Swedish composer – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:51:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://allanpettersson.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-19-120x120.png Swedish composer – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ 32 32 ‘Black Panther 2’ Composer Explains How He Created Unique Namor Soundtrack https://allanpettersson.org/black-panther-2-composer-explains-how-he-created-unique-namor-soundtrack/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 15:06:31 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/black-panther-2-composer-explains-how-he-created-unique-namor-soundtrack/ Ludwig Göransson has big shoes to fill – his own. The Swedish film composer won an Oscar for his work on the 2018 superhero film Black Panther. Four years later, Göransson returns for the sequel, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever. This time around, part of his assignment was to write music to introduce an all-new character […]]]>

Ludwig Göransson has big shoes to fill – his own. The Swedish film composer won an Oscar for his work on the 2018 superhero film Black Panther. Four years later, Göransson returns for the sequel, Black Panther: Wakanda Forever. This time around, part of his assignment was to write music to introduce an all-new character to the series, Namor (Tenoch Huerta), the ruler of an underwater Mayan kingdom known as Talokan.

This was a challenge for Göransson since the first idea he had for creating music for Namor was to base it on the character’s Maya culture. The problem was, however, that there was no way of knowing what Mayan music sounded like. “I soon realized the music was gone,” Göransson said. Fandom. “It was forcibly erased. We don’t know exactly how it sounded.

Instead, Göransson decided to travel to Mexico City, where Huerta is from. There, he worked with musical archaeologists, who are experts in the field of Mayan music and instruments. “They did a lot of research to try to reimagine what this Mayan music would have sounded like and recorded a bunch of different instruments,” he said.

Some of these instruments, Göransson said, included “shells, turtle shells that you hit with sticks… [and] different types of shakers that sound like snakes or flying birds. Göransson also described a type of clay flute that was called “Death Whistle” because of the “incredible scream” it produces.

“I’ve never heard [that sound] before,” he said. “It’s so powerful that you can’t really be in the same room as someone playing it, but it fits in immediately. It made me think of Namor going into battle and when he does some of his powerful action moves. So this whole world started to be kind of reinvented. It was such a unique sound for me, and I was so excited to have this very different and unique sound for Talokan and for Namor, unlike the sound we had for Wakanda.

]]>
World premiere of composer Michael Shapiro’s “VOICES” on the Holocaust https://allanpettersson.org/world-premiere-of-composer-michael-shapiros-voices-on-the-holocaust/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 22:27:48 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/world-premiere-of-composer-michael-shapiros-voices-on-the-holocaust/ At the New York Central Synagogue New York, NY — The world premiere of Michael Shapiro VOICE to be held at New York’s famed Central Synagogue at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, November 10, 2022 (652 Lexington Avenue, E. 55e Street). Tickets for the concert are free and available to the public by registering […]]]>

At the New York Central Synagogue


New York, NY — The world premiere of Michael Shapiro VOICE to be held at New York’s famed Central Synagogue at 7:30 p.m., Thursday, November 10, 2022 (652 Lexington Avenue, E. 55e Street). Tickets for the concert are free and available to the public by registering at Central Synagogue website. This performance will feature Daniel Mutlu, Principal Cantor of Central Synagogue, Ember Choral Arts, and the American Modern Ensemble, conducted by Deborah Simpkin King.


The concept of VOICES originated over twenty years ago when Michael Shapiro served as music consultant to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. After reading poems by Sephardic victims of the Holocaust, he wrote the hour-long choral and chamber ensemble as a requiem: “not only [as] a work of memory, but as a warning. The composition is varied in tone and includes notes of cabaret, religious observance, and transcendent echoes that reflect the international impact of the Holocaust on Jews in different countries. According to Shapiro, “the composition offers an ending that testifies to the longing for a Jewish homeland, through which the voices of those who are appeased by evil and tyranny will be heard”.


Video released from the Central Synagogue will be streamed live on its YouTube and Facebook channels, and a recording will be released via Paumanok Records. The show marks a creative collaboration between internationally acclaimed artists Ember Choral Arts (formerly Schola Cantorum on Hudson), which has served the Manhattan and New Jersey areas since its founding in 1995, and the American modern set (formed by Victoria and Robert Paterson) which spotlights contemporary music through lively programming and performs a wide repertoire, using a strong combination of instrumentalists, singers and bandleaders.



About the composer


Michael Shapiro guest conducts internationally and is a laureate conductor of The Chappaqua Orchestra. He has written over 100 works for orchestral, theatre, film, chamber, choral and vocal forces. His music has been performed by many of the world’s leading orchestras and performers in North America and Europe, and much of his music is recorded and available on major platforms such as Spotify and Apple Music. His music is regularly broadcast around the world, including SiriusXM, National Public Radio, BBC, CBC, ABC-Australia, Polskie Radio and over 50 commercial radio stations in North America. His score for the classic film Frankenstein is his most popular work and has been performed more than 50 times around the world, including the upcoming premiere of the new lyric version at LA Opera. For more information, please visit www.MichaelShapiro.com


central synagogue is a Reform synagogue headed by Chief Rabbi Angela Buchdahl. At the heart of its mission is the belief that Judaism can and does change the world. The central community includes anyone who wishes to explore Judaism and its services are broadcast live to tens of thousands of viewers each week. Designated a New York City Landmark in 1966 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970, the Central Synagogue was nationally recognized as a United States Historic Landmark in 1975. Built in 1870-1872 and designed by Henry Fernbach in the style Moorish Revival, Central Synagogue is one of the oldest existing synagogue buildings in the United States and is the oldest synagogue in continuous use in New York City. For more information, please visit www.CentralSynagogue.org


