Swedish violinist – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 13:08:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://allanpettersson.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-19-120x120.png Swedish violinist – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ 32 32 Adorable Moment of Little Girl Kissing Violinist Melts Viewers’ Hearts https://allanpettersson.org/adorable-moment-of-little-girl-kissing-violinist-melts-viewers-hearts/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 10:03:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/adorable-moment-of-little-girl-kissing-violinist-melts-viewers-hearts/ A little girl’s adorable reaction to a violinist melted viewers’ hearts. Australian musician Melissa Voyias shared a clip of herself performing “Hey Brother” by the late Swedish electronic artist Avicii to guests at a wedding reception in Sydney last month on her TikTok account. The musician, who specializes in classical and electric violin performances, was […]]]>

A little girl’s adorable reaction to a violinist melted viewers’ hearts.

Australian musician Melissa Voyias shared a clip of herself performing “Hey Brother” by the late Swedish electronic artist Avicii to guests at a wedding reception in Sydney last month on her TikTok account.

The musician, who specializes in classical and electric violin performances, was playing the piece when she spotted the “cutest little wedding guest” staring intently at her rendition.

As Voyias came to the end of the song, the little girl was so moved by the performance that she immediately ran up to her and hugged her, before the violinist leaned over to chat with the whole- little.

According to a 2017 review published in Frontiers in Psychologymusic can improve learning abilities and encourage cognitive development in children, particularly by aiding functions such as planning, working memory, inhibition and flexibility.

Sydney violinist Melissa Voyias. The musician delighted viewers by sharing a video of a little girl delighted with her performance
violinbymel

The report suggests that music can benefit a child’s educational needs by providing a mode of self-expression and an outlet for emotions.

Voyias started her own musical journey at the age of 5 and from an early age she would prepare a piece of music to play on the violin for each member of the family as a Christmas present.

The footage was originally shared on musician violonbymel’s TikTok page, where it received 2.8 million views. It has since been reposted on Reddit, where it garnered over 400 comments and 59,000 votes.

In the clip’s captions, Voyias wrote, “I was performing one of my favorite Avicii tracks, when I spotted the cutest little wedding guest. Wait for her reaction!”

The camera then turned to the little girl, who stood in a white dress, delighted with the performance, before running up and squeezing the musician’s leg.

Users were wowed by the footage, with many calling the clip “beautiful” and saying how moving it was to see a child so inspired by the performance.

“It’s amazing the impact a moment like this could have 🙂 she might be inspired to become a musician herself,” one wrote.

“It’s crazy to think that we are most likely witnessing a little human’s first emotional reaction to music, a usually private thing that everyone has experienced,” another user said.

A third commented, “Literally everything about this video is beautiful. The violin, the vibe, the people, the music…love it!”

“What makes me think is that this particular moment probably defined the whole life of the little girl,” said another.

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Accomplished violinist and Liberty teacher shares his family’s plight in Soviet Latvia and plays a special anthem for his Ukrainian neighbors » Liberty News https://allanpettersson.org/accomplished-violinist-and-liberty-teacher-shares-his-familys-plight-in-soviet-latvia-and-plays-a-special-anthem-for-his-ukrainian-neighbors-liberty-news/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 16:56:58 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/accomplished-violinist-and-liberty-teacher-shares-his-familys-plight-in-soviet-latvia-and-plays-a-special-anthem-for-his-ukrainian-neighbors-liberty-news/ Liberty University Associate Professor of Music Dr. Yevgeniy Dovgalyuk From his native Latvia to Lynchburg, Virginia, Liberty University Associate Professor of Music Dr. Yevgeniy Dovgalyuk continues to use his talents for the glory of God, whether on stage or in the classroom. Dovgalyuk is a world-renowned violinist who has performed at leading concert halls in […]]]>
Liberty University Associate Professor of Music Dr. Yevgeniy Dovgalyuk

From his native Latvia to Lynchburg, Virginia, Liberty University Associate Professor of Music Dr. Yevgeniy Dovgalyuk continues to use his talents for the glory of God, whether on stage or in the classroom.

Dovgalyuk is a world-renowned violinist who has performed at leading concert halls in the United States and Europe, including Latvia, Sweden, United Kingdom, Ukraine and Russia. He was a substitute violinist with the National Symphony Orchestra for many years and has performed with some of the world’s greatest artists including Yo-Yo Ma, Joshua Bell, Gidon Kremer, Wynton Marsalis, Stevie Wonder, The Gettys, Michael W. Smith , Amy Grant, Martina McBride and many more.

“These are incredible experiences and opportunities,” he said. “World-renowned artists perform in big venues, and many of those gigs have taken place at Capital One Arena in Washington DC. Performing in front of a sold-out crowd is always a big thrill.”

