Symphonic composer – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 02:01:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://allanpettersson.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-19-120x120.png Symphonic composer – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ 32 32 Composer hails Queen after writing music for her funeral as a ‘true defender of the faith’ https://allanpettersson.org/composer-hails-queen-after-writing-music-for-her-funeral-as-a-true-defender-of-the-faith/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 11:10:06 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/composer-hails-queen-after-writing-music-for-her-funeral-as-a-true-defender-of-the-faith/ Composer hails Queen after writing music for her funeral as a ‘true defender of the faith’ Calendar An icon of a desktop calendar. to cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across it. Caret A right-pointing solid arrow icon. E-mail An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of Facebook’s “f” […]]]>





Composer hails Queen after writing music for her funeral as a ‘true defender of the faith’



































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Rise Composer Ré Olunuga on Infusing Disney’s Score with Greek and African Influences, and Exploring Themes of Love and Family – Below the Line https://allanpettersson.org/rise-composer-re-olunuga-on-infusing-disneys-score-with-greek-and-african-influences-and-exploring-themes-of-love-and-family-below-the-line/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:53:15 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/rise-composer-re-olunuga-on-infusing-disneys-score-with-greek-and-african-influences-and-exploring-themes-of-love-and-family-below-the-line/ To go up picture via Disney+ There are very few NBA players who are as dominant as Giannis Antetokounmpowho has been dubbed “The Greek Freak” due to his jaw-dropping athletic prowess. Giannis has averaged more than 26.9 points per game in each of the past five seasons and has been named an Eastern Conference All-Star […]]]>

To go up picture via Disney+

There are very few NBA players who are as dominant as Giannis Antetokounmpowho has been dubbed “The Greek Freak” due to his jaw-dropping athletic prowess.

Giannis has averaged more than 26.9 points per game in each of the past five seasons and has been named an Eastern Conference All-Star for the past six straight years. It is also a two-time NBA MVP, NBA Finals MVP (2021) and was named to six All-NBA Teams. Need I say more? His resume speaks for itself, and yet what doesn’t show up in the box score every night is the trip that Antetokounmpo has even pledged to qualify for the league first.

He didn’t do it alone…he had his family with him every step of the way, and it’s that family that turns out to be the heart and soul of To go up, which is now streaming on Disney+. Giannis and his four brothers grew up playing professional basketball in one capacity or another, while Thanasis and Costas joined Giannis to become the first trio of brothers to win an NBA championship – a feat they all owe to the hard work and support of their parents, who never wavered in their dream for their sons.

The original music for the film, taken from Re Olunugawhich ranges from melancholic to uplifting, and perfectly complements the central family theme. under the line spoke to Olunuga a while ago, and the composer revealed how he landed his first studio project, why he imbued the score with Greek and African influences, and why the theme of family was so important in this story .

Re Olunuga

Image by Ré Olunuga via Disney+

Below the line: how many projects have you scored before To go up?

Re Olunuga: Oh I did that [for] 16 years old [but] To go up is the first studio project that I did. Still, [I’ve composed scores for] a long, long time back home in Nigeria and [done some] other projects that are kind of continental, and I’ve done projects in the UK as well.

BTL: With To go up being your first studio project, and under Disney no less, how did the opportunity arise? And is there something in the history of the Antetokounmpo family that attracted you to the project?

Olunuga: There’s a lot of things about the project that when people see this movie, they’re going to connect with [them] because, basically, it is [about] something we can all identify with: family. [Family is] the heart of this film and the love that can exist within a family is unlike anything else.

At the time when the studio and the filmmaker were looking for composers, what I had heard [was that they were] just trying to be as authentic as possible. At the same time, on my side, I was trying to develop myself — I was trying to jump [into] studio movies and bigger projects and we were just kind of looking for the same thing, and the first conversation I had with the filmmaker [Akin Omotoso] lasted for hours. I felt like I understood what they were looking for, [and] they liked what I presented and the approach I would have.

We [had] other conversations and really knew what we were looking for; we knew what we wanted the audience to feel and what we wanted to deliver in terms of cinematic stories. But above that, it’s about families and the sacrifices parents typically make to position their children for better opportunities. [and] a better life, that sort of thing.

To go up

To go up picture via Disney+

BTL: What were you trying to accomplish with your music for this film?

Olunuga: I think when you approach a score, there’s a big question that I, as a composer, try to answer in an interesting way. You ask exactly what a moviegoer would ask – “What does it look like?” – and I have to think of something that seems to answer this question [and] the studio question, but also answers the questions of “How can I write something that is interesting for me?” and “How can I write something new for me?” so that the writing process is not too difficult [and I’m] excited to put something together.

