Symphonic composer – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ Sun, 22 May 2022 08:54:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://allanpettersson.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-19-120x120.png Symphonic composer – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ 32 32 First Concert of KMFA’s Draylen Mason Composer-in-Residence Program Launches New Music for Classical Radio — Sightlines https://allanpettersson.org/first-concert-of-kmfas-draylen-mason-composer-in-residence-program-launches-new-music-for-classical-radio-sightlines/ Sat, 21 May 2022 16:39:20 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/first-concert-of-kmfas-draylen-mason-composer-in-residence-program-launches-new-music-for-classical-radio-sightlines/ Anthony McSpadden wants to expand the music we hear every day on classical radio. “There is a reason why [classical music] has survived this long: it’s because it’s great music,” said McSpadden, director of broadcasting and content at KMFA, the classic Austin station. “But we have to continue with new music and add to the […]]]>

Anthony McSpadden wants to expand the music we hear every day on classical radio.

“There is a reason why [classical music] has survived this long: it’s because it’s great music,” said McSpadden, director of broadcasting and content at KMFA, the classic Austin station. “But we have to continue with new music and add to the repertoire,” he said.

So he set about establishing a composer-in-residence program, hoping in particular to amplify voices that have been historically underrepresented. This residency also goes hand in hand with KMFA’s performance space, the Draylen Mason Music Studio, named after an up-and-coming young bassist killed in the 2018 Austin bombing.

This idea seedling will eventually become the Draylen Mason Composer-in-Residence program.

The inaugural composer is Quinn Mason (no relation to Draylen), a Dallas-based rising talent whose work has been performed everywhere from her hometown of Texas to Detroit to San Francisco. Throughout his residency, he will compose three pieces, including one solo and two major works. Each will be recorded and shared with classic radio stations across the country for inclusion in their playlists.

The first, Sonata 22 for solo piano, will be performed by Lara Downes at KMFA’s Draylen Mason Music Studio on May 27.

There is a rich history of radio stations commissioning composers for broadcast. In the 20th century, many composers wrote pieces for radio, including renowned artists like Aaron Copland. And from the 1920s, some composers even wrote short operas specifically for radio broadcast.

For McSpadden, starting a composer-in-residence program was a chance to bring back the idea of ​​a radio composer and allow listeners to find new music on KMFA and other classic stations across the country. He chose Mason as his first Fellow after discovering his music while reading an extensive profile about him in Texas Monthly last year. McSpadden dug into Mason’s music, watching video after video of his work, impressed by his lively and accessible melodies.

“He’s a terribly interesting and extremely talented person,” McSpadden said.

The residency began in February when Mason spent a week in Austin. He participated in many public and private activities and learned more about the Austin music community. He visited Draylen Mason High School in East Austin as well as KMFA’s neighbor Martin Middle School to give talks and masterclasses. He also spent time with Draylen’s family, having dinner with them and learning more about their son.

“It was bittersweet, but it was so nice to get to know them personally,” Quinn said.

Quinn’s Sonata 22 is named for Draylen and its premiere on May 27 would have been his 22nd birthday. It follows Quinn’s recent work, Sonata ’21, which meditated on the events of the year 2021. Sonata 22 is a one-movement work that weaves ruminative melodies to form a sense of deep introspection and reflection. .

“It will be both solemn and festive [occasion]“, Mason said. “I really wanted to create something that had a bit of both. Even though the piece is pensive, it has a cheerful heart.

The May gig was a fortuitous duo: pianist Downes, whom McSpadden immediately thought was a good candidate to play Mason’s music, had already recorded some of his work and loves it. Downs advocates for the popularization of classical music by women and black Americans. She will create Sonata 22, which will be recorded and sent to radio stations across the country who can air the piece and keep it rotating.

The two additional works commissioned, one for symphonic winds and one for choir, will be premiered and recorded in the fall also for radio broadcast.

Looking forward, McSpadden hopes the residency will continue each year, bringing many new composers to write pieces for radio as well as interface with the Austin community.

“I think it’s important,” McSpadden said. “[This] that is what public radio is for.

The KMFA Draylen Mason Composer-In-Residence Concert with Lara Downes will be at 7 p.m. on May 27. Tickets at kmfa.org/kmfa-composer-in-residence-lara-downes-concert

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The composer of “Chariots of Fire” has died | Celebrities https://allanpettersson.org/the-composer-of-chariots-of-fire-has-died-celebrities/ Fri, 20 May 2022 05:06:30 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/the-composer-of-chariots-of-fire-has-died-celebrities/ ATHENS, Greece — Vangelis, the Greek electronic composer who wrote the unforgettable Oscar-winning music for the movie “Chariots of Fire” and the music for dozens of other films, documentaries and TV series, has died at 79. Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis and other government officials expressed their condolences on Thursday. Greek media reported that Vangelis […]]]>

ATHENS, Greece — Vangelis, the Greek electronic composer who wrote the unforgettable Oscar-winning music for the movie “Chariots of Fire” and the music for dozens of other films, documentaries and TV series, has died at 79.

Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis and other government officials expressed their condolences on Thursday. Greek media reported that Vangelis – born Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou – died in a French hospital on Tuesday evening.

“Vangelis Papathanassiou is no longer with us,” Mitsotakis tweeted, calling him an “electronic sound pioneer” whose death is “sad news for the whole world”.

The opening credits of “Chariots of Fire” roll by as a group of young runners slow down a dark Scottish beach as a lazy, rhythmic tune rises to a masterful declamation. It’s one of the most instantly recognizable musical themes in cinema – and its position in popular culture has only been confirmed by the multitude of parodies it has spawned.

The 1981 British film made Vangelis, but his first encounter with success came with his first Greek pop group in the 1960s.

It evolved into a near-classical one-man orchestra, using a vast array of electronic equipment to conjure up its hugely popular undulating sound waves. A private, humorous man – burly, with shoulder-length hair and a trimmed beard – he cited ancient Greek philosophy and saw the artist as a conduit for a basic universal force.

He was fascinated with space exploration and wrote music for celestial bodies, but said he never sought fame himself. Yet a micro-planet revolving somewhere between Mars and Jupiter – 6354 Vangelis – will forever bear his name.

Vangelis began playing the piano at the age of 4, although he received no formal training and claimed he was never taught to read notes.

“Orchestration, composition – they teach those things in music schools, but there are things you can never teach,” he said in a 1982 interview. creation.”

At 20, Vangelis and three friends formed the band Forminx in Athens, which did very well in Greece. After its disbandment, it wrote scores for several Greek films and later became a founding member – along with another internationally renowned Greek musician, Demis Roussos – of the progressive rock band Aphrodite’s Child.

Based in Paris, the progressive rock band produced several European hits, and their last record ‘666’, released in 1972, is still highly acclaimed.

Aphrodite’s Child also broke up, and Vangelis pursued solo projects.

In 1974 he moved to London, built his own studio and cooperated with Yes frontman Jon Anderson, with whom he recorded as Jon and Vangelis and achieved several major hits.

But his huge breakthrough came with the score of “Chariots of Fire” which tells the true story of two British racers competing in the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris. Vangelis’ score won one of four Oscars captured by the film, including Best Picture. The signature track is one of the world’s hardest-to-forget movie melodies – and has also served as the musical background for countless slow-motion parodies.

Vangelis went on to write scores for Ridley Scott’s “Blade Runner” (1982) and “1492: Conquest of Paradise” (1992), as well as “Missing” (1982) and “Antarctica” (1983), among others.

He turned down many other offers of film scores, saying in an interview, “Half the movies I see don’t need music. It looks like something stuffed.

Vangelis was suspicious of the way record companies handled commercial success. With success, he says, “you get stuck and forced to repeat yourself and repeat your previous success.”

His interest in science – including the physics of music and sound – and space exploration led him to compositions related to major NASA and European Space Agency projects. When British theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking died in 2018, Vangelis composed a musical tribute for his burial which the ESA broadcast in space.

Vangelis pumped out his symphonic swells while playing a bank of synthesizers on his own, while flipping switches as his feet moved from volume pedal to volume pedal.

“I work like an athlete,” he once said.

He avoided the lifestyle excesses associated with many in the music industry, saying he had never done drugs – “which was very uncomfortable at times”.

Vangelis said he never experimented with his music and usually does everything from the first take.

“When I compose, I perform the music at the same time, so everything is live, nothing is pre-programmed,” he said.

Decca, the label for his last three albums, called the composer a “genius”.

“Vangelis created music of extraordinary originality and power, and provided the soundtrack to so many of our lives,” he said. “Decca has had the pleasure of partnering with Vangelis and his team for his last three albums and he will be greatly missed. His music will live on forever.

The composer lived in London, Paris and Athens, where he bought a house at the foot of the Acropolis which he never embellished, even when his street became one of the city’s most popular pedestrian promenades. . The neoclassical building was nearly demolished in 2007 when government officials decided it spoiled views of the ancient citadel from a new museum built next door, but was eventually reconsidered.

Vangelis has received numerous awards in Greece, France and the United States. Little was known about his personal life other than that he was an avid painter.

“Every day I paint and every day I compose music,” he said – in that order.

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Kevin Feige wanted a battle between https://allanpettersson.org/kevin-feige-wanted-a-battle-between/ Wed, 18 May 2022 15:26:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/kevin-feige-wanted-a-battle-between/ One of the most exciting scenes from the recent Marvel movie, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, for me, it’s the duel between the two parallel universe Doctor Stranges. The compelling background music feels appropriate for Chinese wuxia drama, but captures the existential vibe of this duel. The composer, Danny Elfman, in this conversation, […]]]>

One of the most exciting scenes from the recent Marvel movie, Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, for me, it’s the duel between the two parallel universe Doctor Stranges. The compelling background music feels appropriate for Chinese wuxia drama, but captures the existential vibe of this duel. The composer, Danny Elfman, in this conversation, sheds light on the conception of this scene among others, why he loved composing for Wanda’s Scarlet Witch, and his relationship with longtime collaborator, director Sam Raimi.