Dovgalyuk is the recipient of numerous performance awards, including Distinguished Principal Violin of the Piedmont Symphony Orchestra, Assistantship in Ensembles at the University of Maryland, George Mason University Conductor’s Award, among others. He has also been concertmaster with various orchestras throughout his career. In 2017 he was named Principal Violin of the Lynchburg Symphony Orchestra, a position he still holds today.

Dovgalyuk was born in Latvia in 1980 and immigrated with his parents and three siblings to the United States when he was 11 years old due to oppression from the Soviet Union.

“It was quite an ordeal to get out of the Soviet Union at that time,” he said. “We were able to come out of there with a church and a sponsoring family in the United States. But it was basically my grandfather’s faith and vision that brought us to America in the first place.”

Years earlier, his grandfather refused to renounce Christ and was taken to a concentration camp in Siberia where he was confined to coal mining for 12 years. He was released only after changes at the head of government.

Dovgalyuk still remembers his grandfather’s stories and says they fueled his own spiritual life.

“In my relationship with the Lord, I draw so much from my family’s heritage. It spans generations. It didn’t start with me; it starts with my grandfather. I know what he did and how faithful he was in the face of death. It’s really inspiring for me personally.

Due to the turmoil and uncertainty caused by the breakup of the Soviet Union, Dovgalyuk’s parents wished to raise their children in a country where they would find religious freedom and career opportunities.

Shortly after immigrating to the United States, a new friend of his mother’s, a missionary who happened to be a member of the National Symphony Orchestra, came to their home and heard the children playing their instruments. Soon after, she helped assign them to some of the best music teachers in the area.

Dovgalyuk performing with the National Wind Symphony Orchestra

At the age of 17, Dovgalyuk became a member of the National Symphony Orchestra and received a scholarship to study music at George Mason University.

“It was amazing how the Lord arranged it,” he said. “I was able to go without taking out a loan and I was able to continue living at home with my parents.”

After completing his bachelor’s and master’s degrees at George Mason, Dovgalyuk earned his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in violin performance from the University of Maryland while continuing to perform with artists and orchestras in the Washington, D.C., area. and along the east coast, mainly. In 2016, while looking for a more consistent job to support his growing family, he came across Liberty, where he was hired as an adjunct teacher teaching applied violin lessons. He traveled to Liberty two days a week and was hired full-time a year later when he moved to Lynchburg with his wife, Kate, and their two children, Misha and Aliya.

Doygaluk continued to play with the National Symphony Orchestra as a backup, often performing at the Kennedy Center in Washington.

“I love going to play with them,” he said. “Most of them are really my friends now, and I’ve been playing with some of them since 2014.”

One of Dovgalyuk’s favorite memories with the orchestra was somewhat of a foreshadowing of his future with Liberty. In 2014, he joined Michael W. Smith (current director of the Center for Commercial Music at the School of Music) at the Kennedy Center for an evening of worship.

“That memory was and still is so special in my mind. It’s sealed forever in my memory bank,” he said.

Dovgalyuk and Smith have since had the chance to speak when Smith visits campus and teaches students.

“I chatted with him a few times and reminisced with him about that gig,” Dovgalyuk said.

As impressed as he was with Liberty’s excellence in all academic areas, Dovgalyuk said he greatly appreciated the school’s mission to prioritize spiritual well-being as well as advancement. professional.

Dovgalyuk helping lead worship at a church in 2019

“Shortly after I arrived at Liberty, I was talking with one of the leaders of the School of Music and I remember him saying to me, ‘Remember, the purpose of Liberty’s mission is is not only to train excellent violinists, but also to Forming Champions for Christsaid Dovgalyuk. “Then he said, ‘You are encouraged to pray with your students and connect with them on a personal level and care for them spiritually.'”

“It’s amazing because I can find out what’s going on in my students’ lives and what they’re comfortable sharing,” he added. “We can pray for these things, including their musical pursuits and other life pursuits.”

Recently, in an effort to raise awareness for those suffering in Ukraine, where some of his relatives reside, Dovgalyuk and some of his students performed “Melody”, by the late Ukrainian composer Myroslav Skoryk, on the violin for a video that the School of Music posted on his social media pages. The play was written in 1981 by Skoryk to convey his understanding of tragedy and his deep sadness. It has since become the spiritual anthem of Ukraine.

“It was such a powerful project to work on,” he said. “The students prepared and performed so well.”

Many of Dovgalyuk’s relatives reside in areas of Ukraine that have so far been spared the ongoing brutal Russian invasion.

“My family is unscathed but (Liberty) joins the global community of believers in prayer in this tragic and devastating war,” he said.

Besides classical music like Skoryk’s Anthem, Dovgalyuk also enjoys other genres.

“It’s true that I have a classical education and that I like classical music, he says, but I also like all kinds of genres and one of the main values ​​of the School of Music is diversity. stylistic. I really like it because we have to be able to play different genres to be complete musicians.

