united states – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 21:26:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://allanpettersson.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-19-120x120.png united states – Allan Pettersson http://allanpettersson.org/ 32 32 At ‘Hope in the Night’, PostClassical Ensemble gives black composer William Levi Dawson an expected spotlight https://allanpettersson.org/at-hope-in-the-night-postclassical-ensemble-gives-black-composer-william-levi-dawson-an-expected-spotlight/ Sun, 20 Mar 2022 17:53:52 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/at-hope-in-the-night-postclassical-ensemble-gives-black-composer-william-levi-dawson-an-expected-spotlight/ But Friday’s program also served as an evening prep session on composer William Levi Dawson (1899-1990). A skilled arranger of spirituals and longtime conductor of the Tuskegee Institute Choir, Dawson was also an exquisitely talented composer whose voice fills a remarkable silence in the history of modern American music. (On that note, PostClassical executive producer […]]]>

But Friday’s program also served as an evening prep session on composer William Levi Dawson (1899-1990). A skilled arranger of spirituals and longtime conductor of the Tuskegee Institute Choir, Dawson was also an exquisitely talented composer whose voice fills a remarkable silence in the history of modern American music. (On that note, PostClassical executive producer Joseph Horowitz recently penned an illuminating study of these divergent traditions in “Dvorak’s Prophecy.”)

In addition to a spotlight on Dawson, the evening also featured an appearance and conversation with another towering figure in classical music, no subset required: George Shirley, the first black tenor to take the stage at the Metropolitan. Opera. A recording of his 1961 debut as Ferrando in Mozart’s ‘Così fan tutte’ greeted the audience as we took our seats.

Before the concert, Shirley, 87, talked about growing up in a home more steeped in the Grand Ole Opry than opera, learning music in Detroit public schools, becoming the first black man to join the choir of the United States Army and to honor the mentors and teachers who led him to the most prestigious stages in the world. (Shirley also wrote the foreword to Horowitz’s book.)

“That’s how it works,” he said. “Doors that have been closed are always opened by someone inside who realizes that the person outside belongs inside.”

After the lecture, Shirley joined a loud (and audibly popular) Ellington School chorus – conducted with finesse and careful attention by Monique Spells – through the deftly tinged arrangement of “There’s Balm in Gilead ” from Dawson, who gave the spiritual a new glow. Shirley still has a voice that hits the back of the room, its fine gravel traces like the fluted edge of a medal.

From there, PCE musical director Angel Gil-Ordóñez and his 58-piece cast immersed themselves in Dawson: the world premiere of the composer’s “Negro Work Song,” as well as the DC premiere of his unsung 1934 landmark. , “Negro Folk Symphony”.

From start to finish, PostClassical proved to be an orchestra in fighting form, with compelling storytellers in its ranks. Notably Gil-Ordóñez, who gave the “Work Song” a living, breathing vitality, with the weight and permanence of a monument you regularly pass but barely notice. With his solitary opening trumpet he gathers and wins; a cello roars and the orchestra responds. eight or more the minutes that follow – their harmonic surprises and melodic memories, their soaring strings and sagging horns – had time capsule magic in their unfolding.

The Philadelphia Orchestra premiered “Negro Folk Symphony” in 1934. (It was adored by Leopold Stokowski.) Significantly, a performance was also broadcast on CBS radio, reaching ears far beyond the walls of the concert hall. A New York Times review of the premiere noted a stubbornly upright audience “remaining to applaud long and vigorously, and to call Mr. Dawson back to the stage several times”.

After Friday’s performance, it’s easy to see why. The “Folk Symphony”, divided into three movements, weaves samples of folk music into a vibrant tapestry of vernacular languages. Spirituals such as “Oh M’ Lit’l Soul Gwine-A-Shine” and “Hallelujah, Lord, I Been Down Into the Sea” emerge, reconfigure and reinvent themselves as the work develops.

Its haunting second movement, from which the program takes its title, is one of the most emotionally powerful pieces of music I’ve heard this year – its “Trinity” of gongs, its towering harmonic overhangs and its extended – a bed of strings rising and singing like a breath, fading away to the rhythm of a setting sun.

The evening concluded with an experience of sorts: a spirited run through Louis Moreau Gottschalk’s “La nuit des tropiques” performed by a stack of members of the PostClassical Ensemble and the talented (and amply endowed) student orchestra DESA, with Gil-Ordóñez and DESA conductor Isaac Daniel, splits the duties on the podium. (Daniel also serves as assistant principal, a remarkably effective way to control his orchestra.)

Gottschalk’s piano chops, natural stage direction, and omnivorous musical appetite (informed by the New Orleans-born composer’s Creole heritage, as well as his extensive travels to Cuba and South America) have earned him a international fame in the middle of the 19th century. Gottschalk was also something of a maximalist, staging “monster” concerts – a “Tannhäuser” for 14 pianos, for example, or a “William Tell” overture for over 20 pianos.

So this mini-monster – which maxed out the DESA stage capacity at 86 – felt like a fitting homage to the explosive performance of the complete work in 1860 Havana, for which Gottschalk collected nearly 900 musicians and singers.

But it also felt like a fitting reminder of why we’re tackling music we’ve never heard in the first place. It helps us reconstruct the past, of course; but ideally it helps us narrow down the future.

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Highly sought-after composer Reena Esmail launches new piece with the Seattle Symphony https://allanpettersson.org/highly-sought-after-composer-reena-esmail-launches-new-piece-with-the-seattle-symphony/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/highly-sought-after-composer-reena-esmail-launches-new-piece-with-the-seattle-symphony/ For its opening concert last September, when the Seattle Symphony returned for its first full season since the pandemic hit, it was the music of Reena Esmail that kicked off the program. She continues her role as composer-in-residence with the world premiere of a newly commissioned violin concerto for SSO’s 14th annual Celebrate Asia concert […]]]>

For its opening concert last September, when the Seattle Symphony returned for its first full season since the pandemic hit, it was the music of Reena Esmail that kicked off the program. She continues her role as composer-in-residence with the world premiere of a newly commissioned violin concerto for SSO’s 14th annual Celebrate Asia concert on March 20.