Could you detail the composition of the memorable duel scene?

It was at the very last second because the first version – I was composing it – also combined different types of themes from different composers, from light to heavy. Then at the very last moment, I had a call with Sam Raimi and Kevin Feige (president of the MCU), and the latter said he wanted it to be a battle between Bach and Beethoven. I wrote it very quickly and put it into the movie in time for its release. It was like Doctor Strange Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony and Doctor Strange Bach’s devilish toccata and fugue. It was so much fun.

What was your experience working on the end credits themes, and alluding to the horror genre through Wanda?

The main titles – whether at the beginning or at the end – are the most fun I have in a film. This is where I really like to explore and let go. There’s no dialogue, no sound effects, and it’s just a total playground for me. I live for these moments.

Wanda’s theme was really very special to me because it’s the first time I have a villain that I also really adore. She breaks my heart. You know this is a unique situation. Normally a villain is like Darth Vader and his weight, and their theme is about threat, threat, threat. But here, the antagonist Wanda is also heartbreaking. It was a unique chance to create a theme that could be both heartbreaking and gentle, or powerful and menacing. I loved his character. I mean, every time there’s been a superhero villain whose goal isn’t to destroy the world, but to get its children back? It’s so unique; I have never seen anything like it.

What’s it like to include memorable themes from other composers in your score?

It’s funny! It’s ironic that at the same time I found a moment for the original Michael Giacchino strange doctor theme in the new one, and he had moments on Spider-Man where he used my original Spider-Man theme in his movie. We were doing this almost simultaneously. So it was kind of a weird world. But I like to do that, engage in variations. There’s also a little nod to WandaVision since Marvel loves these little Easter eggs. There’s a third musical tribute, which I won’t say, because we’re still hoping fans find that moment.

How do you distinguish the music from a superhero movie?

It’s different because it gets crazy sometimes. I marked Batman back when there were no rules because there was no idea what it should be. The only superhero role model we had then was Superman. We decided we didn’t want it to sound like the mold of John Williams, even though we like it and it looks good. So it was all experimentation and invention. The moment I did Spiderman, Hulkand Justice League, there was more context for superhero movies. Now as we return to the loop strange doctorwe thought we would go a little crazy again because this movie encourages a little more thinking outside the box.

What’s it like collaborating with Sam Raimi again, and this time on his first MCU project?

Working with Sam is like a special pleasure. He’s a nice guy, and he’s funny. Our encounters together tend to be funny. He turns working together into a fun time and it always has been that way. I feel comfortable with him. We go back so far, and in fact, I met my wife on the set of one of her films that I composed, The Simple Plan. So we are connected in many ways.

My wife and I consider our son to be the child of the Evil Dead franchise in a way (laughs). We are both fans of his and we finally met on the sets of one of his films. Now we have our 17-year-old Oliver from that happy coincidence.

A marvelous phenomenon

Meanwhile, Sam Raimi, the director of Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness, is not at all surprised that the Marvel Cinematic Universe has evolved as it has since its original SpiderMan trilogy. “Stan Lee had created a great pantheon of characters and stories that were all interconnected and beautiful to see. The comics were really cool and exciting. That’s why I tried to sell Thor at that time, but studios didn’t get it. I tried again with The Batman and The Shadow. Hollywood’s history with superheroes was checkered at best,” he says. “I always saw the potential, although I failed to achieve it successfully at the start of my career.”

The filmmaker believes he learned from his mistakes, speaking primarily of Spider-Man 3 (2007), which received negative reviews and brought the franchise to a premature end. “My learning is that audiences connect with the humanity and vulnerability of superheroes. Those attributes need to be present in every moment of the film.

(With contributions by Sudhir Srinivasan)

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RV Symphonic Band Concert to Feature Student Performers, Composers and Conductors – Medford News, Weather, Sports, Breaking News https://allanpettersson.org/rv-symphonic-band-concert-to-feature-student-performers-composers-and-conductors-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Fri, 13 May 2022 18:55:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/rv-symphonic-band-concert-to-feature-student-performers-composers-and-conductors-medford-news-weather-sports-breaking-news/ Christine Lundahl leads a rehearsal of the Rogue Valley Symphonic Band in preparation for their spring concert on May 21. RGBS photo The theme for the Rogue Valley Symphonic Band’s spring concert is about the season and full of optimism. “Through the Sun and Rain, You Will Bloom All the Same” will feature music from […]]]>

Christine Lundahl leads a rehearsal of the Rogue Valley Symphonic Band in preparation for their spring concert on May 21. RGBS photo

The theme for the Rogue Valley Symphonic Band’s spring concert is about the season and full of optimism.

