Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 06:06:16 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://allanpettersson.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-19-120x120.png Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ 32 32 Album Review – “Songs I Swore Never To Sing” by Benjamin Tod https://allanpettersson.org/album-review-songs-i-swore-never-to-sing-by-benjamin-tod/ Mon, 26 Sep 2022 16:10:42 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/album-review-songs-i-swore-never-to-sing-by-benjamin-tod/ When it comes to the story of how country music was saved in the modern age, it’s the post-punk roots musicians who should be given the deserved credit for starting the revolution. They are the ones who took over the traditions rejected by the mainstream. They were the first to return to Lower Broadway in […]]]>

When it comes to the story of how country music was saved in the modern age, it’s the post-punk roots musicians who should be given the deserved credit for starting the revolution. They are the ones who took over the traditions rejected by the mainstream. They were the first to return to Lower Broadway in Nashville when it was still a seedy place full of pawnshops and adult bookstores. They were the first to cultivate self-sustaining local networks from Music Row to Nashville, creating lasting careers and ultimately launching bona fide superstars.

Benjamin Tod is the embodiment of this archetype of post punk roots. As a high school dropout who spent much of his youth hopping on trains and performing on the streets to earn tattered dollars, he’s the kind of character many other underground artists have emulated. Raised in Cottonwood, Tennessee, Benjamin Tod met his wife and violinist Ashley Mae in Muhlenberg County, Kentucky when they were still teenagers. They played music in a band called Barefoot Surrender and eventually formed the Lost Dog Street Band in 2010, coined after the couple’s beloved Labrador Retriever Daisy.

By this time, however, the underground country scene was already shedding its heyday and moving more towards the Appalachian revival that we see today inherent in artists like Tyler Childers and Sierra Ferrell. But Benjamin Tod and the Lost Dog Street Band survived the total implosion of that era through dogged determination and because they fit into those two eras. And while all the DIY attitude inherited from the punk era became less necessary as labels and independent reps rose up to support worthy artists, Benjamin Tod and the Lost Dog Street Band remained faithful. to their principles and did not play the game.

The approach remains very DIY, and attitudinal. Not playing tag ball, only seeking media attention earlier this year, Benjamin Tod is as quick to complain about the sleazy nature of the business as he is about his substance abuse and mental health issues. . A site like Saving Country Music? Of course, it’s never about Benjamin Tod and Lost Dog, because it’s not real. This guy from Trigger is bought and paid as much as anyone. But of course, that pride also kept Tod from asking for help either. As he sings in the opening song of the Lost Dog Street Band’s latest album released earlier this year, titled Glory,

I won’t compromise or sign with thieves
I’m the trash outsider of the underground scene
Only enjoy when I compete
With a knife in my back, outnumbered by three
I’m on the wrong track hanging from the caboose
I can turn all the chaos into shelter and food
And I may not be pretty like all your tools
But I fight like a tramp and I work like a mule

This same do-it-yourself attitude is brought to the music itself. With minimal effort put into the arrangement – ​​and Benjamin’s vocal delivery being rather dry and almost down-to-earth in its mood – it kept much of the audience away from this music. It sounds underground, in a roots style which especially imploded ten years ago with the dissolution of the .357 String Band and the disappearance of Hank3. But it’s the songs and the stories that can’t be denied, and what has sustained Benjamin Tod despite his heavy-handed, principled attitude, and even crowned him one of the preeminent songwriters of our time, regardless of the adversity imposed on him, by himself and others.

Although Benjamin Tod loves to tell you that it’s all done by himself, the YouTube channel Gems on VHS also played a big part in his success over the past five years, with his video rendition of “Using Again” topping some 11 million views, and several other videos on the channel racking up 7-figure stats. . Again, it’s unclear whether it was Gems on VHS’ support that launched Benjamin Tod into the subterranean stratosphere, or if it was Gems on VHS that benefited Benjamin. They both rode the insatiable craving for authenticity in music that has hyper-accelerated during the pandemic.

The title of this solo project by Benjamin Tod entitled Songs I swore never to sing is to be taken literally. Consisting of 10 songs recorded in just six hours, some of the tracks were written 10 years ago, while others are more recent. What ties them all together is how Tod rated them all as too painful to perform. The loss of his dog, the death by suicide of his former bandmate Nicholas Ridout of the Spitshire Band and the potential splits from his wife Ashley Mae are the types of topics discussed here. This Tod was ready to share them all now, and together it resulted in arguably the best collection of songs in his catalog.

Recorded completely acoustically and alone, with just a little natural room reverb to spruce up the cues, Songs I swore never to sing is a ruthless unloading, scathing piece of self-assessment and bloodshed, blessed with an incredibly poetic transmission that makes the words resonate far beyond any instrumental accompaniment could achieve. These songs deserve to be naked. This album is essentially Benjamin Tod lying prostrate on the floor, with no seams or covers. Judge if you want, but you can never accuse him of not being raw and honest.

These are the recitations of a man standing at the edge of a precipice, looking over the edge of a cliff, or down the barrel of a gun, or down into a pill bottle, and choosing to exorcise her pain in words rather than more catastrophic alternatives. No wonder this stuff is too painful to share before. Having to relive those moments while performing those compositions must have been heartbreaking in itself, not to mention turning them into some sort of commercial product to share with the world.