Media Contact:


Bryanna Basilio


Bryanna.Basilio@MouthDigitalPR.com


(212) 260-7576


]]>
Carly Simon’s two sisters, Broadway composer Lucy Simon and opera singer Joanna Simon, died this week | app https://allanpettersson.org/carly-simons-two-sisters-broadway-composer-lucy-simon-and-opera-singer-joanna-simon-died-this-week-app/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 00:33:08 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/carly-simons-two-sisters-broadway-composer-lucy-simon-and-opera-singer-joanna-simon-died-this-week-app/ NEW YORK — Singer-songwriter Carly Simon is mourning the loss of her two sisters this week. Broadway composer Lucy Simon died of breast cancer on Thursday aged 82, and former opera singer Joanna Simon, 84, lost her battle with thyroid cancer the day before. × This page requires JavaScript. Javascript is required for you to […]]]>

NEW YORK — Singer-songwriter Carly Simon is mourning the loss of her two sisters this week.

Broadway composer Lucy Simon died of breast cancer on Thursday aged 82, and former opera singer Joanna Simon, 84, lost her battle with thyroid cancer the day before.

This page requires JavaScript.

Javascript is required for you to play premium content. Please enable it in your browser settings.

kAmq@C? :?E@ H62=E9 2D E96 49:=5C6? @$7:>@? U2>Aj $49FDE6C AF3=:D96C #:492C5 $:>@? 😕 }6H *@C< r:EJ 5FC:?8 E96 `hc_D[ 2== E9C66 D:3=:?8D H6C6 DF446DD7F= :? E96:C AC@76DD:@?2= >FD:4 AFCDF:ED]k^am

kAm{F4J$:>@? =2F?4965 96C >FD:4 42C66C:? E96 `he_D H96? D96 A6C7@C>65 2=@?8D:56 r2C=J:? vC66?H:49 ‘:==286 2?5 !C@G:?46E@H?[ |2DD249FD6EED] &?56C E96 >@?:<6C $:>@? $:DE6CD[ E96 5F@ C64@C565 E96 `hec D@?8 “(J?<6?[ q=J?<6? U2>Aj }@5” 32D65 @? tF86?6 u:6=5’D 49:=5C6?’D `ggh 49:=5C6?’D A@6>]k^am

kAmpD 2 D@=@ 2CE:DE[ E96 7@C>6C ?FCD:?8 D49@@= 2=F> H6?E @? E@ C64@C5 2=3F>D 😕 E96 >:5 `hf_D] $:>@? 4@AC@5F465 EH@ vC2>>J pH2C5 H:??:?8 49:=5C6?’D 2=3F>D — `hg`′D “x? w2C>@?Ji p $6D2>6 $EC66E #64@C5” 2?5 `hgb′D “w2C>@?J a″ — H:E9 96C 9FD32?5 s2G:5 {6G:?6]k ^ Am

kAmx? `hh`[ {F4J 4@>A@D65 E96 244=2:>65 qC@25H2J >FD:42= “%96 $64C6E v2C56?[” H9:49 =65 E@ 2 %@?J pH2C5 ?@>:?2E:@? 7@C 36DE @C:8:?2= D4@C6] *62CD =2E6C[ D96 4C27E65 E96 >FD:4 7@C E96 E962EC:42= 252AE2E:@? @7 q@C:D !2DE6C?2<’D 6A:4 ?@G6= “s@4E@C +9:G28@[” H9:49 =2?565 @? qC@25H2J 😕 a_`d]k^am

kAmy@2??2 $:>@?[ gc[ 82:?65 ?@E@C:6EJ 😕 E96 @A6C2 H@C=5 H:E9 2 A6C7@C>2?46 2?5 4@?46CE 42C66C E92E DA2??65 ?62C=J ad J62CD]k^am

kAm|2<:?8 96C 563FE 2E E96 }6H *@C< r:EJ ~A6C2 :? `hea 2D r96CF3:?@:? |@K2CE'D “|2CC:286 @7 u:82C@[” E96 >6KK@D@AC2?@ E@@< @? E96 E:EF=2C C@=6 :? E96 H@C=5 AC6>:6C6 @7 %9@>2D !2D2E:6C:’D “q=24< (:5@H” 2E E96 $62EE=6 ~A6C2 x? `hfa]k^am

kAmr2C=J$:>@?[ ff[ H9@ 😀 2=D@ 2 49:=5C6?jD 3@@< HC:E6C[ C@D6 E@ A@A >FD:4 DE2C5@> 😕 E96 `hf_D H:E9 2 DEC:?8 @7 9:ED :?4=F5:?8 “p?E:4:A2E:@?[” “*@F’C6 $@ ‘2:?” 2?5 “x w2G6?’E v@E %:>6 7@C E96 !2:?]”k ^ Am

kAm©a_aa }6H *@C< s2:=J }6HD]':D:E 2E k2 9C67lQ9EEADi^^HHH]?J52:=J?6HD]4@>Qm?J52:=J?6HD]4@ >k^2m]s:DEC:3FE65 3J %C:3F?6 r@?E6?E p86?4J[ {{r]k^am

Copyright 2022 Tribune Content Agency.