“Through the Sun and Rain, You Will Bloom All the Same” will feature music from Leonard Bernstein, Percy Grainger, Richard Strauss and Lili Boulanger, among others, and will be performed at

3 p.m. Saturday, May 21, at SOU Music Recital Hall, 450 S. Mountain Ave., Ashland.

The concert will feature the first place winner of the 2022 Young Artists Competition and honor the two finalists. Also on the program, a student conductor and a student composer. Although they were not winners of the competition, they were selected to participate as part of the celebration of young artists.

The Young Artist Competition was launched in 2019 by RVSB to reward and recognize the talent and hard work of young artists. After a pandemic hiatus, the program was renewed this year. Winners receive scholarships from the RVSB Board of Directors.

First place winner Elinor McGary is a student at North Medford High School. She won a $1,000 scholarship and will perform Strauss’ Horn Concerto No. 1 with the group.

The second and third place winners are Clara Dyson and James Dyson, both students at Ashland High School, who received scholarships of $500 and $300 respectively. They will not perform, but their biographies will be featured in the program.

A panel of judges based their decisions on the audition videos submitted by the contestants.

Asher Howell’s piece “Honor and Glory” will be performed and recorded by RVSB. The young composer is a student at South Medford High School.

Travis Muñoz will take the podium to conduct Bernstein’s Candide Overture. He majored in music at SOU.

The following numbers will be played:

n “Overture to Candide” by Leonard Bernstein, from an operetta based on the 1759 short story of the same name by Voltaire.

n Percy Grainger’s March of the Children, a playful piece with whimsical rhythms and unique tonal colors.

n “Horn Concerto No. 1” by Richard Strauss, one of only two composed by Strauss, who was himself a horn virtuoso.

n “D’un Matin De Printemps” by Lili Boulanger, a work of vibrant energy in the style of French “Impressionist” composers.

n “Honor and Glory” by Asher Howell, a “New Age” piece composed and arranged for a concert band by the student of South Medford High School.

n “Against Who, Rose” by Morten Lauridsen, originally written as the second movement of a choral cycle.

n “The Hounds of Spring” by Alfred Reed, based on a Victorian poem by Algernon Charles Swinburne. Elements of the good humor and innocence of tender love are reflected in the music.

The program will last approximately one hour with an intermission. Tickets, $15 for adults and $5 for children and students, can be purchased at Paddington Station, 125 E. Main St., in Ashland or online at roguevalleysymphonicband.org.

Christine Lundahl, conductor of the RVSB, is conductor of orchestras at SOU and assistant professor of instrumental music. In her freshman year at college, she is pleased with the group’s progress as COVID-19 wanes.

“I am very grateful for everything we have achieved this year,” she said, “despite the difficulties of the pandemic. There has been some amazing music made with this set.

She looks forward to raising community awareness of RVSB and expanding her audience.

“We are looking for donors to sponsor our band members and our season next year,” Lundahl said.

She invites those interested in supporting the RVSB to contact her at 541-552-6546 or by email at lundahlc@sou.edu.

Contact Ashland writer Jim Flint at jimflint.ashland@yahoo.com.

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The composer covers the main theme of Elden Ring in 15 different styles and they are all amazing https://allanpettersson.org/the-composer-covers-the-main-theme-of-elden-ring-in-15-different-styles-and-they-are-all-amazing/ Fri, 13 May 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/the-composer-covers-the-main-theme-of-elden-ring-in-15-different-styles-and-they-are-all-amazing/ If you’ve played Elden Ring, you know the weird thing that happens when you reach the game’s main menu and you’re somehow forced to sit on the screen for at least 30 seconds while listening to what’s going on. can only be described as a hugely hyped start to the day’s Elden Ring session (or […]]]>

If you’ve played Elden Ring, you know the weird thing that happens when you reach the game’s main menu and you’re somehow forced to sit on the screen for at least 30 seconds while listening to what’s going on. can only be described as a hugely hyped start to the day’s Elden Ring session (or is that just me?).

It’s a great song – orchestral, epic, and a great way to start the game every time you boot it up. However, what if it was composed in a different style, maybe like a symphonic metal song? Or maybe a lofi hip-hop track? Well, composer Alex Moukala did that and more. In fact, Moukala covered the main theme of Elden Ring in 15 different styles: Spanish Guitar, Nu-Disco, Symphonic Metal, Smooth Jazz, Lofi Hip-Hop, Darksynth, Movie Trailer, Piano Solo, Baroque (my favorite), Reggae, Big Room House, French House, Trap x Traditional Japanese (maybe also my favorite) and Orchestral.

As you can see in the video above there isn’t a single Moukala style remixing the Elden Ring theme that doesn’t work – if I booted the latest From Software which is great but still best when playing with friends, and one of those has started playing, I’d be just as excited as I am when I hear the standard theme. If you like these remixes, you’re in luck because Moukala does this all the time. It has other “X Game In 15 Different Styles” videos, rewrites and rearrangements of video game trailers, music analysis and much more. His whole channel is awesome!