With this movie, the way I responded to that was by taking a big, orchestral, symphonic sound that most people recognize as [the way that] Disney music sounds, but with my own personal accent [and] giving him a reason to include [certain] musical philosophies, this phraseology that I always thought would be interesting.

I thought that [a] score of this scale could be interesting but I had not had the opportunity to explore this [yet] and it was just perfect. It was very nuanced; there are ideas in there that will appeal to music nerds, but the most important thing was that the audience felt what was at the heart of each scene.

To go up

To go up picture via Disney+

BTL: Can I ask you to describe your score in three words or less?

Olunuga: Wow… can we come back to this question?

BTL: Yes, of course. Were there any unique techniques or instruments you used for this score?

Olunuga: There were ideas that I always thought of that I had the opportunity to store in this score, one of them [being] using rhythm as a pattern. I think it’s very useful to create emotional connections with characters and relationships [and attach that] to a sound by creating a melody.

But I’ve always wondered about – in this composer’s toolkit – the idea of ​​using rhythm and just living. It can happen in percussion, it can happen with instruments that are mostly monotonous, and [it can] grow so that it can create greater ascension. That was one of the things I loved exploring in this score which included so many African instruments. [We wanted to] create something cohesive, take classical Western instruments and African percussion instruments, as well as Greek instruments, and infuse that with this style of Afrobeat drumming.

I’m not [one] force together [a] multi-genre piece of music, but for everything to cohesively interact with each other, it was another great opportunity, another great artistic homage happening. I’m so glad [about] how it went, and there’s nothing like working with brilliant musicians, people who are right at the top of their game and are emotionally sensitive enough to know what you’re looking for and know what you aim.

To go up picture via Disney+

BTL: To go up has been streaming on Disney+ for a few months, so what do you hope audiences have taken away from it now?

Olunuga: I think every person [can] connecting memories of what it’s like to start a family, or what it’s like to work hard to achieve your dreams and support your children, [and] how your parents support you. There are so many incredible things happening in the film, and it’s all the more beautiful because it’s [a] true [story].

But one of the things that stood out to me throughout the process was [that] although life can be difficult, it is necessary to keep in mind the things that are most important to you, and you must keep your hands on [those]. This family [the Antetokounmpos] kept that bond together. They say they’re always together throughout, they go through every decision, every challenge, [and] every success together. I think right now, basically, I see a lot of conflict about fiction in our world, and the more we can share stories like this, [we can see] how alike we are and how important and helpful it is to reach out to each other. [The more we] helping each other, the better.

BTL: Before concluding, I must go back to my previous question. Did you think of three words or less to describe your score?

Olunuga: Well… what was the longest pause of a composer on this question? Is there a recording?

BTL: There’s no official record, but there were a few times they asked to go back on it…but they did answer, Re!

Olunuga: Yes, because I think the music itself is what I’m trying to convey, and words aren’t enough. But I would say this [score is] “moving”, “warm” and “festive”.

Rise is now streaming on Disney+.

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Ramsey Lewis, jazz master, composer, also put tunes on Top 40 radio https://allanpettersson.org/ramsey-lewis-jazz-master-composer-also-put-tunes-on-top-40-radio/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 11:44:04 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/ramsey-lewis-jazz-master-composer-also-put-tunes-on-top-40-radio/ The success spawned other pop hits and introduced Lewis to a large national audience. His talent for moving the crowd during this live recording also betrayed a natural ability to reach the listener. “Ramsey was a great artist,” said Gary Motley, jazz pianist and director of jazz studies at Emory University. “He knew how to […]]]>

The success spawned other pop hits and introduced Lewis to a large national audience. His talent for moving the crowd during this live recording also betrayed a natural ability to reach the listener.

“Ramsey was a great artist,” said Gary Motley, jazz pianist and director of jazz studies at Emory University. “He knew how to work a piece. He would connect with people and really play with his audience.

Lewis, 87, died Monday, Sept. 12 at his home in Chicago.

He grew up in Chicago’s infamous Cabrini-Green housing projects. Trained as a classical pianist, he also played in church from childhood. Both sources emerged in his music, which shared the same gospel-inspired hard bop championed by Horace Silver and Bobby Timmons.

A performance by Ramsey Lewis offered romantic ballads and standards, but as the evening wore on he had the audience on their feet. “Slowly but surely by the time we get to the middle of the show, I’m starting to move into songs that are a little more shaken up if you will,” he told NPR.