]]>
Qatari composer Dana Al Fardan https://allanpettersson.org/qatari-composer-dana-al-fardan/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/qatari-composer-dana-al-fardan/ The New Arab Meets: Qatari composer Dana Al Fardan, who has earned and cemented her place in the long line of cross-border artists who have made a name for themselves in the musical repertoire of the MENA region. Born and raised in Doha, Qatar, Dana Al-Fardan is a self-taught artist. She said The new Arabic […]]]>

The New Arab Meets: Qatari composer Dana Al Fardan, who has earned and cemented her place in the long line of cross-border artists who have made a name for themselves in the musical repertoire of the MENA region.

Born and raised in Doha, Qatar, Dana Al-Fardan is a self-taught artist.

She said The new Arabic that her childhood was simple in the 90s, a simplicity that made the connection with what mattered to her.

“There were no distractions or deviations from the one space that moved my whole being and characterized my relationship with the world: music,” she begins.

“My first memories revolved around two main places: the tennis club and our local CD and DVD store. Both places gave birth to my personal development with music. I used to play tennis at the federation almost daily after spending at least two of the hours on the grand piano in the club lobby, it was my regular pastime after school.

“Music is the lens through which I see the world. It’s the extra boost of energy when I’m exhausted, it’s transcendental strength when I’m feeling confined, and it’s magic when I want to m ‘get away. It’s beauty in everything I see around me’

Dana strikes a nostalgic chord reminding us of the days when we actively and consciously listened to music as an activity in its own right instead of adding music to the background of other activities, for her the CD store was the pillar around which everything revolved on weekends.

“Do you remember when people actually listened to albums? It wasn’t just something playing in the background while we were doing other things; listening to albums is what I used to do; it was the activity,” she said.

Music is the lens through which I see the world

Dana’s melodic signature is bounded by a complex and delicate blend of traditional and Western music, a blend that transcendentally dissolves all boundaries.

Each composition has a malleable sound sensation that is interpreted and shaped by each listener. Constantly reinvented through appreciation and immersion in a musical trance.

Dana Al Fardan in motion [photo credit: Jiliane Meriouch]

Dana spoke openly to The new Arabic on his intimate relationship with music. She evokes music as a lifeline and an essential companion to precious “moments of being”, to use Virginia Wolfe’s term.

Music is the lens through which I see the world. It’s the extra boost of energy when I’m exhausted, it’s the transcendental strength when I feel confined, and it’s the magic when I want to escape,” Dana explains.

“That’s the beauty of everything I see around me. That’s the spirit that my daughter solidified in me when I was pregnant with her. That’s when I realized that this passion wasn’t just a hobby, it was my true path”, and it was going to be the language of love between my daughter and me. It was my journey to myself, and it is the me that I want my daughter to get to know”, added the artist with emotion.

When we asked Dana about the influence she might have received from Arab composers, the answer did not fail to pay tribute to one of the greatest composers in the Arab world.

“Abdul Wahab is a composer who wrote many popular songs Um Kolthum music. He was often criticized for being too Western in his composition or for borrowing Western ines or melodies, but in reality what he did was create a fusion that would leave a lasting resonance far beyond. beyond his time. parts like 1001 nights are performed around the world and have received international recognition from Western and Arab listeners.

Dana has climbed many high mountains and even burst into uncharted territory of success.

If you’ve flown to or from Qatar on Qatar Airways, you’ve probably listened to its music during the flight. His finely soothing, yet fiercely expressive music of imperturbable tranquility is the gateway to Qatar.

The artist commented on this collaboration: “Qatar Airways represents a banner of growth and endless possibilities. It is one of the fastest growing airlines in the world and as such it was an incredibly inspiring project to write about. The music is literally meant to capture flight, elevation, dreams and magic. These are all the ingredients with which any composer would like to write. Qatar Airways has always held the arts in high regard and has always sponsored and supported local initiatives to push the performing arts to greater heights, so I was very grateful to have had this opportunity to present my work to two million passengers per month.

The music that dissolves borders

The artist spoke enthusiastically about his passion for local Qatari folk music and showcased the versatility of the multiple disciplines in this field.

His future projects will be a fusion between traditional Qatari singing, especially in the pearl fishing tradition of “Fiji” (music of the sea) with more universal/current sounds. Dana would make local music accessible to a wider audience.

The artist is no stranger to bringing Arab cultural heritage to Western audiences. The artist brought together east and west in a spectacular musical about the life of Jalal Eddine Rumi, which premiered in London.

She also had a successful adaptation of Jibran Khalil Jibran broken wingswhich was also in theaters in London.

broken wings was my first exercise in introducing this prolific figure of Arab descent to a West End audience,” she says. The New Arab. “It became my general mandate in my musical career; promote the rich art forms and literature derived from Arab heritage. Particularly figures of exceptional universal appeal like Gibran Khalil Gibran and Rumi. Although Gibran is widely known for his book The Prophet, little is known about the man. And that’s where we came across his book Bwings spread. In this novel, we understand all the elements that shape his thoughts and views in The Prophet and almost provide him with an origin story.

Indigo by Dana Al Fardan

Dana’s new show is a live performance featuring a chamber orchestra and a lighting designer projecting organized colored lights to transform the setting.

The artist spoke with The new Arabic about his vision for this project: “The idea is to raise your vibrational frequencies, so that each of the 12 traces has its own color palette and mood, and the live show will be a multi-sensory experience with a light show, performed by six musicians.

“All songs will have a corresponding video. These videos are conceptually and abstractly designed to allow the listener and viewing space to interpret and own this journey. I chose Indigo because of color and what that term stands for.” The human eye is relatively insensitive to Indigo frequencies. This is because Indigo resides in a space outside of your peripheral vision. It is commonly believed to be the color of wisdom and represents an understanding of your higher self.”