In addition to teaching and assisting the Lynchburg Symphony Orchestra, the North Carolina Symphony Orchestra, and making occasional appearances with the National Symphony Orchestra, Doygalyuk was recently appointed Minister of Music at Core Street United Methodist Church in downtown Lynchburg.

“It also brought a great opportunity to continue learning more about the field of worship music,” he said, “and what worship is and how to engage people…how to share God through music and point them in that direction to him in everything we do.

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Ukraine refugee story: Violinist talks about a new life in Berkhamsted – ‘Incredible’ | United Kingdom | New https://allanpettersson.org/ukraine-refugee-story-violinist-talks-about-a-new-life-in-berkhamsted-incredible-united-kingdom-new/ Wed, 25 May 2022 09:43:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/ukraine-refugee-story-violinist-talks-about-a-new-life-in-berkhamsted-incredible-united-kingdom-new/ Nikita Vikhorev plays the violin at the London Performing Academy of Music He loves fish and chips and thinks haggis is “very tasty”, but says “milk tea” is “something very strange to me”. He’s a huge fan of Irish folk music (“it’s very popular in Ukraine,” he says) and is looking forward to visiting Dublin […]]]>

Nikita Vikhorev plays the violin at the London Performing Academy of Music

He loves fish and chips and thinks haggis is “very tasty”, but says “milk tea” is “something very strange to me”. He’s a huge fan of Irish folk music (“it’s very popular in Ukraine,” he says) and is looking forward to visiting Dublin for a dance festival, as well as trips to Stonehenge, Nottingham and Edinburgh.

The classically trained violinist has already seen the sights of London, from the Houses of Parliament to Covent Garden and “the bridge from Harry Potter”. And he’s a big fan of the BBC series Sherlock Holmes with Benedict Cumberbatch, so of course a visit to Baker Street was a must.

He describes his new home as being like something out of a “detective show, like Midsummer Murders, Mrs Marple and Inspector Linley”. Hopefully without the crime levels, we were joking.

“It’s beautiful here,” he told me. “My host family is adorable. They gave me a room, food and they really helped me here. The support of these people is something unimaginable, just thank you for Ian and Yvonne, they are really beautiful people.

“I saw so many places, Westminster, Big Ben. I planned to visit the Globe Theatre. It’s something impossible, incredible, that I live in Britain, this house, this town. It’s beautiful.”

However, none of this would have been possible without Dr. Stefania Passamonte. Stefania is Nikita’s manager at the London Performing Academy of Music (LPMAM) where he continues his studies in jazz and classical music now that he is in the UK.

Ever since war broke out, Stefania has worked tirelessly to bring young Ukrainian musicians to the UK and give them a new chance at life.

Nikita was one of the first she was able to help. The 21-year-old violinist fled Kharkiv where he was in his second year of university and went with a friend to his parents’ home in Odessa after the start of the war with Russia.

Ukrainian refugee Nikita Vikorev is an extremely talented violist (Image: LPMAM)

Stefania helped arrange a military exemption document for him, allowing the young musician to travel through Moldova, Hungary, Romania and then Switzerland, where he spent a month waiting for his visa and correct documents, before to finally arrive in the UK.

So far, Stefania has managed to get 10 students to safety, but her job is not done. After the start of the war, the University of Kharkiv was bombed, leaving the future of many students “in shreds”.

She was desperate to help create the Ukrainian Scholarship Fund for Refugee Students, offering support for gifted students to leave their homes and funding to travel to Britain, where they are housed and have the opportunity to study.

They have received considerable help so far, but there are still 25 more to make the trip, Stefania said.

Nikita Vikorev

I spoke to Nikita Vikorev on Zoom to find out how he finds life in the UK (Picture: EXPRESS)

Stefania Passamonte

Stefania Passamonte’s passion for trying to help these students is inspiring (Picture: EXPRESS)

How you can help Ukrainian refugees

“The problem is that you keep them, but where do you put them? It’s not just about getting them out, it’s also about finding them a safe place to live and then funding their education, because unfortunately that’s expensive.

“I’ve been so lucky to have the job I have, with the Board of the British Phonographic Industry (BPI). They said to write a blog and that blog was shared and retweeted by the musicians union [which is how Ian and Yvonne, Nikita’s hosts, came to being involved]they contacted me and offered to open their houses to musicians.

Under this scheme, Nikita and other musicians like him are given a vital chance, for which he is immensely grateful to Stefania – and all those who helped bring him to Britain.

But for Stefania, Nikita is her “hero”. “He did everything and even more to save the other girls, to get them out of the country, it was amazing. I went to Nikita and said help me, so he worked hard, wrote to d other people, shared my email.