Atlanta jazz trumpeter and big band leader Joe Gransden grouped Lewis with artists such as Lee Morgan and Herbie Hancock, whose tracks “Sidewinder” and “Watermelon Man” (respectively) also enjoyed chart success and brought soulful swing jazz to a much wider audience.

“They were able to have a creative improvisation to a more danceable groove that was more palatable to millions of people,” Gransden said. “The result not only helped their careers, but helped jazz music reach a wider audience.”

Lewis repeated the pop-jazz combination a few times, with a cover of “Hang on Sloopy”, “Summer Breeze” (from Seals and Crofts), “Dancing in the Street” and several Beatles tracks, including “And I Love Her” and “A Hard Day’s Night”.

“Some jazz players who were more purists might have ridiculed him a bit,” said Geoffrey Haydon, professor and piano coordinator at Georgia State University. “On the other hand, this guy was bringing music to people who otherwise might not know it. He’s not Art Tatum, he’s not Oscar Peterson. He was a dirt player. down to earth that most of the audience could immediately identify with.

Motley, who worked with Lewis bassist Cleveland Eaton, said a Lewis performance was smartly constructed. The pianist knew how to “read the piece, construct a solo. How do you build it to a peak, how do you get people in? Ramsey was the master of this.

In the 1970s, Lewis leaned into R&B. His former drummer, Maurice White, had then founded Earth, Wind & Fire, and co-wrote and produced the album “Sun Goddess” by Ramsey Lewis. This album, with its electric keyboards, put Lewis back on the pop charts.

But Lewis never left jazz behind, said Alterman, who opened for Lewis several times at New York’s Blue Note, and has stayed in touch over the years. “People lock him into this soul-funk stuff,” Alterman said, “but people don’t know what a great pianist he was.”

Lewis’ success with “The ‘In’ Crowd” seemed to happen by accident. His trio was recording a live album at the Bohemian Caverns in Washington, D.C., in 1965, and, sitting in a nearby cafe, they discussed finding one more track to end the evening. A waitress at the store suggested the then-popular Dobie Gray tune and blasted a quarter of it into a jukebox to demonstrate.

The trio worked out a quick “head” arrangement and played it as a set-ender. The live recording picks up the joyful shouts and cheers of the crowd, giving the hit single the loose, buzzy feel of a party that has just taken off.

The tune peaked at number five on the singles chart, placing the Ramsey Lewis Trio in territory that jazz musicians rarely visit. Fans kept asking for it throughout his career.

In 2016, Lewis told NPR “I’ve got people coming backstage, and some of them say, ‘my parents had that record,’ and some of them say, ‘my grandparents had that record. “. It looks like it has stood the test of time.

Lewis worked as an educator to bring attention to jazz traditions. He hosted a weekly radio show and then a public television series, both titled “Legends of Jazz with Ramsey Lewis”, featuring live performances by Dave Brubeck, Tony Bennett, Chick Corea, David Sanborn, Clark Terry, Benny Golson, Eddie Palmieri, Pat Metheny, Phil Woods and many more.

He also began composing for orchestra later in life, and in his 80s performed his own piano concerto with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

The National Endowment for the Arts proclaimed him “Master of Jazz” in 2007, the highest honor given to jazz musicians by the NEA.

ExploreRead and sign Ramsey Lewis’ online guestbook
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Composer Viet Cuong creates new works as part of the SPCO Sandbox Composer Residency program https://allanpettersson.org/composer-viet-cuong-creates-new-works-as-part-of-the-spco-sandbox-composer-residency-program/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 10:01:18 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/composer-viet-cuong-creates-new-works-as-part-of-the-spco-sandbox-composer-residency-program/ The St. Paul Chamber Orchestra got the idea for its new Sandbox Composer Residency program from composer Joseph Haydn. “The idea was born out of a thought experiment I had at the start of the pandemic,” said Kyu-Young Kim, SPCO’s artistic director and lead violinist. “What if the SPCO could have a composer-in-residence like Haydn […]]]>

The St. Paul Chamber Orchestra got the idea for its new Sandbox Composer Residency program from composer Joseph Haydn.

“The idea was born out of a thought experiment I had at the start of the pandemic,” said Kyu-Young Kim, SPCO’s artistic director and lead violinist. “What if the SPCO could have a composer-in-residence like Haydn at Esterhazy? What if a composer today could truly experiment and innovate like Haydn did?”