“He will not be nominated, awarded or appreciated by this world as he should be,” Benjamin Todd scolded the release of this album. “Their industry is too mundane and superficial to even elicit any real emotion. It’s a relic of something that’s lost to the masses. I too am becoming obsolete in this world from every mirror axis.

There is definitely some truth in that. But it is also Benjamin Tod who is proud of his fight, because it is in the grip of a restless, tired and hungry emotion that his muse emerges. That’s what you hear on this album, which tones down criticism of some earlier efforts by focusing attention solely on its songs.

The truth is, Benjamin Tod has become more beloved and successful than some fledgling artists signed to major labels these days, or many indie musicians in the middle tier. And Songs I swore never to sing very well may be the record where the rest of the country and roots world wakes up to what it has with Benjamin Tod.

1 3/4 raised guns (8.5/10)

– – – – – – – – – –

Purchase of Benjamin Tod

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Composer hails Queen after writing music for her funeral as a ‘true defender of the faith’ https://allanpettersson.org/composer-hails-queen-after-writing-music-for-her-funeral-as-a-true-defender-of-the-faith/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 11:10:06 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/composer-hails-queen-after-writing-music-for-her-funeral-as-a-true-defender-of-the-faith/ Composer hails Queen after writing music for her funeral as a ‘true defender of the faith’ Calendar An icon of a desktop calendar. to cancel An icon of a circle with a diagonal line across it. Caret A right-pointing solid arrow icon. E-mail An icon of a paper envelope. Facebook An icon of Facebook’s “f” […]]]>





Composer hails Queen after writing music for her funeral as a ‘true defender of the faith’



































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Rise Composer Ré Olunuga on Infusing Disney’s Score with Greek and African Influences, and Exploring Themes of Love and Family – Below the Line https://allanpettersson.org/rise-composer-re-olunuga-on-infusing-disneys-score-with-greek-and-african-influences-and-exploring-themes-of-love-and-family-below-the-line/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 00:53:15 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/rise-composer-re-olunuga-on-infusing-disneys-score-with-greek-and-african-influences-and-exploring-themes-of-love-and-family-below-the-line/ To go up picture via Disney+ There are very few NBA players who are as dominant as Giannis Antetokounmpowho has been dubbed “The Greek Freak” due to his jaw-dropping athletic prowess. Giannis has averaged more than 26.9 points per game in each of the past five seasons and has been named an Eastern Conference All-Star […]]]>

To go up picture via Disney+

There are very few NBA players who are as dominant as Giannis Antetokounmpowho has been dubbed “The Greek Freak” due to his jaw-dropping athletic prowess.

Giannis has averaged more than 26.9 points per game in each of the past five seasons and has been named an Eastern Conference All-Star for the past six straight years. It is also a two-time NBA MVP, NBA Finals MVP (2021) and was named to six All-NBA Teams. Need I say more? His resume speaks for itself, and yet what doesn’t show up in the box score every night is the trip that Antetokounmpo has even pledged to qualify for the league first.

He didn’t do it alone…he had his family with him every step of the way, and it’s that family that turns out to be the heart and soul of To go up, which is now streaming on Disney+. Giannis and his four brothers grew up playing professional basketball in one capacity or another, while Thanasis and Costas joined Giannis to become the first trio of brothers to win an NBA championship – a feat they all owe to the hard work and support of their parents, who never wavered in their dream for their sons.

The original music for the film, taken from Re Olunugawhich ranges from melancholic to uplifting, and perfectly complements the central family theme. under the line spoke to Olunuga a while ago, and the composer revealed how he landed his first studio project, why he imbued the score with Greek and African influences, and why the theme of family was so important in this story .

Re Olunuga

Image by Ré Olunuga via Disney+

Below the line: how many projects have you scored before To go up?

Re Olunuga: Oh I did that [for] 16 years old [but] To go up is the first studio project that I did. Still, [I’ve composed scores for] a long, long time back home in Nigeria and [done some] other projects that are kind of continental, and I’ve done projects in the UK as well.

BTL: With To go up being your first studio project, and under Disney no less, how did the opportunity arise? And is there something in the history of the Antetokounmpo family that attracted you to the project?

Olunuga: There’s a lot of things about the project that when people see this movie, they’re going to connect with [them] because, basically, it is [about] something we can all identify with: family. [Family is] the heart of this film and the love that can exist within a family is unlike anything else.

At the time when the studio and the filmmaker were looking for composers, what I had heard [was that they were] just trying to be as authentic as possible. At the same time, on my side, I was trying to develop myself — I was trying to jump [into] studio movies and bigger projects and we were just kind of looking for the same thing, and the first conversation I had with the filmmaker [Akin Omotoso] lasted for hours. I felt like I understood what they were looking for, [and] they liked what I presented and the approach I would have.

We [had] other conversations and really knew what we were looking for; we knew what we wanted the audience to feel and what we wanted to deliver in terms of cinematic stories. But above that, it’s about families and the sacrifices parents typically make to position their children for better opportunities. [and] a better life, that sort of thing.

To go up

To go up picture via Disney+

BTL: What were you trying to accomplish with your music for this film?