Also available for streaming, the concert, conducted by Kahchun Wong, additionally features the US premiere of “Three Muses in Video Game,” a trombone concerto by Tan Dun co-commissioned by the SSO, as well as music by Toshio Hosokawa. and Claude Debussy.

The phrase “highly sought-after composer” may sound like hype, but it’s no exaggeration in the case of Los Angeles-based Esmail. Its schedule for 2022 alone includes 11 world premieres of compositions ranging from a solo cello piece to a major choral work commemorating 100 years of women’s suffrage.

The new violin concerto in the Celebrate Asia program belongs to this harvest of new works. Created in close collaboration with renowned Indian classical violinist Kala Ramnath, the concerto exemplifies Esmail’s signature practice of bringing Western and Indian classical musical traditions into mutually enriching dialogue.

As part of the Celebrate Asia commitment, Esmail, 39, will also host a program on Indian classical music with Ramnath and the orchestra members on March 18 at 8 p.m. at SSO’s Espace Octave 9. Esmail spoke about the new concerto she created with Ramnath – and what it means for different cultures to listen to each other. (This conversation has been lightly edited for length and clarity.)

It was originally announced as part of Thomas Dausgaard’s inaugural season that you would create a concerto for sitar virtuoso Guarav Mazumdar to commemorate the centenary of Ravi Shankar’s birth. After the pandemic shutdown made that impossible, how did the project turn into your collaboration with Kala Ramnath and an Indian classical violin concerto?

I still wanted to find a way to work with an Indian musician with whom I had a close relationship. Kala Ramnath, who lives in the Bay Area, is the outstanding Hindustani violinist in the world today and has a major following in the Diaspora community. She is deeply rooted in the classical Indian tradition but also has a way of communicating outside of it. The first time I collaborated with Kala was in 2016 to arrange music she had composed for the Kronos Quartet. To understand how the Hindustani violin works, I watched his videos, stopping frame by frame. You can imagine how thrilled I was when Kala called me and asked me to collaborate on a project involving the theme of climate change and how it can be represented in music. It then became the cornerstone of my residency at the Seattle Symphony.

What can we expect from the new concerto? How did you and Kala Ramnath work together to compose it?

It’s in five movements, with a little postlude, and each movement explores one of the classic Indian elements — the five elements that are used in Ayurvedic medicine, for example: space, air, fire, water and land.

As a rule, I work like a Western composer and invent everything myself. In this case, a lot of the raw material comes from Kala, and I work with these melodies in the orchestra. She played me snippets of ideas in some ragas [in Indian classical music, the framework in which certain types of melodies can be improvised]. We would then have conversations about how each of us heard a particular element of the melody – through my Western lens and through his Hindustani lens. I tried to surround what Kala plays with something that would be Western counterpoint but still allow her to play it and hear it in her own way.

Are the melodies provided by Kala Ramnath original inventions or are they part of the traditional ragas?

A combination of both. They clearly belong to very specific ragas that any Indian classical musician would recognize. But the way the melody works to represent a certain thing is his invention. For example, she uses a raga called Deepak, which is for fire – in fact, it may even be considered dangerous to sing this raga, as people are afraid that it will cause things to burn. Kala then brings in the raga for the water to neutralize the fire.

What distinguishes the Hindustani fiddle from its Western counterpart?

It’s essentially the same physical instrument, with a bow. But the strings are tuned much lower, so there is a little less tension, and the instrument sounds completely different – and is also micro. You will see Kala playing it while seated on the floor, holding the roll of the violin in her lap.

What type of audience do you both have in mind?

There’s an incredibly intricate tapestry of what it means to be South Asian in America right now. This includes people from India as well as people like me who grew up here but have parents from the diaspora. It’s exciting to see how all of these diverse communities come together for an event like this.

I tried to make the orchestra as classical as possible, because Kala wants to be able to play the piece with other orchestras wherever she goes. And also because I try in my music in general to make each group of musicians feel as comfortable as possible in what they have to do so that they can focus on the collaborative aspect listening to each other, building the space between their traditions instead of necessarily trying to penetrate it.

Seattle Symphony – Celebrating Asia Concert

4 p.m. March 20; Benaroya Hall, 200 University St., Seattle; $33 to $105; 206-215-4747, seattlesymphony.org

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Gara Garayev – world famous Azerbaijani composer, whose music is rooted in the traditions of Azerbaijani folk – AZERTAC https://allanpettersson.org/gara-garayev-world-famous-azerbaijani-composer-whose-music-is-rooted-in-the-traditions-of-azerbaijani-folk-azertac/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 14:12:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/gara-garayev-world-famous-azerbaijani-composer-whose-music-is-rooted-in-the-traditions-of-azerbaijani-folk-azertac/ Baku, March 9, AZERTAC The world famous Azerbaijani composer, Gara Garayev left a deep imprint on the musical culture not only of Azerbaijan, but of the whole world. His compositional art received wide recognition, both in Azerbaijan and far beyond its borders and achieved worldwide fame. Garayev was a pupil of Shostakovich, considered one of […]]]>

Baku, March 9, AZERTAC

The world famous Azerbaijani composer, Gara Garayev left a deep imprint on the musical culture not only of Azerbaijan, but of the whole world.

His compositional art received wide recognition, both in Azerbaijan and far beyond its borders and achieved worldwide fame.

Garayev was a pupil of Shostakovich, considered one of the major composers of the 20th century and whose music is heavily indebted to the music of his native Azerbaijan.

Garayev’s impact on Azerbaijani national symphonic, chamber instrumental and vocal genres, film music, opera and ballet was enormous.