Haydn, dubbed the “father of the symphony” and the “father of the string quartet”, attributed much of his originality to having an orchestra at his disposal for three decades in the 18th century in a remote Hungarian palace. Today, such relationships rarely develop. Composers usually arrive a few days before the premiere with a final score in hand.

This Sandbox residency is considerably more collaborative, with three different composers each spending five weeks with the SPCO. They will bounce off musicians’ ideas, try out fragments, take part in workshops of orchestral and chamber works, and then create them at subscription concerts.

The first composers invited to play in this sandbox are Viet Cuong, Clarice Assad and Gabriela Lena Frank. Cuong’s residency has already started.

“It’s a dream scenario to have five weeks in a season to develop, work on, rehearse and unveil a play,” Cuong said. “It takes the pressure off of having to deliver something nearly perfect the first time around.”

In addition to premiering a new work at this week’s SPCO concerts, the 32-year-old American composer will continue to refine a work in progress during a rehearsal on Thursday at 10 a.m. open to the public.

This piece – currently titled “Now and Then” – is set to be completed and premiered during the SPCO concerts from November 25-27, with discussions with the public after each performance. Cuong and the orchestra rehearsed the latest version of the score Wednesday at the Ordway Concert Hall, engaging in lively conversation between passages. The composer tossed around ideas for possible revisions, and the musicians responded with their own suggestions.

“The idea is to capture a spirit of innovation, experimentation and co-creation,” Kim said. “Our first workshop with Viet was exactly in that spirit. He wrote five short sketches which we performed, but then also started to deconstruct and piece together with input from the musicians.”

Cuong said “Now and Then” was conceived when he attended SPCO concerts featuring JS Bach’s “Brandenburg Concertos” in December 2021. He began considering using the harpsichord and performing with it. Bach-style chord progressions. The composer returned with these fragments in February and they were fleshed out during the workshops in May.

Assad is next, arriving in the spring and having a few pieces in the works in June. Frank’s residency will take place during the 2023-24 season.

“What the SPCO has developed with the Sandbox residency is unprecedented,” Cuong said. “What’s most special is how the SPCO has put collaboration and community at the heart of these commissions. … We’ve developed mutual trust.”

Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra

Open rehearsal with Sandbox composer in residence Viet Cuong: 10 a.m. Thursday; Ordway Concert Hall, 345 Washington St., St. Paul; $15.

Concerts of works by Haydn, Cuong and Mozart: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church, 12650 Johnny Cake Ridge Road, Apple Valley; 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Friday, Wooddale Church, 6630 Shady Oak Road, Eden Prairie; 8 p.m. Saturday, St. Paul’s United Church of Christ, 900 Summit Av., St. Paul; 2 p.m. Sunday, Benson Great Hall, 3900 Bethel Drive, Arden Hills; $10 to $26 (free for students).

Tickets: Available at 651-291-1144 or thespco.org.

Rob Hubbard is a classical music writer from Twin Cities. Contact him at wordhub@yahoo.com.

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🌱 Brooklyn composer turns 90 + Woman walks through restaurant window https://allanpettersson.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-brooklyn-composer-turns-90-woman-walks-through-restaurant-window/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 20:57:37 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-brooklyn-composer-turns-90-woman-walks-through-restaurant-window/ Hello everyone ! It’s me, Carlie Houser, your Daily host. Let’s dive into Sunday. Born in Brooklynworld-renowned composer Stanley Walden is about to celebrate his 90th birthday and the man still writes scores. As a teenager, Walden was inspired by Walt Disney’s film “Fantasia,” after a childhood relatively dry of any kind of musical exposure. […]]]>

Hello everyone ! It’s me, Carlie Houser, your Daily host. Let’s dive into Sunday.

Born in Brooklynworld-renowned composer Stanley Walden is about to celebrate his 90th birthday and the man still writes scores. As a teenager, Walden was inspired by Walt Disney’s film “Fantasia,” after a childhood relatively dry of any kind of musical exposure. Since the 1950s he has continued to support legendary artists in music, theater and dance, completed his military service with solo clarinet performances with the 7th Army Symphony Orchestra in Europe, had a stint with the New York Philharmonic, was a faculty member at the Juilliard School, founded the Music/Performance Department at Berlin University of the Arts, and received a Grammy nomination for the score for the Broadway musical “Oh! Calcutta!” Another inspiring story from one of Brooklyn’s many creatives. (Desert Sun)

What else is going on?