Olunuga: I think when you approach a score, there’s a big question that I, as a composer, try to answer in an interesting way. You ask exactly what a moviegoer would ask – “What does it look like?” – and I have to think of something that seems to answer this question [and] the studio question, but also answers the questions of “How can I write something that is interesting for me?” and “How can I write something new for me?” so that the writing process is not too difficult [and I’m] excited to put something together.

With this movie, the way I responded to that was by taking a big, orchestral, symphonic sound that most people recognize as [the way that] Disney music sounds, but with my own personal accent [and] giving him a reason to include [certain] musical philosophies, this phraseology that I always thought would be interesting.

I thought that [a] score of this scale could be interesting but I had not had the opportunity to explore this [yet] and it was just perfect. It was very nuanced; there are ideas in there that will appeal to music nerds, but the most important thing was that the audience felt what was at the heart of each scene.

To go up

To go up picture via Disney+

BTL: Can I ask you to describe your score in three words or less?

Olunuga: Wow… can we come back to this question?

BTL: Yes, of course. Were there any unique techniques or instruments you used for this score?

Olunuga: There were ideas that I always thought of that I had the opportunity to store in this score, one of them [being] using rhythm as a pattern. I think it’s very useful to create emotional connections with characters and relationships [and attach that] to a sound by creating a melody.

But I’ve always wondered about – in this composer’s toolkit – the idea of ​​using rhythm and just living. It can happen in percussion, it can happen with instruments that are mostly monotonous, and [it can] grow so that it can create greater ascension. That was one of the things I loved exploring in this score which included so many African instruments. [We wanted to] create something cohesive, take classical Western instruments and African percussion instruments, as well as Greek instruments, and infuse that with this style of Afrobeat drumming.

I’m not [one] force together [a] multi-genre piece of music, but for everything to cohesively interact with each other, it was another great opportunity, another great artistic homage happening. I’m so glad [about] how it went, and there’s nothing like working with brilliant musicians, people who are right at the top of their game and are emotionally sensitive enough to know what you’re looking for and know what you aim.

To go up picture via Disney+

BTL: To go up has been streaming on Disney+ for a few months, so what do you hope audiences have taken away from it now?

Olunuga: I think every person [can] connecting memories of what it’s like to start a family, or what it’s like to work hard to achieve your dreams and support your children, [and] how your parents support you. There are so many incredible things happening in the film, and it’s all the more beautiful because it’s [a] true [story].

But one of the things that stood out to me throughout the process was [that] although life can be difficult, it is necessary to keep in mind the things that are most important to you, and you must keep your hands on [those]. This family [the Antetokounmpos] kept that bond together. They say they’re always together throughout, they go through every decision, every challenge, [and] every success together. I think right now, basically, I see a lot of conflict about fiction in our world, and the more we can share stories like this, [we can see] how alike we are and how important and helpful it is to reach out to each other. [The more we] helping each other, the better.

BTL: Before concluding, I must go back to my previous question. Did you think of three words or less to describe your score?

Olunuga: Well… what was the longest pause of a composer on this question? Is there a recording?

BTL: There’s no official record, but there were a few times they asked to go back on it…but they did answer, Re!

Olunuga: Yes, because I think the music itself is what I’m trying to convey, and words aren’t enough. But I would say this [score is] “moving”, “warm” and “festive”.

Rise is now streaming on Disney+.

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Ramsey Lewis, jazz master, composer, also put tunes on Top 40 radio https://allanpettersson.org/ramsey-lewis-jazz-master-composer-also-put-tunes-on-top-40-radio/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 11:44:04 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/ramsey-lewis-jazz-master-composer-also-put-tunes-on-top-40-radio/ The success spawned other pop hits and introduced Lewis to a large national audience. His talent for moving the crowd during this live recording also betrayed a natural ability to reach the listener. “Ramsey was a great artist,” said Gary Motley, jazz pianist and director of jazz studies at Emory University. “He knew how to […]]]>

The success spawned other pop hits and introduced Lewis to a large national audience. His talent for moving the crowd during this live recording also betrayed a natural ability to reach the listener.

“Ramsey was a great artist,” said Gary Motley, jazz pianist and director of jazz studies at Emory University. “He knew how to work a piece. He would connect with people and really play with his audience.

Lewis, 87, died Monday, Sept. 12 at his home in Chicago.

He grew up in Chicago’s infamous Cabrini-Green housing projects. Trained as a classical pianist, he also played in church from childhood. Both sources emerged in his music, which shared the same gospel-inspired hard bop championed by Horace Silver and Bobby Timmons.

A performance by Ramsey Lewis offered romantic ballads and standards, but as the evening wore on he had the audience on their feet. “Slowly but surely by the time we get to the middle of the show, I’m starting to move into songs that are a little more shaken up if you will,” he told NPR.

Atlanta jazz trumpeter and big band leader Joe Gransden grouped Lewis with artists such as Lee Morgan and Herbie Hancock, whose tracks “Sidewinder” and “Watermelon Man” (respectively) also enjoyed chart success and brought soulful swing jazz to a much wider audience.

“They were able to have a creative improvisation to a more danceable groove that was more palatable to millions of people,” Gransden said. “The result not only helped their careers, but helped jazz music reach a wider audience.”