For more from Elden Ring, read game informant Elden Ring review to find out why we gave it a 10 out of 10, then read why a game informant the publisher thinks From Software’s next game should prioritize co-op. Check out this story about how someone used a modified Fisher-Price baby controller to play Elden Ring on PC after that.


Which style is your favorite? Let us know in the comments below!

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CEWM’s Luncheon Musicale Benefit will feature vibraphonist and composer Patricia Brennan https://allanpettersson.org/cewms-luncheon-musicale-benefit-will-feature-vibraphonist-and-composer-patricia-brennan/ Fri, 13 May 2022 12:28:18 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/cewms-luncheon-musicale-benefit-will-feature-vibraphonist-and-composer-patricia-brennan/ Vibraphonist, marimbist, improviser and composer Patricia Brennan. Photo: K.Grabowsky LENOX — Close encounters with music (CEWM) will feature a Brooklyn-based Mexican-born vibraphonist, improviser and composer Patricia Brenan to Wyndhurst Manor Sunday May 15 at 12 p.m.for a performance and lunch to benefit the CEWM Commissioning Program, which supported the premieres of 22 works by 18 […]]]>

Vibraphonist, marimbist, improviser and composer Patricia Brennan. Photo: K.Grabowsky

LENOX — Close encounters with music (CEWM) will feature a Brooklyn-based Mexican-born vibraphonist, improviser and composer Patricia Brenan to Wyndhurst Manor Sunday May 15 at 12 p.m.for a performance and lunch to benefit the CEWM Commissioning Program, which supported the premieres of 22 works by 18 composers.

Patricia Brennan was born and raised in the Mexican port city of Veracruz on the Gulf of Mexico. (Brennan? Really? Yes! Her husband, Noel, is Irish.) She studied classical music with her grandmother, a concert pianist, and performed Mozart piano sonatas in student recitals when she was a child. But her father played percussion in Latin salsa bands, and throughout her childhood Brennan absorbed the sounds of her father’s music, as well as the Cuban and Afro-Cuban sounds that were popular in her own piece. Her mother introduced her to the music of Jimi Hendrix and Led Zeppelin.

Brennan joined the Youth Orchestra of the Americas at 17, touring all over the Americas and playing with people like Yo-Yo Ma and Paquito D’Rivera. Soon she was playing in the best symphony orchestras in Mexico, including the Xalapa and Mineria symphony orchestras, and winning several marimba competitions and competitions for young artists in Mexico and abroad.

Vibraphonist, marimbist, improviser and composer Patricia Brennan. Photo: Noel Brennan

If you listen to Brennan tell her story to be accepted in the highly competitive environment Curtis Institute of Music at 18, you’ll quickly realize that at the time, she had no idea how important it was to date Curtis. This is because she did not apply to Curtis but was invited by a teacher there who had heard her play with one of the jazz ensembles she worked with in New York.

From Curtis, Brennan went on to earn a master’s degree in New York Universitywhere it is now part of the Music Professions Auxiliary Faculty of Music and Performing Arts.

Brennan is a Grammy nominated member John Hollenbeck Grand EnsembleMatt Mitchell’s Phalanx Ambassadors, Michael FormanekEnsemble Kolossus, and various other “big” groups. (They don’t call them “big bands” because that reminds people of Benny Goodman and Glen Miller, which is a whole different kind of music.)

After playing for more than 10 years alongside prominent musicians in New York’s avant-garde jazz community, Brennan realized she had something to express and pursued that calling through improvisational music and composition, focusing on vibraphone and mallet percussion.

Having studied or played all types of music, from classical piano to jazz standards, Patricia Brennan has plenty of harmony bouncing around her head – enough to spare, obviously. And that comes out — little by little — in his improvisations and his compositions. As a composer, she’s on good terms with tonality, but not so friendly that she could ever be enslaved to it.

Brennan’s debut album, “Maquishti” is on the UK’s Top Albums of 2021 lists. Cablethe New York Timesand the New Yorker. She recently did an electronic revamp of “Maquishti” with percussionist, drummer and record player DJ Arktureye (Noel Brennan) and special guests. It is called “Maquishti Prismatic”.

To join the waiting list for this benefit concert, contact CEWM at 800-843-0778 or cewmusic@aol.com.

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INTERVIEW: Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood Composer Akira Senju on Creating Symphonic Alchemy https://allanpettersson.org/interview-fullmetal-alchemist-brotherhood-composer-akira-senju-on-creating-symphonic-alchemy/ Fri, 13 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/interview-fullmetal-alchemist-brotherhood-composer-akira-senju-on-creating-symphonic-alchemy/ the Fullmetal Alchemist is known for her varied and emotional music, both from the 2003 original Fullmetal Alchemist 2009 revival series Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood. Through each series and movies, composers Michiru Oshima (Fullmetal Alchemist and Fullmetal Alchemist: Conqueror of Shamballa), Akira Senju (Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood) and Taro Iwashiro (Fullmetal Alchemist: The Sacred Star of Milos) […]]]>