“I didn’t do it myself, I did it thanks to people like Nikita. I started it but I wouldn’t have been here if I hadn’t had everyone show up.

Nikita Vikorev holding a violin

Nikita can’t wait to perform at Berkofest on June 2 (Image: LPMAM)

Looking ahead, Nikita hopes the war in Ukraine will soon be over and says he is looking forward to becoming a British citizen.

But above all, he hopes to be able to see his family again. Her older sister remains in Ukraine with her husband and young son, while her parents and younger sister are safe in Gothenburg, Sweden.

They keep in touch regularly, he says, and he hopes to visit his mother and father next month. “And when I can, I want to invite them to my house for a while, as a guest, to show them London, and Berkhamsted of course because it’s a very beautiful city.”

“I really miss them,” he added.

As for his sister, he hopes that she and her family are safe and can be reunited soon. He said, “They live in a quiet town, they don’t have any bombs, and I think everything will be fine.

“We talk sometimes when we can, because she’s a photographer and she has commissions, and she has a little boy so it’s difficult. But we talk on WhatsApp or Telegram.

But for now, Nikita is filling her calendar with performances in Britain – including one at the annual meeting BerkoFest festival in Berkhamsted, which is organized by founder Charlie Hussey to coincide with this year’s Platinum Jubilee.

Although Charlie had never met Stefania before this year, he went out of his way to support her work and help Nikita settle into her new home. from taking him to local concert venues to asking him to play at the upcoming event, which will be held on June 2, he’s been a real rock for the young musician.

Charlie says he is looking forward to hearing Nikita perform at the festival, which is now in its 10th year. “To have someone so talented play for us…it’s an incredible honour.”

Royal Opera singers Phillip Brown and Kathryn Jenkin are also booked, and all money will be donated to local charities including Age UK Dacorum.

Tickets to the event – which is supported by Berkhamsted City Council – starts at £3 for students, £5 for concessions and £15 for adults, and you can find more information or book tickets at BerkoFest website.

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13-year-old Egyptian-Hungarian violinist Mariam Abouzahra wins the “Golden Note” in Austria – Music – Arts & Culture https://allanpettersson.org/13-year-old-egyptian-hungarian-violinist-mariam-abouzahra-wins-the-golden-note-in-austria-music-arts-culture/ Wed, 25 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/13-year-old-egyptian-hungarian-violinist-mariam-abouzahra-wins-the-golden-note-in-austria-music-arts-culture/ News of Mariam’s victory was shared by her father on his Facebook page. Mariam’s victory comes just months after winning silver at the Nutcracker International Television Competition for Young Musicians. The Golden Note is a classical music program broadcast by the Austrian Broadcasting Corporation (ORF), which is Austria’s largest media provider, operating four national television […]]]>

News of Mariam’s victory was shared by her father on his Facebook page.

Mariam’s victory comes just months after winning silver at the Nutcracker International Television Competition for Young Musicians.

The Golden Note is a classical music program broadcast by the Austrian Broadcasting Corporation (ORF), which is Austria’s largest media provider, operating four national television channels and twelve radio channels.

Competing with dozens of other young performers, the teenage musical prodigy reached the final along with eight other performers aged 10 to 16.

This year, the competition welcomed young talents to perform on string instruments, on the piano, as well as on wind instruments.

In the final, Abouzahra performed “Saber Dance” from Aram Khachaturian’s ballet Gayane.

A stable of classical music, sword dancing is very difficult work for a musician, requiring high skill and testing the abilities of performers.

The competition jury included renowned names from the classical music scene, such as baritone Clemens Unterreiner; violinist Lidia Baich; and Rebecca Horner, principal dancer of the Vienna State Ballet Company.

The final competition and the special gala were broadcast on the ORF 2 television channel on May 21.

Born to a Hungarian mother, Nóra Emödy, and an Egyptian father, Ahmed Abouzahra, both pianists, the young musician is also the granddaughter of the famous Egyptian actor Abdel-Rahman Abouzahra.

Mariam Abouzahra started playing the violin at the age of three, like her older sister Amira.

Both sisters performed a lot and won international competitions, such as the German national youth competition, the Virtuózok Talent show in Hungary and many others.

In 2020, the sisters received the highest awards from one of the most prestigious competitions for young violinists – the Arthur Grumiaux International Competition in Belgium.

The Abouzahra sisters are also among the rare young talents who are offered support by the Fondation Jeunes Virtuoses.

Mariam is currently studying at the University of Music and Performing Arts in Vienna under violin teacher Dora Schwarzberg.

In December 2021, she won the silver prize at the Nutcracker International Television Competition for Young Musicians in Moscow, Russia.