Lewis repeated the pop-jazz combination a few times, with a cover of “Hang on Sloopy”, “Summer Breeze” (from Seals and Crofts), “Dancing in the Street” and several Beatles tracks, including “And I Love Her” and “A Hard Day’s Night”.

“Some jazz players who were more purists might have ridiculed him a bit,” said Geoffrey Haydon, professor and piano coordinator at Georgia State University. “On the other hand, this guy was bringing music to people who otherwise might not know it. He’s not Art Tatum, he’s not Oscar Peterson. He was a dirt player. down to earth that most of the audience could immediately identify with.

Motley, who worked with Lewis bassist Cleveland Eaton, said a Lewis performance was smartly constructed. The pianist knew how to “read the piece, construct a solo. How do you build it to a peak, how do you get people in? Ramsey was the master of this.

In the 1970s, Lewis leaned into R&B. His former drummer, Maurice White, had then founded Earth, Wind & Fire, and co-wrote and produced the album “Sun Goddess” by Ramsey Lewis. This album, with its electric keyboards, put Lewis back on the pop charts.

But Lewis never left jazz behind, said Alterman, who opened for Lewis several times at New York’s Blue Note, and has stayed in touch over the years. “People lock him into this soul-funk stuff,” Alterman said, “but people don’t know what a great pianist he was.”

Lewis’ success with “The ‘In’ Crowd” seemed to happen by accident. His trio was recording a live album at the Bohemian Caverns in Washington, D.C., in 1965, and, sitting in a nearby cafe, they discussed finding one more track to end the evening. A waitress at the store suggested the then-popular Dobie Gray tune and blasted a quarter of it into a jukebox to demonstrate.

The trio worked out a quick “head” arrangement and played it as a set-ender. The live recording picks up the joyful shouts and cheers of the crowd, giving the hit single the loose, buzzy feel of a party that has just taken off.

The tune peaked at number five on the singles chart, placing the Ramsey Lewis Trio in territory that jazz musicians rarely visit. Fans kept asking for it throughout his career.

In 2016, Lewis told NPR “I’ve got people coming backstage, and some of them say, ‘my parents had that record,’ and some of them say, ‘my grandparents had that record. “. It looks like it has stood the test of time.

Lewis worked as an educator to bring attention to jazz traditions. He hosted a weekly radio show and then a public television series, both titled “Legends of Jazz with Ramsey Lewis”, featuring live performances by Dave Brubeck, Tony Bennett, Chick Corea, David Sanborn, Clark Terry, Benny Golson, Eddie Palmieri, Pat Metheny, Phil Woods and many more.

He also began composing for orchestra later in life, and in his 80s performed his own piano concerto with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra.

The National Endowment for the Arts proclaimed him “Master of Jazz” in 2007, the highest honor given to jazz musicians by the NEA.

ExploreRead and sign Ramsey Lewis’ online guestbook
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Composer Viet Cuong creates new works as part of the SPCO Sandbox Composer Residency program https://allanpettersson.org/composer-viet-cuong-creates-new-works-as-part-of-the-spco-sandbox-composer-residency-program/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 10:01:18 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/composer-viet-cuong-creates-new-works-as-part-of-the-spco-sandbox-composer-residency-program/ The St. Paul Chamber Orchestra got the idea for its new Sandbox Composer Residency program from composer Joseph Haydn. “The idea was born out of a thought experiment I had at the start of the pandemic,” said Kyu-Young Kim, SPCO’s artistic director and lead violinist. “What if the SPCO could have a composer-in-residence like Haydn […]]]>

The St. Paul Chamber Orchestra got the idea for its new Sandbox Composer Residency program from composer Joseph Haydn.

“The idea was born out of a thought experiment I had at the start of the pandemic,” said Kyu-Young Kim, SPCO’s artistic director and lead violinist. “What if the SPCO could have a composer-in-residence like Haydn at Esterhazy? What if a composer today could truly experiment and innovate like Haydn did?”

Haydn, dubbed the “father of the symphony” and the “father of the string quartet”, attributed much of his originality to having an orchestra at his disposal for three decades in the 18th century in a remote Hungarian palace. Today, such relationships rarely develop. Composers usually arrive a few days before the premiere with a final score in hand.

This Sandbox residency is considerably more collaborative, with three different composers each spending five weeks with the SPCO. They will bounce off musicians’ ideas, try out fragments, take part in workshops of orchestral and chamber works, and then create them at subscription concerts.

The first composers invited to play in this sandbox are Viet Cuong, Clarice Assad and Gabriela Lena Frank. Cuong’s residency has already started.

“It’s a dream scenario to have five weeks in a season to develop, work on, rehearse and unveil a play,” Cuong said. “It takes the pressure off of having to deliver something nearly perfect the first time around.”

In addition to premiering a new work at this week’s SPCO concerts, the 32-year-old American composer will continue to refine a work in progress during a rehearsal on Thursday at 10 a.m. open to the public.

This piece – currently titled “Now and Then” – is set to be completed and premiered during the SPCO concerts from November 25-27, with discussions with the public after each performance. Cuong and the orchestra rehearsed the latest version of the score Wednesday at the Ordway Concert Hall, engaging in lively conversation between passages. The composer tossed around ideas for possible revisions, and the musicians responded with their own suggestions.