His music is rooted in the traditions of Azerbaijani folk. The impact of folk music studies with the eminent Uzeyir Hajibayli, founder of classical music in Azerbaijan is clear.

He wrote ballets, including Seven Beauties (1952) and The Path of Thunder (1957); an opera Motherland (co-written with J. Hajiyev (1945); three symphonies (1943, 1946, 1964); a symphonic poem, Leyli and Majnun (1947); Albanian Rhapsody (1952); Don Quixote Symphonic Engravings (1960); 24 Preludes for piano (1951-1963); a Violin Concerto (1967); incidental film music, The Fires of Baku (1951), The Conqueror of the Sea (1965) and many other works.

Garayev’s symphonic pieces are part of the repertoire of the greatest orchestras in the world. After having toured in many countries, “Seven Beauties” was finally staged in 2014 in San Diego (California), for the first time in the United States.

Gara Garayev became a groundbreaking modern composer of the 20th century, whose works have appeared in many concert halls around the world, including the countries of the former Soviet Union, Europe and the United States.

Between 1949 and 1953, Garayev served as dean of the Azerbaijan State Conservatory, and from 1965 to 1982 as president of the Union of Composers of Azerbaijan, as well as secretary of the Union of Composers of the USSR.

The distinct architecture of Garayev’s works, the beauty of his melodies, and the innovative harmonic and orchestral language of his music are striking.

AZERTAG.AZ :Gara Garayev – world famous Azerbaijani composer, whose music is rooted in the traditions of Azerbaijani folk

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March 15 concert in honor of the work of composer Mauricio Kagel https://allanpettersson.org/march-15-concert-in-honor-of-the-work-of-composer-mauricio-kagel/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 16:27:35 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/march-15-concert-in-honor-of-the-work-of-composer-mauricio-kagel/ Professors from three Louisiana universities will perform in a tribute concert to composer Mauricio Kagel on Tuesday, March 15 at 7:30 p.m. at Magale Recital Hall. Attendees include, from left, Northwestern State professor Dr. John Dunn and Paul Christopher, and NSU student Taylor Carrell of Henderson Texas. Faculty and students from Northwestern State University will […]]]>
Professors from three Louisiana universities will perform in a tribute concert to composer Mauricio Kagel on Tuesday, March 15 at 7:30 p.m. at Magale Recital Hall. Attendees include, from left, Northwestern State professor Dr. John Dunn and Paul Christopher, and NSU student Taylor Carrell of Henderson Texas.

Faculty and students from Northwestern State University will join guest artists from Louisiana Tech and the University of Louisiana at Monroe to pay tribute to composer Mauricio Kagel on Tuesday, March 15 at 7:30 p.m. at Magale Recital Hall. Dr. John Dunn will present a pre-concert talk at 7 p.m.

Admission is free and open to the public. University COVID protocols will be in effect. Those present are asked to wear a mask. A livestream of the concert will be available at capa.nsula.edu/livestream.

Seamless gutters

Kagel was an Argentinian-born German composer, filmmaker, teacher and writer. He was renowned for the whimsy, humor and originality of his works, which often blur the distinction between musical performance and theatre, as well as the boundaries between performer and audience.

The performers are NSU student Taylor Carrell of Huntington, Texas, Northwestern State College Paul Christopher and Dr. Oliver Molina, Trevor Davis and Gregory Lyons of Louisiana Tech, Mel Mobley of the University of Louisiana in Monroe.

Born and raised in Huntington, Texas, Carrell is currently a music education student at Northwestern State. He is a member of the Spring 2022 NSU Wind Symphony. Taylor Carrell is currently studying tuba with Dr. Masahito Kuroda.

Christopher received his Bachelor of Music Education from the New England Conservatory of Music and his Masters in Cello Performance from the University of Memphis. In 2005, Christopher joined the string faculty at Northwestern State where he is currently an associate professor of cello and music theory. He has performed as a clinician, judge, and guest artist in the United States and abroad. Christopher’s articles have appeared in American String Teacher, Bass World, the Jacques Offenbach Society Newsletter and Strings. In 2017, he received the Mildred Hart Bailey Research Award in recognition of his outstanding scholarship as a faculty member at NSU.

Davis is assistant professor of single reeds and director of jazz activities at Louisiana Tech. He is a Silverstein artist and is an active clinician, judge and performer. Since moving to Louisiana, he often fills in for the Monroe Symphony Orchestra, the Shreveport Symphony Orchestra, and the South Arkansas Symphony Orchestra. During the summers, he performs clarinet and saxophone for the new music festival New Music on the Bayou.

Dunn is an assistant professor of fine arts at Northwestern State, where he also serves as course instructor for core curriculum fine arts courses. At NSU, he taught fine art inquiry, music history, music for stage and screen, a history of opera, a music seminar, and music studies. disability and several music theory courses. He is currently Chairman of the Faculty Senate and was the faculty sponsor of the NSU Gamers’ Guild. He recently completed his doctorate at Louisiana State University in musicology; her thesis explored the representation of disability in the music of Alfred Hitchcock’s films.

Lyons teaches Applied Percussion, Percussion Sets, Percussion Methods, Secondary Instrumental Methods, and Introduction to Non-Western Music at Louisiana Tech University where he is an associate professor and assistant band director. Recently, he was awarded the James Alvey Smith Endowed Professorship with support funds from the Louisiana Board of Regents. He received the BME from Wheaton College Conservatory, the MM from Central Michigan University and the DMA from Ohio State University.
Mobley was named 2019 Performing Artist of the Year by the Northeast Louisiana Arts Council. As a composer, conductor, performer and advocate for new music, he has performed at many premieres and festivals across the country. As principal percussionist of the Monroe Symphony Orchestra and a frequent performer with the Shreveport, South Arkansas and Rapides Symphonies, Mel also performs with numerous chamber groups including the Implosion Percussion Group, NMB Percussion Group and M2.