the Fullmetal Alchemist is known for her varied and emotional music, both from the 2003 original Fullmetal Alchemist 2009 revival series Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood. Through each series and movies, composers Michiru Oshima (Fullmetal Alchemist and Fullmetal Alchemist: Conqueror of Shamballa), Akira Senju (Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood) and Taro Iwashiro (Fullmetal Alchemist: The Sacred Star of Milos) captured the Elric brothers’ grand journey into the world of alchemy, state government, and the secret powers that worked behind the scenes. Milan Records, in coordination with Aniplex and Sony Music, is now releasing the original eleven Fullmetal Alchemist soundtracks of both series for the first time outside of Japan, which you can now listen to here! To celebrate the release, Crunchyroll had the chance to speak with Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood composer Akira Senju himself!

Senju, born in Tokyo in 1960, studied composition at Tokyo University of the Arts and went on to compose some of Japan’s best-known tunes, including the main themes for the 2012 release of iron boss, the score for Mobile Suit Victory Gundam and many more live action and anime series. We spoke with Senju about his approach to creating the music for the 2009 series, the difference between composing music for a live-action series and an anime, his friendship with JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure creator Hirohiko Araki and more!

Akira Senju

Akira Senju


How did you start composing music?

When I was in college, I knew I wanted to do something in the music world – classical, jazz, pop, soundtrack – I wanted to be in an environment where I could be passionate about all kinds of music. At that moment, I saw a straight path to my future and never changed my mind. I went ahead without hesitation. I enjoyed the effort to fulfill my dreams, my calling, so to speak.

You have also worked on many dramas and live TV shows. What are the differences between composing music for anime and live-action (if any)?

In dramas and live-action movies, there is a symbiosis between dialogue and sound effects. Anime generally has a longer runtime and therefore capacity for more music than live action, so I’m thinking more realistic expressions and original storytelling through music.

Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood

Can you describe your experience when you were asked to compose the music for Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood? Has the project had an impact on your career as a whole?

This is definitely epoch-making work for me, something I’ve only done a few times in my career. It was a work in which I was able to express everything I had done until then. And this work allowed me to then move on to the next stage of my career.

What was your experience with Fullmetal Alchemist before composing music for fraternity? Have you read the manga or watched the 2003 original series?

I didn’t listen to any of the previous works to avoid having preconceived ideas, and I didn’t end up really referencing them in my music. Instead, I carefully read the original work and created music that went through history from scratch. It was an exciting experience, especially towards the second half, because the original story was written at the same time as the animation, which was a new experience for me.

How did you work with director Yasuhiro Irie to create the music for the series?

The three of us, director Yasuhiro Irie and sound director Masafumi Mima, worked together very smoothly and professionally. We had great mutual trust, especially since it was an exciting project where we were working simultaneously with the original work.

When I think of the sounds of Fullmetal Alchemist, I always remember those grand overtures (an orchestral introduction to a song) that seem to capture the feeling of the overwhelming Amestris government. Otherwise, how did you try to capture that sense of the great institutional power of the State Alchemists in the series?

I worked mainly with the great symphony orchestra and the choir (Warsaw Philharmonic Choir) in order to express this power.

Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood

Is there a particular song that you enjoyed the most composing for Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood?

“Main Theme – The Alchemist” is the track I enjoyed the most composing, because it best describes the world of this work in one song.

Now that you three Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood original soundtracks will be available for streaming, what do you hope fans will notice or pick up when listening to your music?

I think music is responsible for an expression that cannot be put into words. For me, this work is over ten years old, but it is definitely a masterpiece. I tried to give the work a sound that will not age regardless of the years that pass, with a spirit that is both universal and timeless. I hope you enjoy another world of Fullmetal Alchemist in this music.

Akira Senji main theme cover
(Picture via Akira Senju website)

I also understand that JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure designer Hirohiko Araki drew you for an album cover of your most famous music tracks. Are you a fan of the JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure series?

Hirohiko Araki and I respect each other as creators of the same age. We are very close in our personal lives, and as friends I asked him to design our 30th anniversary album cover. I like JoJo’s Bizarre Adventure series.

Do you have anything else to say to fans of your music around the world?

I sometimes present parts of the Fullmetal Alchemist score in my concerts, but I would like to hold a Fullmetal Alchemist concert one day.

Listen to all Fullmetal Alchemist
series soundtracks here!



Kyle Cardine is the editor of Crunchyroll. You can find his Twitter here.


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Mead’s outgoing Composer-in-Residence of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra talks about making music for the next generation | Chicago News https://allanpettersson.org/meads-outgoing-composer-in-residence-of-the-chicago-symphony-orchestra-talks-about-making-music-for-the-next-generation-chicago-news/ Wed, 11 May 2022 01:45:37 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/meads-outgoing-composer-in-residence-of-the-chicago-symphony-orchestra-talks-about-making-music-for-the-next-generation-chicago-news/ Since the age of 4, Jessie Montgomery has found solace in music. “Music has always been a way out or a way out for me. For all my life,” says Jessie Montgomery. “Music is a place where you can let your thoughts go. You are there to be quiet and listen and be in the […]]]>

Since the age of 4, Jessie Montgomery has found solace in music.