“The idea is to capture a spirit of innovation, experimentation and co-creation,” Kim said. “Our first workshop with Viet was exactly in that spirit. He wrote five short sketches which we performed, but then also started to deconstruct and piece together with input from the musicians.”

Cuong said “Now and Then” was conceived when he attended SPCO concerts featuring JS Bach’s “Brandenburg Concertos” in December 2021. He began considering using the harpsichord and performing with it. Bach-style chord progressions. The composer returned with these fragments in February and they were fleshed out during the workshops in May.

Assad is next, arriving in the spring and having a few pieces in the works in June. Frank’s residency will take place during the 2023-24 season.

“What the SPCO has developed with the Sandbox residency is unprecedented,” Cuong said. “What’s most special is how the SPCO has put collaboration and community at the heart of these commissions. … We’ve developed mutual trust.”

Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra

Open rehearsal with Sandbox composer in residence Viet Cuong: 10 a.m. Thursday; Ordway Concert Hall, 345 Washington St., St. Paul; $15.

Concerts of works by Haydn, Cuong and Mozart: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church, 12650 Johnny Cake Ridge Road, Apple Valley; 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Friday, Wooddale Church, 6630 Shady Oak Road, Eden Prairie; 8 p.m. Saturday, St. Paul’s United Church of Christ, 900 Summit Av., St. Paul; 2 p.m. Sunday, Benson Great Hall, 3900 Bethel Drive, Arden Hills; $10 to $26 (free for students).

Tickets: Available at 651-291-1144 or thespco.org.

Rob Hubbard is a classical music writer from Twin Cities. Contact him at wordhub@yahoo.com.

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🌱 Brooklyn composer turns 90 + Woman walks through restaurant window https://allanpettersson.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-brooklyn-composer-turns-90-woman-walks-through-restaurant-window/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 20:57:37 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-brooklyn-composer-turns-90-woman-walks-through-restaurant-window/ Hello everyone ! It’s me, Carlie Houser, your Daily host. Let’s dive into Sunday. Born in Brooklynworld-renowned composer Stanley Walden is about to celebrate his 90th birthday and the man still writes scores. As a teenager, Walden was inspired by Walt Disney’s film “Fantasia,” after a childhood relatively dry of any kind of musical exposure. […]]]>

Hello everyone ! It’s me, Carlie Houser, your Daily host. Let’s dive into Sunday.

Born in Brooklynworld-renowned composer Stanley Walden is about to celebrate his 90th birthday and the man still writes scores. As a teenager, Walden was inspired by Walt Disney’s film “Fantasia,” after a childhood relatively dry of any kind of musical exposure. Since the 1950s he has continued to support legendary artists in music, theater and dance, completed his military service with solo clarinet performances with the 7th Army Symphony Orchestra in Europe, had a stint with the New York Philharmonic, was a faculty member at the Juilliard School, founded the Music/Performance Department at Berlin University of the Arts, and received a Grammy nomination for the score for the Broadway musical “Oh! Calcutta!” Another inspiring story from one of Brooklyn’s many creatives. (Desert Sun)

What else is going on?

  • NYC Announces Humanity Coalition for Haiti
  • Mayor wonders about cruise ships
  • A motorist entered a restaurant
  • Ultra-Orthodox schools under the microscope

First, today’s weather forecast:

☀ Rather sunny and wetter. High: 85 Low: 70.


Here are the top stories in Brooklyn today:

1. People gathered in the Little Haiti neighborhood of Brooklyn to deal with the economic and humanitarian crisis in Haiti. The new Humanity Coalition for Haiti follows a meeting between government officials in New York and officials in the Dominican Republic to discuss a range of issues related to commercial aid. As a representative of one of the largest concentrations of Haitians outside of Haiti in Flatbush, Brooklyn, State Senator Kevin Parker addressed the issues of the growing number of Haitian refugees and the need for a deeper communication between governments to address the rapidly developing humanitarian crisis. now in Haiti.

Brooklyn Daily Eagle

2. The city has seen more than 11,000 asylum seekers arrive in the past two months—these figures are unprecedented. Buses used to arrive a few days a week, but now at least 8 drop off people and families each day at the Port Authority Bus Terminal. The city is desperately struggling to house these migrants, and Mayor Eric Adams is exploring the legality of setting up temporary accommodations on cruise ships.

CBS News

3. An elderly woman drove her car straight through a restaurant window in Brighton Beach, causing serious injury to a midday customer having lunch. Seemingly indifferent – leaning against the wrecked car and smoking a cigarette – the driver mentioned that the brakes on her Honda CRV had failed and she had lost control of the vehicle. The elderly man who was punched and injured in the incident is currently in critical condition in Lutheran Hospital. Our thoughts are with him and his family.

MetroLaw

4. After every student failed a series of standardized tests in 2019 at the Central United Talmudical Academy, ultra-Orthodox schools in New York come under scrutiny. This week, New York’s Board of Regents approved, for the first time, rules aimed at addressing longstanding allegations that dozens of ultra-Orthodox private schools, called yeshivas, are defying state law. by failing to provide instruction in English, mathematics and other basic subjects, deliberately depriving some 50,000 students of a basic secular education. The regulations seek to restore mandates that require private schools to provide an education “substantially equivalent” to that received in public schools.