Molina is an associate professor of music and assistant band director at Northwestern State. As an active percussion performer, educator, arranger, judge, and clinician, Molina has presented and performed at various State Percussion Day events, PASIC, NCPP, and other conferences and festivals in music. He earned his Doctor of Musical Arts degree in Percussion Performance and Pedagogy at the University of Iowa under Dr. Dan Moore. Additionally, he is a founding member of the Omojo Percussion Duo and the Ninkasi Percussion Group.

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A Conversation with Pianist, Composer and Conductor Adam Burnette https://allanpettersson.org/a-conversation-with-pianist-composer-and-conductor-adam-burnette/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 13:00:53 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/a-conversation-with-pianist-composer-and-conductor-adam-burnette/ Adam Burnette is a pianist, bandleader and composer from Chatsworth, Georgia. He has worked across the United States, from the Kennedy Center to Indiana State University, and in Europe. His work was recently featured in NewMusicShelf Anthology of New Music: Trans and Nonbinary Voices, the very first volume of songs written by and/or for transgender […]]]>

Adam Burnette is a pianist, bandleader and composer from Chatsworth, Georgia. He has worked across the United States, from the Kennedy Center to Indiana State University, and in Europe. His work was recently featured in NewMusicShelf Anthology of New Music: Trans and Nonbinary Voices, the very first volume of songs written by and/or for transgender and non-binary people.

Quotes have been edited for clarity. Content Warning: Suicide.

How and when did you first get into music?

I think I was always destined to be a musician. I started playing the piano when I was three, and I think I was just a little obsessed with it. There was a teenage girl playing, and I was just in love with what she was doing and the sound, my parents never really encouraged her, so I kind of found that on my own. I started playing when I was very young, I took a year of lessons when I was five years old. In sixth grade, I took a year of lessons with this lady who taught classical music. But I couldn’t read music, so I imitated what she was doing, and after six or seven weeks, I learned a piece [of music]. My teacher would just throw music at me, and that’s how I learned to read it. It was a sort of trial by fire. In second, I started taking classes again with a teacher who offered me a full scholarship. The first year it was one lesson per week, then we started doing two lessons per week.

I auditioned at Indiana University and got in. I started choir conducting, then opera conducting and orchestra conducting and I made my debut at the age of 25 at the Kennedy Center with the National Symphony Orchestra.

Have you ever found music to be a comfort or a type of therapy during difficult times in life?

I was probably playing six hours a day and luckily my family never told me to stop. I woke up in the morning and played before taking a shower, and at night I still played before going to bed. I think it’s something about the vibration of the string hitting the fingerboard that’s therapeutic, and I understood that at a very young age. [Music] is my identity.

Have you noticed that the world of classical/contemporary music includes musicians who are not straight and/or who are not cis? Is it a diverse career field in that regard?

Yes, in the world of opera, that’s not a problem, and it’s fantastic. We are all here for the music. If it’s good music, it’s good music, whoever wrote it. I think the music world is very inclusive… I’ve played with musicians from all over, Russia, China, Korea, Tunisia, South Africa, Australia, and they’re all fun! There’s a certain universality that we all have, it’s all about music.

One of your upcoming projects is included in an anthology of trans and non-binary music. How important do you think this is for the world of classical music?

I think it’s much more important than the classical world. I think that’s fine, but I think that’s a much broader statement than the classical world. It’s important that people see that.

What about the anthology that made you want to submit your work?

I had this childhood friend named Mark, and he was so genuine, and I absolutely loved that. I knew I was gay at four [years old], and I never told anyone about it. But in 7th grade I met Mark, and in 8th grade he was the first person I talked to.

I didn’t see him for 20 years, but one day I heard he was in town and we saw each other again. I could tell that he had lived 20 very troubled years, that he had really struggled. He had always been in between, which is why I think he was non-binary. We had a great day that day, we had climbed the mountain and jumped off the rocks and had a great time. Then I found out that I had gone to bed and he had committed suicide. The next day I sat down at the piano and wrote a piece. There were no erasures, it just came out. The last line [of the piece] says the birds are dead, the flowers won’t bloom, everything green is dead, and now he can cry. I don’t know, it really spoke to me. I just wish Mark’s mother died two years ago and she couldn’t see this play written for her son.

If you can tell me, I would like to know what is or could be your next project? Would you like to stay in the classic genre or would you consider branching out one day?

I’ve always composed, it’s always been kind of a hobby. Last year, I had four articles published. I was always a little nervous to send my music, rejection is pretty hard and also because the compositions are like your kids, and if people don’t like your kids, that’s not a great feeling, you know? I finally worked up the courage to send some stuff, and it ended up being pretty successful. And I hope that will remain the case and that the trend will continue.

Finally, who is your favorite composer and why?

Bach, all the way. He did it all, man!

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300 Songs: One Konal | The star of the day https://allanpettersson.org/300-songs-one-konal-the-star-of-the-day/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/300-songs-one-konal-the-star-of-the-day/ Somnur Monir Konal never had to look back after “Channel i Shera Kontho”, making her presence felt with her lively and melodious voice in films, singles and albums. The singer recently received the national award for her performance in “Bhalobashar Manush Tumi”, in director Kazi Hayat’s “Bir”. For all the latest news, follow the Daily […]]]>

Somnur Monir Konal never had to look back after “Channel i Shera Kontho”, making her presence felt with her lively and melodious voice in films, singles and albums.

The singer recently received the national award for her performance in “Bhalobashar Manush Tumi”, in director Kazi Hayat’s “Bir”.

For all the latest news, follow the Daily Star’s Google News channel.

We talk to the songbird about this milestone, her career and more.

What comes to mind when you need to know the price?

I lost my dad to Covid in 2020, and I missed him a lot at that time. I dedicated this success to him, because he always inspired me to follow my passion for music. I shared the news with my mother, she was visibly happy, but a void remained, because we were missing our rock.