Short link:

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Star Wars miniseries score features strings by violinist Brandon James Ehnes https://allanpettersson.org/star-wars-miniseries-score-features-strings-by-violinist-brandon-james-ehnes/ Fri, 06 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/star-wars-miniseries-score-features-strings-by-violinist-brandon-james-ehnes/ Like a life star wars fan, Brandon-born violinist James Ehnes is thrilled to have his name attached to the new Obi Wan Kenobi miniseries, slated to debut on Disney+ on May 27. Ehnes said the show’s composer, Natalie Holt, admired his work and floated the idea that they should collaborate after the couple finally met […]]]>



Like a life star wars fan, Brandon-born violinist James Ehnes is thrilled to have his name attached to the new Obi Wan Kenobi miniseries, slated to debut on Disney+ on May 27.

Ehnes said the show’s composer, Natalie Holt, admired his work and floated the idea that they should collaborate after the couple finally met late last year.



Ewan McGregor reprises his role as Obi-Wan Kenobi in the Disney+ miniseries of the same name. (Lucasfilm Ltd., ILM)

While the project was initially shrouded in secrecy, Ehnes eventually discovered that Holt had been hired to compose the score for the latest live-action star wars series, and he was more than happy to travel to Los Angeles in March to lend his expertise.

“The timing worked beautifully,” he says over the phone. “I actually had a gig in Orange County (California) that night, but during the day I went to Fox studios where they did the score and spent the day there- down and had a great time.”

The plot of Obi Wan Kenobi takes place a decade after the events of Star Wars: Episode III — Revenge of the Sith, where the titular Jedi Knight (played by Ewan McGregor) is drawn into an adventure as he watches over a young Luke Skywalker on the planet Tatooine.

In addition to presenting the return of star wars former actors such as McGregor and Hayden Christensen, the show also includes new music from composer John Williams, whose work has defined the sci-fi franchise since its inception in 1977.

For Ehnes, working alongside industry heavyweights such as Williams, Holt and orchestrator Pete Anthony made this project a special experience.

“Not just because it was star wars and all that, but because I was working with this great composer and this beautiful music, with these other great musicians in the orchestra.”

While in the studio, Ehnes led the string section and even provided some solo work, Holt later recounting vanity lounge that these “emotional violin themes” will play an important role in the first episode of the series.




<p>Bruce Bumstead/Brandon Sun</p>
<p>Brandon-born Juno Award-winning violinist James Ehnes leads the string section on the score for the Obi-Wan Kenobi miniseries.</p>
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Bruce Bumstead/Brandon Sun

Juno award-winning violinist James Ehnes, who was born in Brandon, leads the string section on the Obi-Wan Kenobi miniseries score.

Although Ehnes isn’t sure how much of his music will make the final cut, the 46-year-old is glad he was able to tap into his “inner nerddom” after watching star wars movies from childhood.

“It’s funny how I grew up with the original trilogy, then the next three (films) came out when I was in college, then the last three came out because I was a father and my kids are in star wars,” he said.

“So it’s been a part of my whole life, and it’s been really, really fun. So even though it’s a small part, it’s kind of cool.”

While Ehnes’ work on Obi Wan Kenobi is not his first collaboration on film and television projects, he is best known for his public performances.

After playing with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra at the age of 13, Ehnes has since served in the string section of various renowned orchestras, from Boston to Vienna to Prague.




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<p>James Ehnes, 46, says the Star Wars series has been part of his life since he was a child.</p>
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Provided

James Ehnes, 46, says the Star Wars series has been a part of his life since he was a child.

Despite a long hiatus from in-person performances due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Ehnes is currently touring Europe and rediscovering her love for craftsmanship one show at a time.

“Wherever you go there’s been a slightly different vibe in terms of recovering from COVID and all that,” he said. “But playing again with full orchestras in full houses, that’s my wheelhouse. So that’s what I really enjoyed, coming back to that.”

Outside of his public performances, Ehnes’ recorded work has earned him a variety of industry accolades, including two Grammys, 11 Junos, and a 2021 Gramophone Award for Artist of the Year.

kdarbyson@brandonsun.com

Twitter: @KyleDarbyson

— Brandon’s Sun


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World-renowned violinist Bernadett will perform a free concert for the biggest US-Hungarian event https://allanpettersson.org/world-renowned-violinist-bernadett-will-perform-a-free-concert-for-the-biggest-us-hungarian-event/ Mon, 02 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/world-renowned-violinist-bernadett-will-perform-a-free-concert-for-the-biggest-us-hungarian-event/ She will perform for the Hungarian summit on Saturday, May 14, 2022 in Daytona Beach. Her rendition of “America The Beautiful” is this year’s official anthem. DAYTONA BEACH, Florida., May 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Hungarians have a rich musical culture with the violin. A name that stands out from the rest is Bernadette Nyari. Bernadett […]]]>

She will perform for the Hungarian summit on Saturday, May 14, 2022 in Daytona Beach. Her rendition of “America The Beautiful” is this year’s official anthem.