The post of Jerusalem


Today in Brooklyn:

  • 📸 Free Mini Family Photoshoots, Dumbo Waterfront, today at 9 a.m. | Details
  • Brunch Bushwick, Street Art and Open Studios, OTIS, today at 12 p.m. | Details
  • One-day screenings and $8 tickets, Coney Island Film Festival, today at 1 p.m. | Details
  • Cirkus Luna of Dzieci Theatre, Brooklyn’s Old Stone House, today at 3 p.m. | Details

🐝Brooklyn Buzz


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Carlie Houser

About me: I am a recent graduate based in Brooklyn, NY. I like to write, run, read and find new restaurants and places in town.

Got a news tip or suggestion for an upcoming Brooklyn Daily? Contact me at brooklyn@patch.com

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Israel will celebrate the centenary of composer Fikrat Amirov https://allanpettersson.org/israel-will-celebrate-the-centenary-of-composer-fikrat-amirov/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 08:25:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/israel-will-celebrate-the-centenary-of-composer-fikrat-amirov/ By Laman Ismayilova The Israeli city of Haifa will host a concert scheduled for the 100th birthday of prominent Azerbaijani composer, founder of the symphonic mugham genre Fikrat Amirov, reports Azernews. The concert program will include the Concerto on Arabic Themes for Piano and Symphony Orchestra by Fikrat Amirov, written with the famous composer Elmira […]]]>

By Laman Ismayilova

The Israeli city of Haifa will host a concert scheduled for the 100th birthday of prominent Azerbaijani composer, founder of the symphonic mugham genre Fikrat Amirov, reports Azernews.

The concert program will include the Concerto on Arabic Themes for Piano and Symphony Orchestra by Fikrat Amirov, written with the famous composer Elmira Nazirova.

The Haifa Symphony Orchestra will perform at the concert on December 25. The orchestra will be conducted by People’s Artist of Azerbaijan Yalchin Adigozalov.

Fikrat Amirov managed to synthesize folk music and mugham traditions with modern musical techniques.

The composer wrote the first Azerbaijani lyrical and psychological opera on a contemporary theme. In Sevil opera, the composer used a variety of musical forms.

Amirov’s Shur and Kurd Ovshari symphonic mughams are unprecedented in the history of world music.

He is the author of numerous operas, ballets, symphonies, symphonic poems, symphonic mugham, suites, capriccio, piano concertos, sonatas, musicals and songs, love songs, piano pieces, music for dramatic productions and films.

Fikrat Amirov’s legacy, which calls for patriotism, always instills spiritual wealth and glorifies human ideals, is one of the brightest pages in the history of Azerbaijani music.

UNESCO will celebrate the centenary of Fikrat Amirov. The decision was announced at UNESCO’s 41st General Conference in Paris.

Following the joint activities of the Ministries of Culture and Foreign Affairs, the Permanent Mission of Azerbaijan to UNESCO and the National Commission for UNESCO, the relevant nomination documents have been submitted to UNESCO.

The events have been included in the anniversary program for 2022-2023.

Follow us on twitter @AzerNewsAz

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How Rings Of Power Composer Bear McCreary Imitated Howard Shore’s Lord Of The Rings Score [Exclusive] https://allanpettersson.org/how-rings-of-power-composer-bear-mccreary-imitated-howard-shores-lord-of-the-rings-score-exclusive/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 12:48:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/how-rings-of-power-composer-bear-mccreary-imitated-howard-shores-lord-of-the-rings-score-exclusive/ One thing that made Shore’s score for “Lord of the Rings” special was its use of rare instruments with a long history, like the Norwegian Hardanger fiddle used for the Rohan motif. McCreary used the same technique, which he has implemented throughout his career, using cultural musical instruments from around the world in everything from […]]]>

One thing that made Shore’s score for “Lord of the Rings” special was its use of rare instruments with a long history, like the Norwegian Hardanger fiddle used for the Rohan motif. McCreary used the same technique, which he has implemented throughout his career, using cultural musical instruments from around the world in everything from “Outlander” to “Battlestar Galactica.”

“It’s something I’ve researched my entire career. And that research has been incredibly helpful in making [this show]McCreary told us. McCreary used some of the same instruments that Shore had used to give the show a sense of continuity, such as using the Hardanger fiddle, as well as the Swedish nyckelharpa to create the Southlands sound.

“That way I’m trying to create something continuous with what Howard Shore has been doing. Howard had a Celtic influence on the Shire and on hobbits that he really filtered through a British folk music lens.” In the case of “The Rings of Power”, McCreary uses “Uilleann pipes from Ireland, small Scottish bagpipes from Scotland, a Bodhran, which is a frame drum used in Irish music that has this quality of vocal tone , and Irish whistles. and tin whistles” to create the sound of the Harfoots, letting the public know through sound that these halflings will eventually settle down and their sound will change from Celtic to a more British folk music color in thousands of years in the Shire.