However, when we started receiving calls from friends, relatives and loved ones in my village, their joy made everything interesting and our bittersweet moments turned into jubilation.

I would especially like to thank Shakib Khan, because he personally chose me to lend my voice to this beautiful romantic piece.

Like some other National Awards nominations this year, your triumph did not come without controversy. What do you think?

Disagreements or controversies revolve around the lyrics of the song. “Bhalobashar Manush Tumi” did not receive “Best Song”; instead, I received the award in the “Best Singer” category for my vocalization. The two categories are completely different.

I find the argument irrelevant, and therefore, it does not concern me.

Are you looking forward to new movie tracks?

I have already recorded three upcoming reading issues, led by Emon Saha.

We recently finished shooting a music video for a single, composed by Bappa Mazumder. We shot the production in Old Dhaka, and I’m really looking forward to its release.

In addition to that, I have worked with renowned artists like Emon Chowdhury, Mushfik Litu and up-and-coming music directors like Avral Sahir, Akash Mahmud over the past few months and I am thrilled with the release of these songs.

What else are you busy with?

Since my return from the United States in December of last year, I have been busy performing. I had to stop playing last month, but I’ve been back to work at full speed since the first day of March.

Are you looking forward to releasing another solo album soon?

I’m not ready for a full fledged solo album right now.

I feel like my real place is in playback. I’ve been singing for movies since 2009, I’ve voiced over 300 songs since then.

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Munich and Rotterdam could fire Russian composer Gergiev, London abandons the Bolshoi https://allanpettersson.org/munich-and-rotterdam-could-fire-russian-composer-gergiev-london-abandons-the-bolshoi/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 10:50:00 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/munich-and-rotterdam-could-fire-russian-composer-gergiev-london-abandons-the-bolshoi/ Munich Mayor Dieter Reiter has threatened to remove Valery Gergiev as conductor of the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra unless Gergiev says publicly by Monday that he does not support the Russian invasion of Ukraine. The Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra has also said it will scrap the 68-year-old Russian’s planned festival in September if he does not stop […]]]>

Munich Mayor Dieter Reiter has threatened to remove Valery Gergiev as conductor of the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra unless Gergiev says publicly by Monday that he does not support the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

The Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra has also said it will scrap the 68-year-old Russian’s planned festival in September if he does not stop supporting Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Carnegie Hall announced on Friday that it was canceling two May performances of the Mariinsky Orchestra that were to be conducted by Gergiev. The institution cited “recent world events” and the pandemic, adding that it would not reschedule the shows. The move comes a day after the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra dropped Gergiev as conductor on a five-concert US tour that begins at Carnegie Hall on Friday.

Gergiev is close to Putin and supported Russia’s annexation of Crimea in 2014.

“I made my position clear to Valery Gergiev and asked him to distance himself clearly and unequivocally from the brutal invasion that Putin is waging against Ukraine and now in particular against our twin city, Kyiv,” Reiter said in a statement. a recent press release.

“If Valery Gergiev does not take a clear position by Monday, he will no longer be able to remain conductor of our philharmonic.”

Gergiev has been Munich’s conductor since the 2015-16 season. He was Principal Guest Conductor in Rotterdam from 1995 to 2008, and the orchestra launched an annual Gergiev Festival in 1996.

“In the event that Valery Gergiev does not openly distance himself from President Putin’s actions in Ukraine, we will be forced to cancel all concerts conducted by Valery Gergiev, including the Gergiev Festival which would take place in September,” said Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra in a statement. .

He is also musical director of the Mariinsky Theater in Saint Petersburg, Russia, and of the Festival des Nuits Blanches.

Gergiev, a conductor close to Russian President Vladimir Putin, will not lead the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra on a five-concert US tour that kicked off at Carnegie Hall on February 25. Photo: AFP

In addition, the Royal Opera House on Friday canceled a planned London tour by the Bolshoi Ballet of Moscow.

The Mariinsky and the Bolshoi are among Russia’s most renowned art institutions.

“A Bolshoi Ballet summer season at the Royal Opera House was in the final stages of planning,” the Royal Opera said in a statement. “Unfortunately, under the current circumstances, the season can no longer continue.”

Milan’s Teatro alla Scala also sent a letter to Gergiev on Thursday asking him to make a clear statement in support of a peaceful resolution in Ukraine or he would not be allowed to return to complete his tenure as Tchaikovsky. The Queen of Spades.

Milan Mayor Giuseppe Sala, who is La Scala’s president, said the request was made because Gergiev had repeatedly stated his closeness to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

La Scala said on Friday it had not yet received a response.

Online posts in recent days had promised demonstrations at Carnegie Hall, where Gergiev was to lead the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra on Friday and Saturday evenings and Sunday afternoons. The orchestra then travels to Hayes Hall in Naples, Florida, for performances on Tuesday and Wednesday.

The Metropolitan Opera’s music director, Yannick Nézet-Séguin, will replace Gergiev for the Carnegie concerts.

The Royal Opera House on Friday canceled a planned London tour by the Bolshoi Ballet of Moscow.  Photo: AFP The Royal Opera House on Friday canceled a planned London tour by the Bolshoi Ballet of Moscow. Photo: AFP

Semyon Bychkov, another top Russian conductor, issued a statement critical of the Russian government. The 69-year-old is music director of the Czech Philharmonic and was music director of the Orchester de Paris from 1989 to 1998. He emigrated to the United States in 1975 and has lived in Europe since the 1980s.

“Silence in the face of evil becomes its accomplice and eventually becomes its equal. Russian aggression in Ukraine brings us to what my generation hoped would never happen again: war,” Bychkov said.

“You have to be crazy to talk about the collapse of the Soviet Union as the greatest tragedy of the 20th century, as Putin defined it, rather than rejoicing in the fact that it happened without bloodshed and ended the kidnapping of many nations besides Russia itself.