Indigo’s anguished, yet spirited eloquence will send listeners on an imaginative journey to lands of illicit romance and indomitable excitement, a sheer delight.

The artist hopes that audiences will come away with a greater sense of connectedness within themselves and develop more meaningful relationships in their surroundings after listening to his compositions.

To finish, The new Arabic wanted to know what makes an artist proud who has become the first Qatari woman to perform in English. The artist replied candidly, “I take great pride in persevering when challenges arise. It’s not easy being the first woman to do what I do, so I had to cultivate space and infrastructure as I went.

“I could have given up many times when it seemed impossible, and I still face seemingly impossible challenges, but most of all I’m proud of my propensity to never give up. It was never an option and never will be. never.”

Ouissal Harize is a UK-based freelance researcher, cultural essayist and journalist.

Follow her on Twitter: @OuissalHarize

]]>
Singer and songwriter Sirintip releases CARBON via Ropeadope https://allanpettersson.org/singer-and-songwriter-sirintip-releases-carbon-via-ropeadope/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 17:53:45 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/singer-and-songwriter-sirintip-releases-carbon-via-ropeadope/ After three years of climate research and patient self-discovery, Bangkok-born singer, producer and multimodal artist Sirintip releases her second album, carbon. Tired of preaching and scolding headlines, the internationally acclaimed Swedish-Thai composer sought a new method of engagement. carbon, out today via Ropeadope, features thirteen pieces of original music as a gesture of invitation, a […]]]>

After three years of climate research and patient self-discovery, Bangkok-born singer, producer and multimodal artist Sirintip releases her second album, carbon. Tired of preaching and scolding headlines, the internationally acclaimed Swedish-Thai composer sought a new method of engagement. carbon, out today via Ropeadope, features thirteen pieces of original music as a gesture of invitation, a call for a new kind of conversation around climate action.

“I didn’t want the project to preach, ‘You’re not good enough,'” the Manhattan-based artist says. “That’s what the news does. So I thought, ‘What if I don’t put the message in the lyrics? What if I compose it in the music? Then maybe people – including me – might become more curious about learning new ways for us to interact with our planet.'”

carbon would emerge as an ambitious and interdisciplinary work, linking visual art and moving image, as well as audiovisual installation. For the release of the music video for “plastic bird”, Sirintip received funding from the New York Foundation for the Arts, in addition to project support it received from the Swedish Arts Council, STEM, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council and the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology. Borrowing from the tradition of hip hop, the record features a number of found instruments, including plastic water jugs turned into percussion, processed recordings of backyard wildlife, even sand. “I’ve always been interested in nature and science,” says the 2015 Monk Competition finalist, who ultimately chose to pursue music over neurosurgery. “I think I’ve been working on this project subconsciously for a very long time.”

Communicating urgent messages in such a subtle way would require musical contributions from empathetic and visionary artists. Sirintip, who toured with Snarky Puppy and played with ABBA’s Benny Andersson, assembled a group of new voices, including Michael League on bass; Chris McQueen (“aqi”, “hydrogen”, “can’t escape”, “red-eye”, “unspoken gold”) and GRAMMY award-winning engineer and producer Nic Hard (“hydrogen”) on the guitar; Nolan Byrd on drums, plastic waste and programming; Daniel Migdal on violin and viola (“hostage”); Alex Hahn on flute (“plastic bird”); Owen Broder on baritone saxophone (“tacit gold”); and pianist Kengchakaj Kengkarnka who helped incorporate elements of Sirintip’s Thai heritage into the music. “During the pandemic, he figured out how to incorporate the traditional Thai 14-tone tuning into the Moog synthesizer,” she says.

The artists spent nine days at Manifold Recording Studios in North Carolina, taking full advantage of its carbon-neutral atmosphere and solar-powered location. “I love when I can live in a studio,” says Sirintip. “At Manifold, we lived in a guest house and worked from 9 or 10 a.m. until 2 or 3 a.m..” Meanwhile, they repurposed a container of Parmesan cheese as a bass drum and shaker, collected handfuls of sand from a nearby construction site, and outfitted the studio’s backyard with recording devices to capture crickets at dusk. “You can turn anything into music. It doesn’t have to be a musical instrument for you to make music with it.”

Music heavily influenced by research often features mathematical expression as a vehicle for artists to develop ideas and improvise. But carbon presents a suite of music through which science elevates Sirintip’s lyrical musicality. His compositions breathe. With purpose, they intensify. Her ability to communicate through mood-changing chambers and crystalline soundscapes transports listeners to sensory and emotional points that are both vast and intimate.

Two of carbon’s data-driven songs, “1.5” and “aqi,” weave stats into flourishing, melodious gestures. Inspired by information from the sonic data app Twotone, “1.5” expresses the planet’s steady temperature increase, drawing NASA data from 1880 to 2012,” Sirintip says. Instead of dialing in the linear increase, she identified different years that seemed important to her, exploring what each “looked like” and anchoring her composition around these selections. “aqi” engages an entirely different system for sonifying the data: “I decided to look at the data from another angle: the worse the air pollution, the more dissonant the interval; the better, the more harmonious.” The song features Kengkarnka’s Thai scale Moog, along with samples of traditional หมอลำ (Mor lam) chanting. Ending in a cloud of “reverb fog”, the music pays homage to many Thai women whom Sirintip sees as circumscribed and eager to break free from the norms that society imposes on them. “It’s as if they’re living their lives in the smog hanging over the city,” says “They can only see what those in power allow them to see; when you can’t see what else is, how can you free yourself from where you are?”