DAYTONA BEACH, Florida., May 2, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Hungarians have a rich musical culture with the violin. A name that stands out from the rest is Bernadette Nyari. Bernadett is a world-class concert violinist, offering an incredible array of musical styles. Her recent original single, “Redemption”, even hit the UK iTunes Pop charts. She is born in Budapest, Hungaryto a family of musicians, and she has graced concert stages in more than 90 countries.

On Saturday, May 14, 2022, Bernadett will show off his impressive talents during a free concert at Hungary’s biggest US-based event, the Hungarian Summit. Bernadett’s rendition of “America The Beautiful” has been chosen as the official anthem of Summit 2022. His performance will take place at 3 p.m., at the Daytona Beach Museum of Arts and Sciences. You can register for the event and make a donation at https://whova.com/portal/registration/hunga_202205/.

Anyone making a donation will receive a “fast pass” ticket which will allow the holder to access the event earlier. Part of these donations will go to Ukrainian refugees in Transcarpathia and the Early Learning Coalition Flagler and Volusia.

Watch “America The Beautiful” on https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YB2sghJ2i8U.

ABOUT THE HUNGARIAN SUMMIT: Presented by HungarianHub.com, this monumental event celebrates community, education, business, sport and culture by building a bridge between Europe and the United States https://hungariansummit.com/

ABOUT BERNADETT: Bernadett’s career has taken her around the world, performing in 90 countries since she was 18. Inspired by her grandfather, the famous Hungarian violinist József B. Suha, Bernadett embarked on the same path, bringing joy and happiness. to its listeners, wherever they are in the world. More recently, Bernadett moved to UNITED STATES, a place his grandfather never had the chance to play. His music has been broadcast on 85K times on Spotify. http://bernadettofficial.com/

https://www.youtube.com/QodeInteractiveVideos

https://www.instagram.com/bernadett_official/

https://www.facebook.com/bernadettofficial

CONTACT:
Michael Stover
MTS Management Group
[email protected]
www.mtsmanagementgroup.com
412-445-5282

THE SOURCE Bernadette Nyari

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Violinist Ken Aiso and pianist Valeria Morgovskaya will perform for the Glendale Noon concerts https://allanpettersson.org/violinist-ken-aiso-and-pianist-valeria-morgovskaya-will-perform-for-the-glendale-noon-concerts/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/violinist-ken-aiso-and-pianist-valeria-morgovskaya-will-perform-for-the-glendale-noon-concerts/ Valeria Morgovskaya and Ken Aiso On Wednesday, May 4 at 12:10 p.m., the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts program will be streamed. Violinist Ken Aiso and pianist Valeria Morgovskaya will perform works by Vivaldi, Davitashvili, Barvinsky and Saint-Saens on a Facebook and YouTube stream. Upcoming concerts will be updated on http://glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com. The streaming will be […]]]>
Valeria Morgovskaya and Ken Aiso

On Wednesday, May 4 at 12:10 p.m., the Free Admission Glendale Noon Concerts program will be streamed.

Violinist Ken Aiso and pianist Valeria Morgovskaya will perform works by Vivaldi, Davitashvili, Barvinsky and Saint-Saens on a Facebook and YouTube stream.

Upcoming concerts will be updated on http://glendalenoonconcerts.blogspot.com.

The streaming will be the duet recital of Ken Aiso on violin and Valeria Morgovskaya on piano. On the program, Antonio Vivaldi, “Spring of the four seasons”, Allegro, Largo and Allegro; Meri Davitashvili “Poem”; Vassiliy Barvinsky “Humoresque” and Camille Saint-Saëns “Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso”.

Internationally renowned violinist/violist Ken Aiso has performed worldwide as a soloist, chamber musician and orchestral musician. Aiso graduated from the Royal Academy of Music in London and studied with Erich Gruenberg. His other teachers include Eduard Schmieder and Chikashi Tanaka. Equally at home with modern and ancient instruments, Aiso has performed as concertmaster with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, London Philharmonic, Hallé and Scottish Chamber Orchestras.

He has been invited to renowned music festivals in the UK, France, Sweden, Switzerland, India, Georgia, Bolivia and Kazakhstan, and has taught at the Montecito Summer Music Festival since 2008. Aiso is a winner of the international Long-Thibaud competition in Paris and internationally. Music Competition of Japan, and was elected an Associate of the Royal Academy of Music in London. He received the Shimousa Kan-ichi Music Award in his native Japan in 2018. Since moving to Los Angeles in 2015, Aiso has been a professor at Loyola Marymount and La Sierra universities, and performs with the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra .

Valeria Morgovskaya, pianist, graduated from the kyiv State Conservatory. Since her immigration to the United States in 1990, Morgovskaya has been in great demand as an accompanist for singers and all orchestral instrumentalists. She has been an official accompanist at festivals and courses such as the Piatigorsky Cello Seminar and the Beverly Hills Music Festival, and has performed in the United States, Germany and Japan, as well as on numerous radio shows. She has accompanied numerous national and international competitions and was official accompanist at the Schoenfeld International String Competition in Hong Kong (2013) and Harbin (2014). Morgovskaya is currently an accompanist at Loyola Marymount University and UCLA, and is often engaged in this capacity at USC, Cal State Long Beach, Colburn School, Montecito International Music Festival, Academy of the West and Idyllwild School of Music. and the Arts.

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Estonian violinist Hans Christian Aavik triumphs at the Nielsen Competition | New https://allanpettersson.org/estonian-violinist-hans-christian-aavik-triumphs-at-the-nielsen-competition-new/ Mon, 11 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/estonian-violinist-hans-christian-aavik-triumphs-at-the-nielsen-competition-new/ Estonian violinist Hans Christian Aavik, 23, received the top prize at the ten-day, three-round Carl Nielsen International Competition in Odense, Denmark on Sunday. He shared the top prize with Ukrainian violinist Bohdan Luts, 17. Aavik also received the award for Best Performance of a Piece Commissioned for the Violin Competition for his performance of Jesper […]]]>

Estonian violinist Hans Christian Aavik, 23, received the top prize at the ten-day, three-round Carl Nielsen International Competition in Odense, Denmark on Sunday. He shared the top prize with Ukrainian violinist Bohdan Luts, 17.

Aavik also received the award for Best Performance of a Piece Commissioned for the Violin Competition for his performance of Jesper Koch’s “Maze” and one of three contestants to win the Odense Symphony Orchestra Prize.

In the competition final, Aavik performed PI Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 35 (with musicians from the Copenhagen Philharmonic Orchestra, conducted by Nikolaj Szeps-Znaider) and C. Nielsen’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, Op. 33 (with the Odense Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Daniela Musca).

Recordings of the semi-finals and the final broadcast live can be viewed on the competition homepage here.

Aavik’s semi-final and final performances can be viewed at the links below:

Semi final: Violin Concerto No. 5 in A major by WA Mozart

Last day 1: Violin Concerto in D major by PI Tchaikovsky, Op. 35

Last day 2: Concerto for violin and orchestra by C. Nielsen, op. 33

Hans Christian Aavik began studying violin with Piret Kreek at Tabasalu Music School at the age of 5 and continued his studies under Kaido Välja at Tallinn Music High School.

Since 2017 he has been studying at the Frankfurt University of Music and Performing Arts with Erik Schumann and Angelika Merkle, and since 2021 he has also been studying at the Musik und Kunst Privatuniversität der Stadt Wien with Julian Rachlin and Evgeny Sinaiski.

With permission from the Estonian Musical Instrument Foundation and the Sapožnin family, Aavik currently plays a Giovanni Paolo Maggini violin (made in Brescia, Italy around 1610) with a Victor Fetique bow (made around 1930 in France).

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‘I had two identities’ – Baroque violinist Théotime Langlois de Swarte | Focus https://allanpettersson.org/i-had-two-identities-baroque-violinist-theotime-langlois-de-swarte-focus/ Thu, 07 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/i-had-two-identities-baroque-violinist-theotime-langlois-de-swarte-focus/ The following excerpt is from the February 2022 issue of The Strad “Théotime Langlois de Swarte: Dramatic flair”. To read it in its entirety, click here to subscribe and log in. The month of February 2022 digital magazine and print edition are on sale now It wasn’t all fiddling, however. Until the age of about […]]]>

The following excerpt is from the February 2022 issue of The Strad “Théotime Langlois de Swarte: Dramatic flair”. To read it in its entirety, click here to subscribe and log in. The month of February 2022 digital magazine and print edition are on sale now

It wasn’t all fiddling, however. Until the age of about 14, Langlois de Swarte also sang in the choir led by his mother, and this included a great deal of musical theatre. ‘Since Olivier ! at Peter Maxwell Davies The two violinists – and I always played the roles of the characters. In The two violinists I was one of the trolls, which was really fun, and I think part of the boy I was when I played a troll is still on stage with me now – because we’re seen by the audience and heard. Music is not fake expression – you feel every expression you play. But I think how you appear on stage is really important.

At 17, Langlois de Swarte entered the Paris Conservatory to study the modern violin in the class of Michaël Hentz. “He studied in Saint Petersburg and was mentored by Sergiu Celibidache, which was very interesting. I arrived with my technical background and my baroque sound, whereas his vision of the Russian school was the opposite of the ideas of baroque music – ideas of a small sound for chamber music at Versailles. Violinists always say that you imitate the voice, and with him I really worked on making a much bigger and thicker sound, on building up my vibrato, and that in turn extended my colors as a baroque violinist.