As McCreary describes it, his music is not the same as Shore’s. “They’re different, but they’re continuous. And I loved the idea of ​​being able to use those colors to tell that story.”

“The Rings of Power” is streaming on Prime Video.

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Bear McCreary Interview – ‘Rings of Power’ Composer Talks ‘Lord of the Rings’ Soundtrack, Series Reception https://allanpettersson.org/bear-mccreary-interview-rings-of-power-composer-talks-lord-of-the-rings-soundtrack-series-reception/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/bear-mccreary-interview-rings-of-power-composer-talks-lord-of-the-rings-soundtrack-series-reception/ Bear McCreary was just a student when The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers premiered in 2002. But the lifelong Tolkien fan – who years later would become Amazon’s composer Rings of power—already had an idea of ​​the musical score he would write. Growing up in Bellingham, WA, the dew-covered evergreens and snow-capped mountains […]]]>

Bear McCreary was just a student when The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers premiered in 2002. But the lifelong Tolkien fan – who years later would become Amazon’s composer Rings of power—already had an idea of ​​the musical score he would write. Growing up in Bellingham, WA, the dew-covered evergreens and snow-capped mountains of the Pacific Northwest reflected the living world of Middle-earth in her imagination. “It’s a very Shire-like community,” McCreary tells me. “I loaded that into my brain and The two towers opens by flying over the mountains of New Zealand. It felt like it was alive to me. I thought, ‘I was right there!'”

rings of power is the first billion-dollar streaming series, making it the most expensive television ever produced. The show follows that of Peter Jackson The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, which not only is among the highest-grossing film series of all time, but also won the only Best Picture Oscar ever given to a high-fantasy adventure series. You can hear the legacy (and huge budget!) in Bear McCreary’s score for the new prequel series, which features an orchestra of around 90, a choir of 40 deep voices and some of the best instrumental soloists, all filled as desired. capacity at London’s legendary Abbey Road Studios.

In his career thus far, McCreary has scored some of the most defining fantasy series franchises of the modern era, including The Walking Dead, Battlestar Galactica, Outlander, marvel’s Agents of SHIELD, and even video games. (God of the warhave you ever heard of it?) They all led to his magnum opus in The Rings of Power—a comprehensive work, which combines his industry experience with his own intense fandom. The challenge, says McCreary, “was unlike anything I had ever faced.”

It took McCreary over a year to plan 37 unique tracks and compose the nearly two and a half hours of music that make up power rings original soundtrack. Along the journey, he explored new characters, expanded the musical identities of popular heroes like Galadriel and Elrond, and scored never-before-seen cities, like Episode Three’s climax, Numenor. Finally able to breathe and enjoy the show as fanthe composer has only unbridled enthusiasm for the road ahead.


ESQUIRE: I just finished Episode 3. We’re finally going to see Numenor! I know you already told fans at the premiere this rings of power would surprise them. How do you think the reception has gone so far now that it’s out?

Bear McCreary: I think the reception has been fantastic. And I have to say, especially with episode three – as a fan of the books and movies – the idea of ​​seeing Numenor made with a big budget, screen fame is something that has interested me for a big part of my life. I’m only now seeing the first reactions to episode three and that’s all I would have hoped for. And that’s just me speaking as a fan watching the show! To be able to write music for this, as a fan, I’m so excited for episode three and beyond.

What was that experience like – not only having this amazing opportunity to follow Howard Shore’s iconic score, but also being a lifelong fan of that world and being able to add a piece of it yourself?

BM: Well, that’s a perfect way to describe it. I can add a piece to the puzzle – contribute something to a larger work that I have consumed all my life. I mean, I think I was ten when I read The Hobbit, and there’s music built into this story from the very first chapter. Even then, I remember thinking, “Wow, this world is very musical. When this new show was announced, I was far enough along in my career to allow myself the indulgence to think, What if I had to score this show? And it was really a dream to consider, which I was at the time. But it was really a dream come true to then be able to use those skills that I developed over my years as a fan of sci-fi, fantasy, and horror movie soundtracks. It shaped the course of my life, and being able to use those skills to give back to the greater The Lord of the Rings the mythology is amazing. It really is a wonderful feeling.

“Of all the themes I’ve written, Elrond is the one I’ve struggled the most with.”

Amazon Premier

Is there anything you’ve learned from your past work on fantastic projects, like God of the war Where Foreign— that you were able to bring to power rings?

Absolutely. Not only was there the legacy of Howard Shore’s iconic work, but we also have protagonists and main characters in six different cultures. Each of these different cultures – Harfoots, Elves, Dwarves, Low Men, High Men and Orcs – required a unique style of music, instruments and musical traits. Plus you have two characters outside of all those cultures, “The Stranger” and Sauron, plus eight different languages ​​I had to write in that all fit into the larger framework of The Lord of the Rings. So it’s not that previous work influenced this work, it’s that I went back to those same wells and tapped into the same influences as before.

When I hear the melody of Numenor, to me it sounds a lot like the kind of great hymns that definitely had a big influence on Foundation. The Nordic influences that I sought out and drew from when composing God of the war— the Swedish nyckelharpa, the Nordic Hardanger fiddle, the hammered dulcimer — found themselves in the Southlands. Dwarfs ended up with deep male voices. In Battlestar Galactica, at the beginning of my career, I explored Middle Eastern and Japanese percussion which ended up in the score. Also—it should be obvious—my love of Celtic music which I explored in Foreign ended up being useful for the Harfoots. So, in a way, I had to take everything I ever liked and use it to help create a sense of distinction for each of these cultures.