Throughout the album, figurative language serves up moments of tension and contemplation. Sirintip’s voice inhabits endangered tigers, man-made birds, even Mother Earth, giving an urgent voice to biodiversity. “red eyes” incorporates Thai drumming into distinct patterns and a towering groove that engages Sirintip’s dynamic expression. Hahn’s flute flies over sections of “the plastic bird,” which incorporates recyclables as well as rhythms from the Black Sicklebill’s courtship dance in the vocal loop up front. With locusts chirping outside the studio, “hostage” shines a light on Sirintip’s exposed vulnerability and serves as a solemn call for climate action. Composed for the dire aftermath of drought, “oasis” includes iterations of hard-hitting sand, while “unspoken gold” samples frogs singing after rain in Sirintip’s childhood yard in Bangkok.

Because she sees carbon as a call to action for herself as much as her listeners, Sirintip centers self-disclosure throughout the recording. The lyrics of “it’s okay” come from SMS between the artist and his best friend who died tragically at 28 years old. “The song’s connection to climate change is in the plastic instrumentation,” says Sirintip, “but the message is more universal: we don’t have to be perfect.”

That message, in part, is what the artist-songwriter hopes listeners will receive by engaging with carbon. “Climate change is something that affects everyone. It shouldn’t have to be ‘activist’ work,” says Sirintip, who seeks to unleash the project while creating as little impact as possible. She recently performed a solar-powered concert this summer and is currently researching strategies to tour more sustainably: “It’s hard to be perfect. We don’t currently have the infrastructure for all of us to live like Greta. But trying is so much better It all counts – understanding our personal carbon footprint so we can limit it, even something as simple as deleting 10 emails and unloading servers from powering information we don’t need. That’s what I try to capture every day, and what I hope to inspire others to consider when they hear this recording.”

carbon is now available on all streaming platforms.

]]>
Acclaimed singer and songwriter Sirintip tackles the climate crisis on ‘carbon’ (Ropeadope) https://allanpettersson.org/acclaimed-singer-and-songwriter-sirintip-tackles-the-climate-crisis-on-carbon-ropeadope/ Tue, 11 Oct 2022 17:46:17 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/acclaimed-singer-and-songwriter-sirintip-tackles-the-climate-crisis-on-carbon-ropeadope/ Acclaimed singer and songwriter Sirintip tackles the climate crisis on ‘carbon’ (Ropeadope) After three years of climate research and patient self-discovery, Bangkok-born singer, producer and multimodal artist Sirintip releases her second album, carbon. Tired of preaching and scolding headlines, the internationally acclaimed Swedish-Thai composer sought a new method of engagement. […]]]>




Acclaimed singer and songwriter Sirintip tackles the climate crisis on ‘carbon’ (Ropeadope)

After three years of climate research and patient self-discovery, Bangkok-born singer, producer and multimodal artist Sirintip releases her second album, carbon. Tired of preaching and scolding headlines, the internationally acclaimed Swedish-Thai composer sought a new method of engagement. carbon, which will be released on October 14, 2022 via Ropeadope, features thirteen pieces of original music as a gesture of invitation, a call for a new kind of conversation around climate action.

“I didn’t want the project to preach, ‘You’re not good enough,'” the Manhattan-based artist says. “That’s what the news does. So I thought, ‘What if I don’t put the message in the lyrics? What if I compose it in the music? We interact with our planet.'”

carbon would emerge as an ambitious and interdisciplinary work, linking visual art and moving image, as well as audiovisual installation. For the release of the “plastic bird” music video, Sirintip received funding from the New York Foundation for the Arts, in addition to project support it received from the Swedish Arts Council, STEM, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council and from the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology. Borrowing from the tradition of hip hop, the record features a number of found instruments, including plastic water jugs turned into percussion, processed recordings of backyard wildlife, even sand. “I’ve always been interested in nature and science,” says the 2015 Monk Competition finalist, who ultimately chose to pursue music over neurosurgery. “I think I’ve been working on this project subconsciously for a very long time.”

Communicating urgent messages in such a subtle way would require musical contributions from empathetic and visionary artists. Sirintip, who toured with Snarky Puppy and played with ABBA’s Benny Andersson, assembled a group of new voices, including Michael League on bass; Chris McQueen (“aqi”, “”hydrogen”, “I can’t escape”, “”red eyes”, “”unspoken gold”) and GRAMMY award-winning engineer and producer Nic Hard (” hydrogen”) on guitar; Nolan Byrd on drums, plastic waste and programming; Daniel Migdal on violin and viola (“hostage”); Alex Hahn on flute (“plastic bird”); Owen Broder on saxophone baritone (“unspoken gold”); and pianist Kengchakaj Kengkarnka who helped incorporate elements of Sirintip’s Thai heritage into the music. “During the pandemic, he figured out how to incorporate the traditional Thai 14-tone tuning into the Moog synthesizer,” she says.

The artists spent nine days at Manifold Recording Studios in North Carolina, taking full advantage of its carbon-neutral atmosphere and solar-powered location. “I love when I can live in a studio,” says Sirintip. “At Manifold, we lived in a guest house and worked from 9 or 10 a.m. until 2 or 3 a.m..” Meanwhile, they repurposed a container of Parmesan cheese as a bass drum and shaker, collected handfuls of sand from a nearby construction site, and outfitted the studio’s backyard with recording devices to capture crickets at dusk. “You can turn anything into music. It doesn’t have to be a musical instrument for you to make music with it.”