Chicago Symphony Orchestra Music Director Riccardo Muti took the rare step of addressing the audience before a performance of Beethoven Ninth Symphony at the Orchestra Hall on Thursday evening.

“What I, we see on television is horrible,” Muti said.

“And, tonight, in the last movement of the symphony, Beethoven taking up Schiller’s text, he speaks of joy, joy, joy. But then we will think that joy without peace cannot exist. And so I hope that from this wonderful hall – from the orchestra, from the choir, from you – a message should reach all the people who not only in Ukraine but in the world (who) create violence, hatred and a strange need for war: we are against all that.”

The Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra dedicated performances to Mahler this weekend Second Symphony to those affected by the invasion.

“Putin’s insidious attack on Ukraine, which violates international law, is a knife in the back of the entire peaceful world,” said conductor Kirill Petrenko.

“It is also an attack on the arts which, as we know, unite across all borders. I stand in total solidarity with all my Ukrainian colleagues and can only hope that all artists will stick together. elbows for freedom, sovereignty and against aggression.” – PA

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Violinist, composer and conductor Jaakko Kuusisto has died | News https://allanpettersson.org/violinist-composer-and-conductor-jaakko-kuusisto-has-died-news/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 10:41:59 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/violinist-composer-and-conductor-jaakko-kuusisto-has-died-news/ Finnish musician Jaakko Kuusisto died on February 23, 2022. Diagnosed with a brain tumor in the summer of 2020, his condition deteriorated earlier this year and he was hospitalized. Kuusisto was born on January 17, 1974 into a family of musicians; his grandfather, Taneli Kuusisto, and his father, Ilkka Kuusisto, working as composers. He and […]]]>

Finnish musician Jaakko Kuusisto died on February 23, 2022. Diagnosed with a brain tumor in the summer of 2020, his condition deteriorated earlier this year and he was hospitalized.

Kuusisto was born on January 17, 1974 into a family of musicians; his grandfather, Taneli Kuusisto, and his father, Ilkka Kuusisto, working as composers. He and his younger brother Pekka started playing the violin at a young age, enjoying national success. Kuusisto won joint first prize at the Kuopio Violin Competition in 1989 and was a finalist at the Sibelius International Violin Competition in 1990.

The family moved to the United States in the early 1990s to allow the boys to study at the Jacobs School of Music at Indiana University Bloomington, where they studied with Miriam Fried. During a visit to Finland in 1998, Fried said of the siblings: “Pekka plays more instinctively, while Jaakko is more intellectual and exploratory”.

Kuusisto was a finalist in the 1997 Queen Elisabeth Competition, after which conductor Osmo Vänskä offered him the post of concertmaster of the Lahti Symphony Orchestra. He remained in the role until 2012, often performing as a soloist with the ensemble, as well as leading the orchestra on several recordings. His recording output includes Uljas Pulkkis’ enchanted garden Violin Concerto with Susanna Mälk and the Stavanger Symphony Orchestra, as well as Bach’s Violin Concertos with his brother Pekka and the Tapiola Sinfonietta. He also recorded early chamber works by Sibelius with pianist Folke Gräsbeck.



As a conductor, Kuusisto worked with the Oulu Symphony Orchestra from 2005 to 2009. He was the principal conductor of the Kuopio City Orchestra from 2018. He composed more than 40 works, including his own operas which he conducted at the Savonlinna Opera Festival, the Finnish National Opera and the Ilmajoki Music Festival. His last opera Jää created in 2019 and later revised for smaller forces due to the pandemic. Kuusisto was also artistic director of the Tuusulanjärvi Chamber Music Festival with his brother from 1999 to 2006 and of the Oulu Music Festival from 2013 to 2021.



A man of varied interests, he has also worked as a local politician, having been elected to the city council representing the Greens party in 2021. Together with his wife Maija Kuusisto they established a water taxi service in Savonlinna, where they transported guests attending the Savonlinna Opera Festival, while educating passengers about the opera they were about to see.

He is survived by his wife and two children from a previous marriage.

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The legendary video game composer talks about his work and his process https://allanpettersson.org/the-legendary-video-game-composer-talks-about-his-work-and-his-process/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 11:53:28 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/the-legendary-video-game-composer-talks-about-his-work-and-his-process/ Inon Zur is one of, otherwise the most, prolific composers working in the gaming industry today. With a massive backlog of iconic sheet music to his name, chances are any gamer worth his salt has had his songs stuck in his head at one point or another. The Israeli-American melodist is known for his work […]]]>

Inon Zur is one of, otherwise the most, prolific composers working in the gaming industry today. With a massive backlog of iconic sheet music to his name, chances are any gamer worth his salt has had his songs stuck in his head at one point or another.

The Israeli-American melodist is known for his work on artists like Dragon Age: Origins, Prince of Persia, Fall 3, 4 and New Vegas, Crysisthe next star field and many others. We sat down with Zur to discuss his work on the new game Syberia: the world before, which comes out on March 18 alongside the vinyl release of the soundtrack.

Before we begin, see Zur in action performing the main theme of Fallout 4.

Our conversation with Zur winds through a number of topics, including its creative process, how to really nail the tone of a video game through its music, and what the inside of a Fallout Vault looks like.

GAME Bible: Tell us about your process – how do you prepare to write a play? Are you often given carte blanche on what you want to do? Or do you have certain ideas and motives that are fed to you?

Inon Zur: Well, at the start of every project, but especially if it’s a new project, I’m always involved. I like to know as much as possible about the project first. If I can come to the studio and meet the people behind the game, watch the footage, the gameplay. If the game is in further development, I would really like to play the game. I really feel like it, before I even think about it [the music].

