’s planet, where players are placed in the shoes of a protagonist accompanied by a pet. The difference being that Trico is a giant griffin-like beast while Lana’s cat-like creature is much smaller in comparison. The trailer shows that Lana’s planet has a lot of promise, thanks to its beautiful visuals enhanced by Furukawa’s intense orchestral score.

Lana’s planet is slated for release in 2022 for PC, Xbox One, and Xbox Series X / S.

MORE: All Game Announcements World Premieres At The Game Awards 2021


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