Music heavily influenced by research often features mathematical expression as a vehicle for artists to develop ideas and improvise. But carbon presents a suite of music through which science elevates Sirintip’s lyrical musicality. His compositions breathe. With purpose, they intensify. Her ability to communicate through mood-changing chambers and crystalline soundscapes transports listeners to sensory and emotional points that are both vast and intimate.

Two of Carbon’s data-driven songs, “1.5” and “aqi,” weave stats into flourishing, melodious gestures. Inspired by information from the sonic data app Twotone, “1.5” expresses the planet’s steady temperature increase, drawing NASA data from 1880 to 2012,” Sirintip says. Instead of dialing in the linear increase, she identified different years that seemed important to her, exploring what each “looked like” and anchored her composition around these selections. “aqi” engages an entirely different system for sonifying the data: “I decided to look at the data from another angle: the worse the air pollution, the more dissonant the interval; the better, the more harmonious.” The song features Kengkarnka’s Thai scale Moog, along with samples of traditional หมอลำ (Mor lam) chanting. Ending in a cloud of “reverb fog”, the music pays homage to many Thai women whom Sirintip sees as circumscribed and eager to break free from the norms society imposes on them. “It’s as if they’re living their lives in the smog hanging over the city,” says “They can only see what those in power allow them to see; when you can’t see what else is, how can you free yourself from where you are?”

Throughout the album, figurative language serves up moments of tension and contemplation. Sirintip’s voice inhabits endangered tigers, man-made birds, even Mother Earth, giving an urgent voice to biodiversity. “red eyes” incorporates Thai drumming into distinct patterns and a towering groove that engages Sirintip’s dynamic expression. Hahn’s flute flies over sections of “the plastic bird,” which incorporates recyclables as well as rhythms from the Black Sicklebill’s courtship dance in the vocal loop up front. With locusts chirping outside the studio, “hostage” shines a light on Sirintip’s exposed vulnerability and serves as a solemn call for climate action. Composed for the dire aftermath of drought, “oasis” includes iterations of hard-hitting sand, while “unspoken gold” samples frogs singing after rain in Sirintip’s childhood yard in Bangkok.

Because she sees carbon as a call to action for herself as much as her listeners, Sirintip centers self-disclosure throughout the recording. The lyrics of “it’s okay” come from SMS between the artist and his best friend who died tragically at 28 years old. “The song’s connection to climate change is in the plastic instrumentation,” says Sirintip, “but the message is more universal: we don’t have to be perfect.”

That message, in part, is what the artist-songwriter hopes listeners will receive by engaging with carbon. “Climate change is something that affects everyone. It shouldn’t have to be ‘activist’ work,” says Sirintip, who seeks to unleash the project while creating as little impact as possible. She recently performed a solar-powered concert this summer and is currently researching strategies to tour more sustainably: “It’s hard to be perfect. We don’t currently have the infrastructure for all of us to live like Greta. But trying is so much better It all counts – understanding our personal carbon footprint so we can limit it, even something as simple as deleting 10 emails and unloading servers from powering information we don’t need every day, and what I hope to inspire others to consider when they hear this recording.”

##

Track list:
1. hydrogen (2:43)
2. Aqi (3:37)
3. Oasis (3:59)
4. Hostage (2:59)
5. red eyes (4:05)
6.1.5 (2:02)
7. unspoken gold (4:06)
8. I can’t escape (3:24)
9. plastic bird (3:51)
10. Stranger of the Sea (1:29)
11. earth moment (4:18)
12. it’s okay (3:33)
13. Siri (1:58)

write your comments on the article :: © 2022 Jazz News :: home page

]]>
Composer Laurie Shenoda joins KOM https://allanpettersson.org/composer-laurie-shenoda-joins-kom/ Tue, 11 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/composer-laurie-shenoda-joins-kom/ KOM is delighted to welcome Laurie Shenoda to its songwriting family for exclusive commercial work. Laurie is a top songwriter and producer with a long-standing relationship with KOM. A classically trained musician and multi-instrumentalist with a flair for contemporary production, Laurie’s work seamlessly straddles the worlds of classical and modern music, combining an instinctive ability […]]]>

KOM is delighted to welcome Laurie Shenoda to its songwriting family for exclusive commercial work. Laurie is a top songwriter and producer with a long-standing relationship with KOM. A classically trained musician and multi-instrumentalist with a flair for contemporary production, Laurie’s work seamlessly straddles the worlds of classical and modern music, combining an instinctive ability to convey emotion through instrumentation, with a vast knowledge of style and genre. As part of his artist project ‘Shenoda’, his singles
have been awarded BBC Radio 1’s coveted “Hottest Record in the World” title.

Laurie joins KOM with a wealth of screenwriting experience. Some of his recent collaborations include work with directors such as Megaforce (Rhianna, Madonna, D&AD, Cannes Lions, Clios Winners), Ian Pons Jewell (UKMVA, MOBO, Brit Award winner), Jonas Lindstroem (Kendrick Lamar, Beyonce) , Steve Rogers (British Arrows, Cannes Lions, D&AD Award winner) and Felix Brady (British Arrows, D&AD Award winner). He has scored global campaigns for brands including Levi’s, Nike, Samsung, Amazon and Calvin Klein and film projects such as ‘A Mother’s Love’, part of the BAFTA nominated Channel 4 film series ‘On The Edge’. “.