  • NYC Announces Humanity Coalition for Haiti
  • Mayor wonders about cruise ships
  • A motorist entered a restaurant
  • Ultra-Orthodox schools under the microscope

First, today’s weather forecast:

☀ Rather sunny and wetter. High: 85 Low: 70.


Here are the top stories in Brooklyn today:

1. People gathered in the Little Haiti neighborhood of Brooklyn to deal with the economic and humanitarian crisis in Haiti. The new Humanity Coalition for Haiti follows a meeting between government officials in New York and officials in the Dominican Republic to discuss a range of issues related to commercial aid. As a representative of one of the largest concentrations of Haitians outside of Haiti in Flatbush, Brooklyn, State Senator Kevin Parker addressed the issues of the growing number of Haitian refugees and the need for a deeper communication between governments to address the rapidly developing humanitarian crisis. now in Haiti.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle

2. The city has seen more than 11,000 asylum seekers arrive in the past two months—these figures are unprecedented. Buses used to arrive a few days a week, but now at least 8 drop off people and families each day at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. The city is desperately struggling to house these migrants, and Mayor Eric Adams is exploring the legality of setting up temporary accommodations on cruise ships.

CBS News

3. An elderly woman drove her car straight through a restaurant window in Brighton Beach, causing serious injury to a midday customer having lunch. Seemingly indifferent – leaning against the wrecked car and smoking a cigarette – the driver mentioned that the brakes on her Honda CRV had failed and she had lost control of the vehicle. The elderly man who was punched and injured in the incident is currently in critical condition in Lutheran Hospital. Our thoughts are with him and his family.

MetroLaw

4. After every student failed a series of standardized tests in 2019 at the Central United Talmudical Academy, ultra-Orthodox schools in New York come under scrutiny. This week, New York’s Board of Regents approved, for the first time, rules aimed at addressing longstanding allegations that dozens of ultra-Orthodox private schools, called yeshivas, are defying state law. by failing to provide instruction in English, mathematics and other basic subjects, deliberately depriving some 50,000 students of a basic secular education. The regulations seek to restore mandates that require private schools to provide an education “substantially equivalent” to that received in public schools.

The post of Jerusalem


Today in Brooklyn:

  • 📸 Free Mini Family Photoshoots, Dumbo Waterfront, today at 9 a.m. | Details
  • Brunch Bushwick, Street Art and Open Studios, OTIS, today at 12 p.m. | Details
  • One-day screenings and $8 tickets, Coney Island Film Festival, today at 1 p.m. | Details
  • Cirkus Luna of Dzieci Theatre, Brooklyn’s Old Stone House, today at 3 p.m. | Details

🐝Brooklyn Buzz


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You’re all caught up for today! See you soon.

Carlie Houser

About me: I am a recent graduate based in Brooklyn, NY. I like to write, run, read and find new restaurants and places in town.

Got a news tip or suggestion for an upcoming Brooklyn Daily? Contact me at brooklyn@patch.com

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Israel will celebrate the centenary of composer Fikrat Amirov https://allanpettersson.org/israel-will-celebrate-the-centenary-of-composer-fikrat-amirov/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 08:25:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/israel-will-celebrate-the-centenary-of-composer-fikrat-amirov/ By Laman Ismayilova The Israeli city of Haifa will host a concert scheduled for the 100th birthday of prominent Azerbaijani composer, founder of the symphonic mugham genre Fikrat Amirov, reports Azernews. The concert program will include the Concerto on Arabic Themes for Piano and Symphony Orchestra by Fikrat Amirov, written with the famous composer Elmira […]]]>

By Laman Ismayilova

The Israeli city of Haifa will host a concert scheduled for the 100th birthday of prominent Azerbaijani composer, founder of the symphonic mugham genre Fikrat Amirov, reports Azernews.

The concert program will include the Concerto on Arabic Themes for Piano and Symphony Orchestra by Fikrat Amirov, written with the famous composer Elmira Nazirova.

The Haifa Symphony Orchestra will perform at the concert on December 25. The orchestra will be conducted by People’s Artist of Azerbaijan Yalchin Adigozalov.

Fikrat Amirov managed to synthesize folk music and mugham traditions with modern musical techniques.

The composer wrote the first Azerbaijani lyrical and psychological opera on a contemporary theme. In Sevil opera, the composer used a variety of musical forms.

Amirov’s Shur and Kurd Ovshari symphonic mughams are unprecedented in the history of world music.

He is the author of numerous operas, ballets, symphonies, symphonic poems, symphonic mugham, suites, capriccio, piano concertos, sonatas, musicals and songs, love songs, piano pieces, music for dramatic productions and films.