“Music has always been a way out or a way out for me. For all my life,” says Jessie Montgomery. “Music is a place where you can let your thoughts go. You are there to be quiet and listen and be in the space of sound and let it overwhelm you. It can be very therapeutic and very empowering.

At age 11, Montgomery had composed his first play. What she’s learned since is what brought her to CSO, where she’s Mead’s composer-in-residence, a role she took on last fall.

“It’s an incredible opportunity right now to be a part of this community and to bring my experience as a musician, as a violinist, as a composer, as an advocate for diversity in classical music,” Montgomery said.

Some of Montgomery’s pieces include “Strum”, “Hymn for Everyone”, and “Overture”. It was through her work as a violinist in other orchestras that she learned to compose for other instruments.

“To learn to write for the symphony, I had to study scores by composers I liked, watch which part plays what. Then remember and remember what it’s like to sit in an orchestra and hear what sounds are coming from where,” Montgomery said. “’Overture’ performed on May 23 is unique in that the orchestra is in unison, playing in rhythm the entire time, except that at one point they break up. And there are two sections that do two different things. But essentially, it’s the whole orchestra that breathes this rhythmic gesture together. That’s what I also played with in terms of orchestration… how can I get the most resonance with this set?

Montgomery’s works have also been performed by the next generation of contemporary classical musicians, students of the Chicago Musical Pathways Initiative.

“That’s really the point of what I do,” Montgomery said. “I make music so it can be transferred beyond the time I’m here. It’s just affirming to have this exchange with young people in general.

At the end of her residency, Montgomery says she will continue to make music, both as a composer and a violinist, with one goal in mind.

“I want people to take away — whatever they come up with — that they have a new perspective on music, that they feel like they’ve been part of something special,” Montgomery said. “There’s no right way to hear music. That’s ultimately what we do as composers. We’re trying to create a space for people to both create something they feel good about, but have a new, open-minded experience for the audience.

Jessie Montgomery’s “Overture” debuts at the Harris Theater on Monday, May 23. Tickets start at $20.


Follow Angel Idowu on Twitter: @angelidowu3

Angel Idowu is the JCS fund of the artistic correspondent of the DuPage Foundation.


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The artistic group Maricopa will pay tribute to the composer Judith Lang Zaimont https://allanpettersson.org/the-artistic-group-maricopa-will-pay-tribute-to-the-composer-judith-lang-zaimont/ Fri, 06 May 2022 18:30:39 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/the-artistic-group-maricopa-will-pay-tribute-to-the-composer-judith-lang-zaimont/ Judith Zaimont is an accomplished composer whose work has been performed internationally. [Submitted] Internationally renowned composer Judith Lang Zaimont will be honored by the Maricopa Friends of the Arts. Zaimont, a 17-year Maricopa resident and tour de force for the city’s cultural scene, is co-director of the Maricopa Arts Council and founding member of the […]]]>

Internationally renowned composer Judith Lang Zaimont will be honored by the Maricopa Friends of the Arts.

Zaimont, a 17-year Maricopa resident and tour de force for the city’s cultural scene, is co-director of the Maricopa Arts Council and founding member of the Maricopa Music Circle. She will be recognized for her talents and accomplishments at a Friends of the Arts meeting at 5:30 p.m. on May 18 at the Maricopa Public Library and Cultural Center.

The celebration will include a gift of appreciation for Zaimont, as well as a video presentation showcasing his compositions.

Zaimont’s music is performed worldwide to sustained critical acclaim, including performances by the Philadelphia Orchestra, BBC Symphony, Berlin Radio Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony and National Philharmonic. His music has been broadcast on Voice of America and appears regularly on mainstream radio stations in the United States and Europe.

Zaimont’s works have won numerous awards across all genres and continue to be commissioned for international competitions for voice, conducting, chamber music and piano performance.

His distinguished career began in New York with early success as a child pianist, including a television appearance on “The Lawrence Welk Show” at age 11, performances at Carnegie Hall and recordings. Zaimont’s talents as a musical leader led to her 36-year career as a world-renowned music teacher, composer, writer and essayist. His compositions have been recorded and performed all over the world.

Maricopa Friends of the Arts is dedicated to supporting, promoting and developing the arts in Maricopa. Meetings are held every two months and are open to members and the public. Each meeting features performances or presentations by local artists. For more information and upcoming events, visit Maricopa Friends of the Arts on Facebook.

For more information about Zaimont, visit its website.