“That feeling of being in front of these musicians and feeling the air hit my body – the resonance through the floor and the podium – I almost cried.”

Did you have a favorite character that you worked on, as a fan of when you were younger, that made you think, Wow, I can finally mark the journey of this character?

Yes, but that was actually the problem. It was Elrond. Of all the themes I’ve written, Elrond is the one I’ve struggled the most with. And really, I have to shout out [showrunners] JD Payne and Patrick McKay for walking me through the character and story as it exists now. Because, from the Peter Jackson books and movies, I have this image of Elrond as a wise authority figure. And yet the Elrond we meet power rings is younger. I had to forget about this character I loved in the books for a moment and really focus on who he is when we meet him now. I wrote this theme which is very melancholic and innocent and starry, but it also has this trick in it. So in a way, my love of books sometimes caused me to take a wrong turn at first because I want to tell a story that evolves into that. But it was really fun to take on these musical challenges.

numerator

“I wrote my Numenor theme, and I was really proud of it. It captured everything I wanted Numenor to feel. It was like Camelot.”

Amazon Prime

Also, I imagine you must have developed a lot of these themes before seeing any footage from the show. What was it like when it finally got together?

BM: Yes, I generated a list of themes after reading the script and talking extensively with the showrunners. And I also got to watch the first two episodes in raw form. But that meant I wasn’t able to see Numenor or see the orcs well yet. I had to write the themes for the whole season, but the story was so vivid in my imagination that it wasn’t a problem. I’ve thought about it all my life. I formed a picture in my mind of what I wanted these themes to look like, and really, when I was writing these themes, the only concern was whether the visuals would measure up. I wrote my Numenor theme, and I was really proud of it. It captured everything I wanted Numenor to feel. It was like Camelot. When I finally saw the pictures, it just blew my mind. For me, the reveal of Numenor in episode three was one of the most magnificent sequences I’ve had the opportunity to score in my career.

You were able to go into the studio and direct the final episode after about two and a half years away due to the pandemic. What was it like to be back in person and experience your music live?

It was an incredible experience, and one of my fondest memories to mark this first season of power rings. Doing weekly television, I would lead, without exaggeration, 50 live sessions per year for several years in a row. Then everything stopped. I Directed Marvel’s Finale Agents of SHIELD. not knowing that it would take me two and a half years before taking over the direction of an ensemble. I was writing music every day for nine months in order to get all the rings of power written music…and that feeling of being in front of these musicians and feeling the air hit my body – the resonance through the floor and the podium – I almost cried. And actually, after the first take, I kind of crumbled. It was very emotional, and it was really good to be back on the podium and making music in real time, doing what I’ve always loved to do.

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Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra appoints Esa-Pekka Salonen as Composer-in-Residence https://allanpettersson.org/berlin-philharmonic-orchestra-appoints-esa-pekka-salonen-as-composer-in-residence-2/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 01:37:38 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/berlin-philharmonic-orchestra-appoints-esa-pekka-salonen-as-composer-in-residence-2/ The Finnish conductor and composer will take on the role for the 2022/23 season. As the current musical director of the San Francisco Symphony OrchestraEsa-Pekka Salonen is the laureate conductor of London Philharmonia Orchestraafter serving as Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor from 2008 to 2021. He was also Music Director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic […]]]>

The Finnish conductor and composer will take on the role for the 2022/23 season.

As the current musical director of the San Francisco Symphony OrchestraEsa-Pekka Salonen is the laureate conductor of London Philharmonia Orchestraafter serving as Principal Conductor and Artistic Advisor from 2008 to 2021. He was also Music Director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic where he served from 1992 to 2009, and the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra.

He is currently in the Multiverse Esa-Pekka Salonen, a two-season residency as composer and conductor of the Elbphilharmonie Hamburg. As a member of LA faculty Colburn Schoolhe runs the Negaunee Pre-Professional Conducting Program.

He is the co-founder of the annual Baltic Sea Festival and in 2020 received an honorary KBE from Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II for his services to music and UK-Finland relations.

At the Berlin Philharmonic, concerts will include a wide range of Salonen’s music inspired by Dada Karawaneto his last bedroom Saltat Sobriusand the German premiere of the organ concerto.

As a composer, he has a vast catalog of compositions written for a multitude of soloists and types of ensembles. In the next season, his works will be performed by the Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Australian Ballet, Music 21, Seattle Symphony Orchestra, Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, among others.

“I write music that touches something inside me,” Salonen said, in the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra’s announcement. “Initially, I also see myself as a receiver, as a listener. When I write a song, I play it first in my head. If the listener in me thinks it’s good and interesting, exciting or moving, so I write it. If I like it myself, chances are that others, perhaps many, will like it too.

“I want music – and especially my music – to be part of society,” he continued. “What I can’t stand are people who take themselves too seriously. There always has to be room for irony and laughter, otherwise life would be unbearable.

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