Fikrat Amirov’s legacy, which calls for patriotism, always instills spiritual wealth and glorifies human ideals, is one of the brightest pages in the history of Azerbaijani music.

UNESCO will celebrate the centenary of Fikrat Amirov. The decision was announced at UNESCO’s 41st General Conference in Paris.

Following the joint activities of the Ministries of Culture and Foreign Affairs, the Permanent Mission of Azerbaijan to UNESCO and the National Commission for UNESCO, the relevant nomination documents have been submitted to UNESCO.

The events have been included in the anniversary program for 2022-2023.

Follow us on twitter @AzerNewsAz

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Automated investment platform Composer raises $6 million https://allanpettersson.org/automated-investment-platform-composer-raises-6-million/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 13:35:38 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/automated-investment-platform-composer-raises-6-million/ Composer, an automated investing platform for retail traders, raised $6 million in new funding led by Left Lane Capital. Why is this important: Despite a pullback in the broader stock market, VCs still have an appetite for trading platforms that give retail traders better tools to make investments. How it works: Composer offers retail investors […]]]>

Composer, an automated investing platform for retail traders, raised $6 million in new funding led by Left Lane Capital.

Why is this important: Despite a pullback in the broader stock market, VCs still have an appetite for trading platforms that give retail traders better tools to make investments.

How it works: Composer offers retail investors an easy-to-use, no-code tool that can be used to create, test, and automatically execute sophisticated algorithmic trading strategies that were previously not easily accessible by the typical retail investor.

  • Investors on the platform can create so-called “symphonies” – systematic investment strategies that react to market conditions and rebalance portfolios based on user-defined parameters.
  • Once created, users can then test these strategies to see how they would have performed historically against the market, refine them, and share them with other investors on and off the platform.

The context: Founder and CEO Benjamin Rollert started creating Composer after trying to code his own systematic trading scripts.

  • “It was about implementing some basic systematic trading strategies that I knew institutions and hedge funds were using,” Rollert said. says Axios. “It was through this process that I discovered that it was actually extremely difficult to implement these types of strategies as a retail investor.”
  • And it hopes to position Composer as an alternative to retail-focused stock trading apps and automated investing platforms. “There is a very polarized set of offerings that are either very gamified trading apps or very smothering and paternalistic roboadvisors,” says Rollert.

Yes, but: For users who aren’t as adventurous or confident in creating their own trading strategies, Composer has an in-house investment team that provides templates that its users can invest in directly or easily modify to their liking.

Yes and: While other trading platforms are seeing a reduction in net inflows, Composer says it continues to grow despite a pullback in the broader stock market.

  • “There are more AUMs on the platform than net deposits,” says Left Lane Managing Partner Harley Miller. “Which shows that, overall, Composer customers are probably doing better than the market as a whole right now.”

To note : With this latest funding, Composer has raised a total of $11 million, which includes backing from investors including First Round Capital, AVG Basecamp, Draft Ventures, and Not Boring Capital.

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Pianist and composer Olli Mustonen on his return to Australia https://allanpettersson.org/pianist-and-composer-olli-mustonen-on-his-return-to-australia/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 19:30:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/pianist-and-composer-olli-mustonen-on-his-return-to-australia/ The most exhausting of the four roles is teaching, Mustonen says. “I always feel like I learn a lot myself by teaching, by verbalizing what you do. You work on different levels – the big level, the poetic, down to the little technical details, looking at the music through a microscope. It’s a relief to […]]]>

The most exhausting of the four roles is teaching, Mustonen says. “I always feel like I learn a lot myself by teaching, by verbalizing what you do. You work on different levels – the big level, the poetic, down to the little technical details, looking at the music through a microscope. It’s a relief to be back on stage.

But the roles are each very different. Recitals can be solitary, traveling from town to town, while conducting and chamber music are much more social. “You interact with people, I love it and I’m very inspired. It can be risky because sometimes the interaction is not easy, and playing a solo recital is wonderful because you don’t depend on the interaction with others.

Mustonen tends to compose at his home in Finland during the summer, especially if he has a big order. He loves the wilderness – there are bears and wolves in the forest next to his property next to an Australian-shaped lake – and he can work relatively quietly.

Composing is partly a very conscious and active process, but sometimes he feels that the composition is being born, and he discovers it.

It may sound mystical, he says, but every composer knows that sometimes the work has its own will. “Sometimes you can write something, and it’s a great effort and you think it’s very smartly done, but it doesn’t really work. It can be difficult because you’ve done a lot of work, but then you have to throw 10 pages in the trash and rewrite.