Then we get into the most creative meeting, which is the type of music the developers envision. So I have the three Ws, don’t I? ‘Where’, ‘what’ and ‘why’. And the “why” is actually the most important. Because I want to know: what motivates the characters in the game? What drives the plot? And I want to know how to drive the player himself.

So let me give you an example. When I worked on Fallout 4, (Head of Bethesda Game Studios) Todd Howard told me the story of the game, and it was a very intimate story about you looking for your son. So I said, how about the piano? Because the piano, for me, brings intimacy.

Fallout 4 / Credit: Bethesda

GB: It is interesting that you say how the piano came to be used as an expression of your son’s search. Does that feeling come often, when someone describes the game, or you play the game, and you hear the music you want to make for it?

IZ: Yes quite. Consider the “when” and the “where”, and take Syberia: The World Before, for example. We’re talking about pre-WWII, we’re talking about Europe – that already takes us to a very specific place in time. So I’m going to think of music that will bring the player into this era. One of the characters is a classical piano performer and obviously we want to feature the piano to support his character. So these things almost automatically scream for me to write them down.

GB: I was reading an interview where you said that you often want to talk to the sound designers of a game to get an idea of ​​what’s going on in a scene. The example you used was that if there is an engine running in a game scene, you will find out what key an engine is running in and write to that key. Can you explain your thought process behind this?

IZ: The best way to express music in games, I always say, is that you don’t really hear it, you feel it – it creates emotion, but you don’t really notice it. There are many techniques to do this, but one is to really consider other noises and background sounds. Now the player will be unaware, but something will feel right, or something will feel wrong and they will never really know why. But we know. So, for example, in the case of the engine purring in the key of E, if I wrote in F, which is a semitone above E, it would sound strained, weird, and uncomfortable, and I might well want create that feeling.

The problem is that it is about awareness. The music is a completely separate part of the soundtrack, as we have dialogue and sound effects, and more. If the music works with those things, it creates a wholesome experience. But if it draws too much attention to itself, it actually distracts the player from what’s going on, and that’s the last thing we want to do.

GB: So with games like Fallout and Prince of Persia, they’re based on fantasy and things that don’t necessarily exist. How do you incorporate that into the process?

IZ: That’s an excellent question. Let’s take Fallout as an example. We know that we are inside a parallel universe where, in the 1950s, the world [as we know it] just ceased to exist – but now we’re in the 2100s or whatever. A whole new reality has arisen. For that, I think the last music we knew was from the 50s, right? Now, from the 1950s, there has been a sort of diversion; an extraction of this [music], and he went to a very unknown place. Everything that was played by the violin, for example, will be improvised by a primitive instrument. Suppose all violins, including all dear Stradivariuses, cease to exist. Now we have to play, I don’t know, the kitchen sink or something that was left around here. Now, in Fallout specifically, I’ve created instruments that were born into this alternate reality. We help the player to be inside this universe by creating these sounds that are played on an instrument that literally does not exist.

GB: So what does the inside of a safe look like to you? Taking into account that you are bringing together instruments that you have created to create this ambient sound.

IZ: This is a very interesting question because the Vault is a stuffy place, but mostly the Vault is very metallic, there are a lot of metallic items there. Now here’s the trick – I can write a lot of music with metallic elements, but then what? It will merge with the real sound effects which are also metallic and it will cause confusion. Metallic sounds are usually very high pitched, so we create pads that are electronic but will have a metallic feel. They won’t have the attack or the punchy sound of the sound effects. It’ll sound a bit technological, it’ll sound a bit metallic, but it won’t be the real metal hits.

Fallout 4 / Credit: Bethesda
Fallout 4 / Credit: Bethesda

GB: So what Syberia sounds like, using this same example?

IZ: Imagine Berlin in 1937. People are walking around, and somewhere in the distance there is a lone violinist, playing and collecting coins from nice people. There’s people singing along in a church, the music that people know. I will create music that basically complements [these early 20th century sounds]. And the way to do that is to write something that will sound classic. When the player walks around Berlin, he will hear classical music, this will put him exactly where I want him to be. Of course, classical music can be happy, it can be sad and it can be scary; but again, the elements – orchestral elements, solos, classical soloists – that’s what really puts us in this world. With Syberia: The World Before, it’s so beautiful and amazing that I wouldn’t even call it a game. It’s an experience because the story is so captivating and I had to stay in a very realistic place. When I wrote [the soundtrack] I really took notes from Rachmaninoff, Debussy, Stravinsky, composers that we think these people from this milieu knew.

GB: When choosing a project, is it important to take into consideration the personal gratification you will get from it?

IZ: Of course. Since I was young, my parents listened to classical music. I was introduced to other types of music like jazz and rock and other styles much later in my life, but I’m most in touch with classical music. So, to compose the music for Syberia: The World Before was truly a dream come true. Because that led me to write classical music – that’s what I learned, that’s what I studied in Israel and here in the United States, and that’s what I like to do. I’m not saying I don’t like doing other styles. I’m very excited, for example, about the combination of electronic music and symphonic music in star field, which I can’t really talk about much. But it is also something that is very much like a discovery for me. Or Riderswhich came last year and was very, very hard and electronic – almost like a dubstep orchestra, shall we say!

GB: Do you find it hard to turn off, for example, when you go out to dinner, and you hear a pattern that you really like, do you think, ‘Oh, I wonder if I can just change the pitch or change the note slightly? .’

IZ: This happens a lot and I find myself singing on my cell phone and recording myself! Even sometimes, just by driving and thinking about stuff, I suddenly have a piece that’s with me for 24 hours, even when I’m sleeping! Today I dreamed, for example, that I was playing guitar and singing. Now I can barely play guitar and I’m definitely not a singer. But still, music is part of my life now. That said, my time in the studio is very concise. My daily routine is almost rigid, and that’s important to me. So I’ll start at eight o’clock and finish at five o’clock, and if it’s not really necessary, I won’t go back to the studio. I’m going to spend time with my family, but that doesn’t mean the music is going away.