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Legendary Composer and International Rock Star YOSHIKI Reveals Concert Dates in Las Vegas and Mexico as Special Guest on Sarah Brightman’s “A STARLIGHT SYMPHONY” Tour This Fall https://allanpettersson.org/legendary-composer-and-international-rock-star-yoshiki-reveals-concert-dates-in-las-vegas-and-mexico-as-special-guest-on-sarah-brightmans-a-starlight-symphony-tour-this-fall/ Fri, 06 May 2022 02:12:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/legendary-composer-and-international-rock-star-yoshiki-reveals-concert-dates-in-las-vegas-and-mexico-as-special-guest-on-sarah-brightmans-a-starlight-symphony-tour-this-fall/ “A Starlight Symphony” is a concert experience featuring Brightman alongside an orchestra and choir, with a guest performance by YOSHIKI. With two of music’s biggest names coming together in a rare live musical performance, fans of these acclaimed international artists can come together to celebrate music in this magical once-in-a-lifetime event. Additionally, YOSHIKI’s special concert […]]]>

“A Starlight Symphony” is a concert experience featuring Brightman alongside an orchestra and choir, with a guest performance by YOSHIKI. With two of music’s biggest names coming together in a rare live musical performance, fans of these acclaimed international artists can come together to celebrate music in this magical once-in-a-lifetime event.

Additionally, YOSHIKI’s special concert “YOSHIKI: Live at Carnegie Hall” is now available for the first time on demand at PBS passport. He packs New York City legendary Carnegie Hall for two consecutive incredible performances featuring the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra.

Advance ticket sales for these shows began on Tuesday, May 3rd. Very special “VIP Experience” packages are also available HERE and are sure to make a memorable Mother’s Day gift!

LA VEGAS PRESALE TICKETS:
May 3rd 12:00 PT/3 p.m. ET until Thursday May 5and @ 10:00 p.m. (Pacific Time)/1 a.m. ET


MEXICO PRESALE TICKETS:
May 3rd 12:00 p.m. until Thursday May 5and to 10:00 p.m.

TOUR DATES:
10/12 VegasNV Venetian Theater at The Venetian Resort®*
10/14 VegasNV Venetian Theater at The Venetian Resort®*
10/15 VegasNV Venetian Theater at The Venetian Resort®*

10/18 Zapopan (Guadalajara)MX Auditorio Telmex
10/19 MonterreyMX Arena Monterrey
10/21 PueblaMX Auditorio Metropolitano
10/22 Mexico CityMX Arena CDMX

General On sale:
Vegas the shows begin Friday, May 6 @ 10:00 a.m. (Pacific Time)/1 p.m. ET
Mexico the shows begin Friday, May 6 @ 10:00 a.m.

ABOUT YOSHIKI:
Named one of the most influential composers in Japanese history, YOSHIKI has sold over 50 million albums and singles worldwide to date as the leader of X JAPAN and as an accomplished solo artist. A classically trained pianist, YOSHIKI has composed a wide range of pieces, from the theme song for the Golden Globes to a piano concerto for the Emperor of Japan. As a classical artist, YOSHIKI headlined Carnegie Hall with his special live concert Yoshiki: Live at Carnegie Hall broadcast on PBS stations nationwide. He collaborated with Beatles producer Sir Georges MartinQueen, Sarah Brightman, The Chainsmokers, Bono, will.i.am and St. Vincent. Fashion icon and creator of designer brand Yoshikimono, YOSHIKI modeled for YSL Beauty and was the first Japanese man to appear on the cover of vogue Japan. YOSHIKI recently received a Medal of Honor from the Emperor of Japan for his charitable efforts through his nonprofit Yoshiki Foundation America. His own character Sanrio yoshikitty was created by designer Hello Kitty Yuko Yamaguchiand YOSHIKI also inspired the comic book series Blood Red Dragon written by Stan Lee. YOSHIKI also has its own range of wines from Napa Valley in collaboration with Robert Mondavi Jr.

IN REGARDS TO SARAH BRIGHTMAN:
Known for her three-octave range and for pioneering the classical-crossover music movement, Sarah Brightman has amassed worldwide sales of over 30 million units. The only artist to have simultaneously surpassed Billboardin dance and classical music charts, Brightman has accumulated more than 180 gold and platinum awards in more than 40 countries. She is also known for her iconic star turn The Phantom of the Opera, whose soundtrack has sold over 40 million copies worldwide. His duet with Bocelli, “Time To Say Goodbye”, became an international hit selling 12 million copies worldwide. Brightman’s albums Eden, The Moon, Haremand Symphony were each at the top of the charts Billboard hits and accompanied by world tours. Additionally, Brightman has performed at such high-profile events as the 2007 Concert for Diana, the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, and the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Yoshiki social networks:
Instagram: @YoshikiOfficial
YouTube: @Yoshiki
Twitter: @YoshikiOfficial
Facebook: @YoshikiOfficial

Sarah Brightman Social media:
Facebook: @SarahBrightmanMusic
Twitter: @SarahBrightman
Instagram: @SarahBrightmanMusic
YouTube: @sarahbrightman

MEDIA CONTACT:
Anderson Group Public Relations
[email protected]
323.655.1008

SOURCE YOSHIKI

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