Mustonen almost always writes the ending of a track fairly early, even if he doesn’t yet know what will happen in between. And, because songwriters always get stuck sometimes, he writes multiple spots at the same time and just picks up where it sinks in. “You’re unlikely to get stuck in four places at once, but you have to trust your intuition as to how it will pan out.”

He has a great affection for Australia and has been visiting Australia for about thirty years. He met ACO director Richard Tognetti through mutual friend, cellist Steven Isserlis, and the duo immediately became good friends. “We immediately entered into such an inspired collaboration, and then I also collaborated with other orchestras, fantastic orchestras like the Sydney Symphony and the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra.”

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His music is performed frequently in Australia, notably by the ACO. “I hear a lot about my kids, my compositions, they’re busy there. I’m very grateful that Australia is warm and friendly with my music, and I love Australia very much.

Olli Mustonen is touring with the ACO September 15-28 with performances in Melbourne September 17-19.

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Egyptian composer Nahla Mattar publishes A Day’s Repeated Moments on Youtube – Music – Arts & Culture https://allanpettersson.org/egyptian-composer-nahla-mattar-publishes-a-days-repeated-moments-on-youtube-music-arts-culture/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 12:37:15 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/egyptian-composer-nahla-mattar-publishes-a-days-repeated-moments-on-youtube-music-arts-culture/ The video shows Moro performing the composition during the 6th edition of the Piano Lab festival, held in August at the Church of Saint Francesco, in the Martina Franca in Taranto, Italy – in a beautiful Gothic atmosphere. Moro, who started playing the piano at the age of 9, studied at the Conservatories F. Cilea, […]]]>

The video shows Moro performing the composition during the 6th edition of the Piano Lab festival, held in August at the Church of Saint Francesco, in the Martina Franca in Taranto, Italy – in a beautiful Gothic atmosphere.

Moro, who started playing the piano at the age of 9, studied at the Conservatories F. Cilea, in Reggio Calabria, and G. Verdi, in Milan, then obtained his cum laude (piano) at the Conservatorio N. Piccinni from Bari.

Mattar is a professor at the Faculty of Music Pedagogy, Theory and Composition Section of Helwan University.

A Day’s Repeated Moments traces the composer’s own life stories.

Contrary to the logic of “pure music that appeals only to an abstract and absolute perception like a symphony or a concerto, the piece has no extra-musical element”, Mattar explained to Al-Ahram Hebdo, the French-language sister publication of Ahram Online.

Program music and composition can be classified as a symphonic poem (orchestral composition usually in one movement, free-form, inspired by a poetic or descriptive extra-musical idea).

It offers the pianist multiple ways of interpretation and experimentation, allowing the musician to express himself freely.

Free as the wind, the pianist Moro manages to touch the listeners, offering them short moments of relaxation, followed by strong accents of anger, irritation and emotional repression.

The composition infuses oriental components such as a repeating rhythmic pattern inspired by maqam hijaz (a melody used in traditional Arabic music).

Moro is not afraid to take risks, submitting his musical interpretation to an abbreviation that allows him to move between space and time.

These emotions go hand in hand with the frantic pace of everyday life and its transformations.

The four-minute piece was mastered by Nahla Mattar in 1998.

“At the time, I was experiencing frustrations on a daily basis. I had terrible mood swings, mostly dominated by moments of anger, sadness, and grief. Hence the birth of this composition. Usually, I draw inspiration from my experience, from my daily stories; I translate them into notes and musical language. In A Day’s Repeated Moments, I tried to communicate my feelings at the time, but also to break away from the monotony. Program music dominated the classical music scene in the 19th century, such as the famous Symphonie Fantastique, premiered by Berlioz in 1830,” says Mattar.

“For me, music is a personality that I form. It all depends on my mood at the time of composition. There can be several moods in the same composition, that’s what I like to call a musical architecture.”

Mattar makes us discover different musical genres in an admirable way, mixing classical with folklore and contemporary, and oriental music with western accents.

The whole piece was born out of two contrasting melodies, booms and falls, playing in chords and another in arpeggios. So, can we speak of an “eye that listens”, according to the beautiful formula of the French artist Paul Claudel?

A Day’s Repeated Moments both narrative and concise, favoring hearing over sight, teaches us to listen to all that comes from the vibrations of the world, not with the ears, but with the spirit, with the “energetic breath” .