GB: It’s surprising. Surely you have times when you are in the middle of inspiration and you have to go all the way?

IZ: I have to admit that sometimes, especially when I’m working on main themes, which are like the biggest challenge and obstacle, I spend a bit more time in the studio. But again, on a regular basis, I was really limiting myself to a maximum of nine hours in the studio and that was it. I think it’s very important for every songwriter to know when to stop – when to get out, when to do something else. Who are inspiring and also contribute to who you are.

GB: Yeah, that’s a good point, I imagine a lot of your inspiration comes from life. If you’re doing something and you’re going through something, do you kind of write your own music about what you’re doing in your head?

IZ: No, but I have to say that earworms are my way of life. There is always an earworm if I jog, walk or cycle. There is always a rhythm in what I do. It’s not pleasant, I must say. But it is what it is.

Syberia: The World Before will be released for Windows on March 18 with console versions coming later in the year. The digital version of the soundtrack has also already been released, and a vinyl copy will be available on March 18 alongside the game.

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Celebrate Shakira’s 45th birthday with these amazing songs! https://allanpettersson.org/celebrate-shakiras-45th-birthday-with-these-amazing-songs/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 12:59:21 +0000 https://allanpettersson.org/celebrate-shakiras-45th-birthday-with-these-amazing-songs/ A singer Shakira turns 45 today! Shakira Isabel Mebarak Ripoll was born on February 2, 1977 in Barranquilla, Colombia. Shakira has been called the “queen of Latin music” although her genres have ranged from reggae to Latin to pop. Shakira: everything you need to know MEGA Shakira first signed with Sony Music Columbia when she […]]]>

A singer Shakira turns 45 today!

Shakira Isabel Mebarak Ripoll was born on February 2, 1977 in Barranquilla, Colombia. Shakira has been called the “queen of Latin music” although her genres have ranged from reggae to Latin to pop.

Shakira: everything you need to know

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Shakira first signed with Sony Music Columbia when she was just 13 years old. She released her first album, Magia, in 1991 and her second album, Peligro, in 1993.

She released her next two albums Descalzo pies in 1995 and Donde Estan los Ladrones? in 1998.

In 2001, Shakira released her first English album titled Laundry Service. The album sold over 13 million copies worldwide and featured hit singles like “Whenever, Wherever”.

She has released three other Spanish albums: Fijacion Oral, Vol. 1 in 2005, and Salty the Ground in 2010 and Eldorado in 2017, all of which exceeded the Billboard Top Latin Albums Chart and was certified Diamond by the Recording Industry Association of America.

Shakira plays acoustic guitar in a small recording studio.
Instagram/shakira

She has also released several other albums in English: Oral Fixation, vol. 2 in 2005, wolf in 2009, and Shakira in 2014 were all certified gold, platinum or multi-platinum in various countries around the world.

Songs like ‘La Tortura’, ‘Hips Don’t Lie’, ‘Beautiful Liar’, ‘Waka Waka (This Time for Africa)’, ‘Loca’ and ‘Chantaje’ brought him international acclaim. In addition to singing, Shakira was also a coach on two seasons of “The Voice” from 2013 to 2014.

Shakira is one of the best-selling musical artists of all time, with over 80 million records sold worldwide. In 2018, Forbes reported that Shakira had become the most album-selling Latin female artist in history.

Shakira has received numerous accolades for her work, including three Grammy Awards, twelve Latin Grammy Awards, four MTV Video Music Awards, seven Billboard Music Awards, thirty-nine Billboard Latin Music Awards, six Guinness World Records, and a star on the Hollywood Walk. . of glory. Shakira was also named Best Latin Female Artist of the Decade by Billboard twice in the 2000s and 2010s.

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In addition to her musical work, Shakira is also known for her philanthropy. She created the Barefoot Foundation in 1997 to help poor and destitute children. For her philanthropic efforts and musical achievements, she received Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year and Harvard Foundation Artist of the Year awards in 2011.

Later that year, she was appointed to the President’s Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanics in the United States and Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French government in 2012.

Today fans are celebrating Shakira’s birthday with all her best hits! Looked!

“Hips Don’t Lie”

For some fans, there wasn’t a time when they went to a party and that song wasn’t playing on the speakers.

“Sometimes there’s just a voice in your head that says ‘Shakira Shakira,'” one fan wrote.

“This song is timeless,” shared another fan.

“It’s a great Latino and Caribbean mix,” another shared. “Shakira and the refugees should make more music. They create a good sound.

“Shakira is a gem,” added another. “She’s one of the best female celebrities I’ve ever known.”

‘Do not bother’

In the music video for ‘Don’t Bother,’ Shakira shares the plot of an entire movie in just four minutes and thirty seconds

“Singing this song just like Shakira does it loudly while driving alone at night is so much fun,” one fan wrote.

“Still obsessed with this song,” another shared. “Never Gets Old, Go Shak!!”

“I love how Shakira is always experimenting with different styles and beats,” said another. “Everything is fine with him.”

‘Anytime anywhere’

When Shakira performed this song on the Super Bowl Halftime Show, it propelled “Whenever, Wherever” into the top 10 of the charts!

“Shakira looks like she hasn’t aged a day, and she’s extremely talented too,” one fan wrote.

“Even though I don’t remember hearing this song much as a kid, it ALWAYS takes me back to my childhood!” another fan shared. “I feel like Shakira naturally has a nostalgic vibe to her music from the 2000s, no matter when it’s the first time you hear it.”

“Love the way she sings that,” another fan commented. “She goes through so many vocal resonators depending on the section, it’s so interesting and unique.”

Discover even more achievements!

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Want more songs? U.S. too! Check out the rest of these amazing songs!

‘Waka Wake (this time for Africa)’

‘Wolf’

“Beautiful Liar” with Beyoncé

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