Jorik Dory & Sil Van der Woerd (AKA Studio Birthplace) said, “Working with Laurie was a very smooth and enjoyable process. He managed to capture the emotion of the narrative and elevate the film with a lush cinematic score. His sensitivity was exactly what we were hoping for for this film and we couldn’t be more excited about the end result!

You can check out Laurie’s recent acclaimed work for Birthplace Studio below.


]]>
Weekend Picks: Land of 10,000 Laughs, a showcase of black composers, a craft market https://allanpettersson.org/weekend-picks-land-of-10000-laughs-a-showcase-of-black-composers-a-craft-market/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 15:34:28 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/weekend-picks-land-of-10000-laughs-a-showcase-of-black-composers-a-craft-market/ Everyone deserves to laugh once in a while. Luckily, opportunities to do just that abound this weekend as comics from across the country infiltrate the Twin Cities. Also this weekend, the American Craft Council’s St. Paul Marketplace, which recently rebranded as “American Craft Made,” heads to the RiverCentre, with lovingly created items to bring beauty […]]]>

Everyone deserves to laugh once in a while. Luckily, opportunities to do just that abound this weekend as comics from across the country infiltrate the Twin Cities. Also this weekend, the American Craft Council’s St. Paul Marketplace, which recently rebranded as “American Craft Made,” heads to the RiverCentre, with lovingly created items to bring beauty to your home. And, the Minnesota Orchestra spotlights black composers, Interact Center recalls the Great Depression, Swedish and Minnesota music musicians find common beats, and Public Functionary makes its official return.

10,000 laughs

The Twin Cities are getting an infusion of comedy as the 10,000 Laughs festival hits beer halls, theaters, bars and clubs. Nearly 80 comedians will perform over the three days, with nationally touring comic shows that also feature local comedians. Catch the biting, soft-spoken commentary from Mary Mack at the Southern Theater, identical twins the Sklar Brothers, formerly of the ESPN Classic show “Cheap Seats” at the Parkway Theater, and former New York-based and Late Night indie comic Carmen Lagala TV at Comedy Corner Underground, Sisyphus Brewing and Palmers. Find more laughs throughout the festival at The Cedar and The Red Sea. From Thursday, October 6 to Saturday, October 8 ($20). More information here.

The article continues after the ad

American Craft Council

Work by Fred Kaemmer

Head to the RiverCentre this weekend to browse beautiful handmade items at American Craft Made, hosted by the American Craft Council. In the market, artists and craftsmen will sell ceramics, glass objects, jewellery, clothing, furniture, etc. Formerly called the American Craft Show, American Craft Made features more than 150 artists from across the country. When you’re there, look for Loriene Pearson, Ger Xiong, and Enyo Farabi, three BIPOC artists from the American Craft Council’s new Emerging Artists Scholarship program, supported by the Windgate Foundation and the Harlan Bass Foundation for the Arts. Hmong artist Ger Xiong makes jewelry and textiles, and his recent work uses traditional embroidery in contemporary pieces. Enyo Farabi, whose parents are Iranian and Puerto Rican, makes jewelry with materials like metal, stone and woods, while Winnebago artist Loriene Pearson specializes in new ways to explore Winnebago appliqué designs . The scholarship is part of the American Craft Council’s ongoing efforts to expand the field to include artists from diverse communities and backgrounds. Friday, Oct. 7 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 8 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 9 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the RiverCentre in Saint-Paul ($10). More information here.

The Listening Project

Kensho Watanabe

Photo by Irina Belashov

Kensho Watanabe

Guest conductor Kensho Watanabe joins the Minnesota Orchestra for the Listening Project, a concert and recording session that highlights six works by black composers never before performed by the orchestra. Hosted by Dr. Louise Toppin, a professor at the University of Michigan School of Music, the concert features jazz-inspired classical music pieces, such as Hale Smith’s “Contours,” and a collection of arranged African-American spirituals. by American composer Margaret Bonds. Bass-baritone soloist Christopher Humbert Jr. will perform in the Bonds play and will also sing in Samuel Coleridge-Taylor’s “Idyll.” Jamaican-born composer Eleanor Alberga, Adolphus Hailstork and the great Florence Price are also featured. Friday, October 7 at 8 p.m. at Orchestra Hall ($32). More information here.

We are always here

Interact Center for Visual and Performing Arts travels back in time to the Great Depression for its latest production, telling the story of a Chicago newspaper grappling with the difficult social and economic landscape while facing its own internal issues. . With original music by Aaron Gabriel, the work finds parallels to recent and current events, with large-cast numbers and jaw-dropping song and dance. Friday, Oct. 7–October 29, 7 p.m. at the Luminary Arts Center ($18-25). More information here.

JAERV + The OK Factor

JAERV + The OK Factor

JAERV + The OK factor at ASI

Local string duo The OK Factor continue their fruitful collaboration with Swedish folk quintet JAERV at the American Swedish Institute this week, for their upbeat program, “Traditions”. The two bands first performed together in 2017, when the OK Factor opened for JAERV at the Cedar Cultural Center. The musicians got on well and have, in the years since, delved deeper into their later traditions, including visits to Scandinavia to play and study. Friday, October 7 at 7 p.m. at the American Swedish Institute ($35). More information here.