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Qatari composer Dana Alfardan concludes ‘Indigo’ album with the release of ‘Onyx’ https://allanpettersson.org/qatari-composer-dana-alfardan-concludes-indigo-album-with-the-release-of-onyx/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/qatari-composer-dana-alfardan-concludes-indigo-album-with-the-release-of-onyx/ Qatari composer and singer-songwriter Dana Alfardan has announced the release of “Onyx”, the latest single from her long-awaited album, “Indigo”. “Ethereal as subtle as it is, ‘Onyx’ transcends physical barriers to speak directly to the soul with a powerful rhythm that contains within its recesses melodies and soft lyrics that inspire the unleashing of intuitive […]]]>

Qatari composer and singer-songwriter Dana Alfardan has announced the release of “Onyx”, the latest single from her long-awaited album, “Indigo”. “Ethereal as subtle as it is, ‘Onyx’ transcends physical barriers to speak directly to the soul with a powerful rhythm that contains within its recesses melodies and soft lyrics that inspire the unleashing of intuitive will”, noted a press release. “Drawing inspiration from the black onyx stone for its strength and resolve, the song is the perfect closure to the musical saga that is ‘Indigo’.”

“Onyx” is an ode to the pursuit of happiness from within, encouraging listeners to accept that contentment is a personal responsibility regardless of outside factors.
As the melodies play, the haunting tunes take control of the brain and transmit it to the heart, embarking the soul on a spiritual journey where, in the end, listeners will let go of what is holding them back and grow.
Dana used musical instruments and vocal techniques that would ignite the third eye chakra, or Ajna, which is related to perception, consciousness, and spiritual communication. The vibrations of his voice build the spiritual bridge one needs to achieve fulfillment. She sings “the wound is where the light enters”, reminding us “we are the ones responsible for finding the light inside to heal and become happy”.
Inspired by German poet, artist and politician Johann Wolfgang von Goethe’s “Color Theory”, “Indigo” is an album that explores sound, color and the multi-sensory experiences that lie beyond.
Commenting on the album as a whole, Dana said, “Each track was composed in a color scheme to capture a mood and state of being.” All tracks will have corresponding conceptual and abstract videos, allowing each listener to create their own personal meaning.”
Following the release of Onyx, the latest single from her forthcoming album ‘Indigo’, Dana performed an exclusive show at London’s distinctive The Ned, an architectural masterpiece in the heart of the city known for its private spaces reserved for members. Becoming the first Qatari musician to perform at The Ned, Dana performed six songs from “Indigo” alongside a chamber orchestra, album producer Nico Dalla Vecchia and musical director Youki Yamamoto.
Proud to be Qatar’s first female composer, the world-renowned symphonic artist is a proud Qatari who remains true to her roots. The music she creates brings together contemporary, Western and neo-classical influences that blend with the musical heritage of the Middle East. “I tend to steer clear of the word ‘fusion’ as it sometimes implies a ‘dilution’ of one style or another. So the idea is to preserve the authenticity of one style of sound and integrate it into another in a way that integrates without one having to adapt to the other by deconstructing Dana said.
When it comes to accomplishments, Dana isn’t one to hold back; she is a cultural ambassador for the Qatar Philharmonic Orchestra, and since 2018 Qatar Airways has adopted her songs as their signature onboarding music.
Outside his country of origin, his impact is considerable; the famous artist created the music for the award-winning film “Orca”, wrote the music for the United Nations Day concert, performed with the London Metropolitan Orchestra at the Theater Royal Haymarket and composed the music for the humanitarian campaign ” Bring Hope for Gaza”.
Together with Lebanese-British West End actor, singer and writer Nadim Naama, Dana is now exploring what theater has to offer. The duo write and produce musicals that aim to “bring universal, liberal and transcendental figures and thoughts from the Middle East to a global Western audience and
West End scene. In 2018, “Broken Wings”, a musical following the life of Lebanese-American writer Khalil Gibran, premiered with sold-out shows at the Haymarket Theater in London, Beiteddine Festival in Lebanon, Katara Opera House in Qatar and the Dubai Opera; this was followed by a six-week run at London’s Charing Cross Theater in 2022.
His second show, the much-loved “Rumi The Musical”, debuted in 2021 – depicting the life of historical poet Jalal Al-Din Rumi. The ‘London Theater Reviews’ described Dana’s score as “Intense, dramatic and beautiful…Elegant, powerful and evocative music: it’s not hard to watch it become a West End hit.”
“Onyx” will be released on Dana Alfardan’s YouTube channel, website, and all other major streaming platforms on August 9.

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