Lessons with Hentz occupied five, sometimes six hours a week, encompassing quartet, duet, trio, and solo playing, and all of it modern. “The concerto I played the most at the Paris Conservatoire was Shostakovich’s Premier! In the background, however, Baroque was also seething, and more and more seriously. What changed his life the most, at 18, he auditioned for Les Arts Florissants, and William Christie took a leap of faith.

“He told me that following my audition, the other members of Les Arts Florissants said: ‘He’s too much of a soloist to play in the group; he won’t come in,” Langlois de Swarte explains. ‘ To which William replied, ‘Yeah, maybe, but we should try’, and I love the way he works. When he has a choir, he wants the soloists to sing in it, but with their individual color that always stands out. Likewise, if someone in the second row of second fiddlers can hear themselves speaking, they are very happy because it adds to the collective expression. He does not want to erase personalities. He does not seek homogeneity, and it is thanks to this attitude that I started with them, because at the beginning I been too solo. I played too hard, I was out of place. But little by little I learned and in the process I discovered a lot of repertoire.

It was through Les Arts Florissants that Langlois de Swarte realized that in the long term, he wanted above all to express himself through baroque music, with in particular an interpretation of Mondonville. Great Motets proving to be a particularly powerful experience. “I just fell in love,” he recalls. “He’s not a famous French composer, but I found his music so brilliant, so powerful. And I realized that was what I really wanted to do with my life – find forgotten composers, and express myself through their music as if it were mine, written yesterday. One of the wonderful things about human beings is that we feel the same emotions as the people painted by Caravaggio, and I was looking at the Caravaggio Boy with a fruit basket, this Italian teenager, and thinking that he and I might share the same feeling: the future a little uncertain, the heightened emotions, the idea of ​​needing to do something extraordinary. These reflections made me want to play in Mondonville, and to play with Les Arts Florissants.

Christie kept inviting him to play. At the same time, at the CNSM in Paris, barely 20 years old, Langlois de Swarte also founded his own period orchestra, Le Consort, with harpsichordist Justin Taylor, violinist Sophie de Bardonnèche and viola da gamba Louise Pierrard. “I had two identities,” he says. “I played repertoire like Beethoven’s quartets all week on the modern violin; then at the weekend I played a trio sonata on my baroque violin in a beautiful little church in another part of France.

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8-year-old Edmonton fiddler Liam Ng wins international honor https://allanpettersson.org/8-year-old-edmonton-fiddler-liam-ng-wins-international-honor/ Thu, 07 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/8-year-old-edmonton-fiddler-liam-ng-wins-international-honor/ An Edmonton boy with quick fingers and a great ear for music is quickly becoming an internationally recognized musical prodigy. While most eight-year-olds are attending Year 3 this week, Liam Ng is in Brussels, Belgium preparing for performances in Vienna, Austria and London, England. “When I was three I really loved music, then at five […]]]>

An Edmonton boy with quick fingers and a great ear for music is quickly becoming an internationally recognized musical prodigy.

While most eight-year-olds are attending Year 3 this week, Liam Ng is in Brussels, Belgium preparing for performances in Vienna, Austria and London, England.

“When I was three I really loved music, then at five and three-quarters I was taking violin lessons,” Ng told CTV News Edmonton.

“We would have toy instruments and amazingly he would be able to play a tune,” Liam’s father Angus explained.

Relying on his natural talent, Liam trains at least two hours a day and attends music lessons twice a week.

“A fantastic boy, very talented, and he has a wonderful supporting family,” said Svitlana Remniakova-Ostrovska, Liam’s music teacher.

Liam Ng and his father Angus during an interview with CTV News Edmonton.

Liam was recently among the winners of the Virtuoso Grand Prize, an international music competition. This honor came with an invitation to perform at the Musikverein in Vienna and the Royal Albert Hall in London.

“There are like red chairs and Elton John’s piano is there,” Liam said, adding that he planned to take a selfie on stage. The London venue can hold more than 5,000 people, but Liam said he wasn’t nervous, thanks to his mum’s guidance.

“I’m here to show everyone, the world, music, not to compete and be stressed and breathe so hard,” he recalled.

It all happens so fast for the youngster, but his parents and teacher said they were careful not to overwhelm Liam with the pressures of competition.

“We’re very proud, but we’re also trying to remember that yes, he’s eight years old and he still has to go play outside and do other activities and finish school as well,” Angus explained.

“He loves music. We won’t break him because of pressure or anything like that. I want him to enjoy life,” Remniakova-Ostrovska said.

Liam already has a clear goal for his future, although he will probably have to finish primary school first.

“My goal is to be a soloist in the orchestra,” he said proudly.

With files from Amanda Anderson of CTV News Edmonton

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