Smoke and soil

It’s been three years since Public Functionary left its space on Buchanan Street in northeast Minneapolis, a hub for flashy contemporary art exhibits and the city’s best art parties. In the years that followed, PF was always active, particularly in the development of PF Studios, a program featuring emerging BIPOC artists. This week, PF officially reopens in the Northrop King Building, in a show featuring artists from the PF Studios program. Adrienne Doyle is serving as guest curator for the exhibition, who will also contribute a zine for the exhibition. Opening Saturday, Oct. 8 from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m., until Nov. 6 (free). More information here.

]]>
Composer Shushan Sarkissian will write music for a film possibly starring Scarlett Johansson and Catherine Deneuve https://allanpettersson.org/composer-shushan-sarkissian-will-write-music-for-a-film-possibly-starring-scarlett-johansson-and-catherine-deneuve/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/composer-shushan-sarkissian-will-write-music-for-a-film-possibly-starring-scarlett-johansson-and-catherine-deneuve/ Composer Shushan Sarkissian will write music for a film possibly starring Scarlett Johansson and Catherine Deneuve 10:27, October 6, 2022 YEREVAN, OCTOBER 6, ARMENPRESS. Composing and selecting the right music for a movie is crucial as it can change the tone and mood of a movie. Armenian composer Shushan Sargsyan has just concluded her […]]]>

Composer Shushan Sarkissian will write music for a film possibly starring Scarlett Johansson and Catherine Deneuve


YEREVAN, OCTOBER 6, ARMENPRESS. Composing and selecting the right music for a movie is crucial as it can change the tone and mood of a movie.

Armenian composer Shushan Sargsyan has just concluded her trip to the Venice Film Festival. Before that, she frequented the Marché du Film at the Cannes Film Festival to meet filmmakers and studios and present her work.

“The role of music in cinema is very important. We can say that the composer is the second man in the film. If you were to watch the same movie with and without the score, you would feel a huge difference,” songwriter Shushan Sargsyan told ARMENPRESS. “A wonderful scene could die if you select the wrong piece of music. My goal and desire is to do my job so well that the music will stand out from the film and have a life of its own.

“I have several offers. I have an agreement with one of the film studios in Dubai. The project interests me. The combination of East and West is very interesting to me,” Sarkissian said, without revealing more details for now. “I also have agreements with film studios in Taiwan, Mongolia and Ukraine. There will be both feature films and documentaries.

Perhaps one of the best deals right now is a joint US-EU production film that could star French actress Catherine Deneuve. Negotiations are also underway with American actress Scarlett Johansson. Shushan Sargsyan’s participation in the film is confirmed, but the deadlines are not yet available.

Sargsyan has worked with many Armenian singers in his country such as Anna Khachatryan, Masha Mnjoyan, Ani Christie, Sona Shahgeldyan, Syuzanna Melkonyan, Tigran Petrosyan and others.

The composer also collaborated with many Ukrainian stars. In Ukraine, she is perhaps best known for authoring the music to Золоті Ворота (Golden Gates), a song dubbed the “second anthem” of Ukraine. She also works with Italian operatic tenor Alessandro Safina.

Angela Hambardzumyan

]]>
COFFEE BREAK | Swedish composer Fredrik Gran writes cello music for sentient robots https://allanpettersson.org/coffee-break-swedish-composer-fredrik-gran-writes-cello-music-for-sentient-robots/ Tue, 04 Oct 2022 13:51:41 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/coffee-break-swedish-composer-fredrik-gran-writes-cello-music-for-sentient-robots/ Image of Ri Butov’s cello (CC0C/Pixabay) Swedish composer Fredrik Gran has been writing music for robots for a few years. His Cello Concerto No. 1 (2019) was commissioned by renowned Swedish contemporary music ensemble KammarensembleN (SE) and sponsored by the Swedish Arts Council and KUKA Robotics. As Gran describes it: “The ‘cellist robot’, a non-human […]]]>
Image of Ri Butov’s cello (CC0C/Pixabay)

Swedish composer Fredrik Gran has been writing music for robots for a few years. His Cello Concerto No. 1 (2019) was commissioned by renowned Swedish contemporary music ensemble KammarensembleN (SE) and sponsored by the Swedish Arts Council and KUKA Robotics.

As Gran describes it:

“The ‘cellist robot’, a non-human entity at the intersection of performer and instrument, consists of two industrial robotic arms playing the cello. The composition explores the specific and unique playing techniques offered by this system, underlines the idiomatic potential of the robot cellist and studies its anthropomorphic characteristics and their scenographic implications. The robot cellist has developed an individual playing style and techniques as well as a reflective compositional perspective.

The project is underway, and Gran recently released a video demonstrating the capabilities of the robot cellist. You can judge his talents for yourself.

Gran uses the same type of robot found in automobile assembly lines, which already require a certain dexterity. The robot arms can also rosin their bows and tune the instrument. He programmed them to be sensitive enough to play with subtlety and dynamic range, and sometimes duets with them. He has also written for robot contrabass.

His robot cellists maintain an enviable concert schedule in his native Sweden, sometimes playing with other instrumentalists.

Who is Fredrick Gran?

After initial studies at the Academy of Music in Stockholm, Gran completed his doctoral research at McGill university in Montreal in conjunction with the Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Music, Media and Technology.

Gran’s works have been performed widely at festivals and concerts across Scandinavia and Europe, as well as in Tokyo. He has worked with ballet and opera companies, as well as orchestras and chamber ensembles.

And robots.

#LUDWIGVAN

Get daily art news straight to your inbox.

Sign up for the Ludwig van Daily — classical music and opera in five minutes or less HERE.

Latest posts by Anya Wassenberg (see everything)

]]>